Ferrari F8 Tributo

The Ferrari F8 Tributo is a mid-engine sports car produced by the Italian automobile manufacturer Ferrari.[3] The car is an update to the 488 with notable exterior and performance changes.[4] It was unveiled at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show.

Ferrari F8 Tributo
Ferrari F8 Tributo Genf 2019 1Y7A5665
Overview
ManufacturerFerrari
Production2019 (expected)
Model years2020
AssemblyMaranello, Italy
DesignerFerrari Styling Centre
Body and chassis
ClassSports car (S)
Body style2-door berlinetta
LayoutLongitudinal rear mid-engine, rear-wheel-drive
Powertrain
Engine3.9 L Ferrari F154CD twin-turbocharged V8
Transmission7-speed dual clutch
Dimensions
Wheelbase2,650 mm (104.3 in)[1]
Length4,611 mm (181.5 in)[2]
Width1,979 mm (77.9 in)[2]
Height1,206 mm (47.5 in)[2]
Kerb weight1,435 kg (3,164 lb)[1]
Chronology
PredecessorFerrarri 488 GTB

Specifications

Ferrari F8 Tributo Genf 2019 1Y7A5666
Rear view

Engine and transmission

The F8 Tributo uses the same engine from the 488 Pista, a 3.9 L twin-turbocharged V8 engine which has a power output of 720 PS (530 kW; 710 hp) and 770 N⋅m (568 lb⋅ft) of torque,[5][6] making it the most powerful conventional V8 powered Ferrari produced to date.[2] The transmission is a 7-speed dual clutch unit with improved gear ratios.[6]

Handling

Software

Several new software features are installed on the F8 which are controlled via the manettino drive-mode switch on the steering wheel. The car is equipped with Ferrari's latest Side Slip Angle Control traction- and stability-control program. Additionally, the Ferrari Dynamic Enhancer, an electronic program for managing drifts, can now be used in the Race drive mode.[6]

Performance

Claimed manufacturer performance for the F8 Tributo is 0–100 km/h (0–62 mph) in 2.9 seconds, 0–200 km/h (0–124 mph) in 7.6 seconds, with a top speed of 340 km/h (211 mph).[1] Ferrari also stated that the Tributo's downforce has been increased by 15 percent as compared to the 488 GTB.[6]

Design

Ferrari F8 Tributo Genf 2019 1Y7A5671
Interior

The lower fascia has been redesigned, taking several cues from the Pista, namely the S-Duct. The hood has been re-sculptured and the headlights have been redesigned to be more compact. The latter feature allows for additional air intakes above the headlights. The car also features quad taillamps, a feature that was last seen in the V8 lineage on F430. At the rear, it sports a louvered clear engine cover which pays homage to the F40 and a wrap-around rear spoiler inspired by the 308 GTB. The interior has received minor updates as well: the dash and instrument housing are new, and the two-tone color scheme from the 488 is also gone.[7] An 8.5 inch passenger touchscreen display is also standard as a part of the HMI (Human Machine Interface).[2]

References

  1. ^ a b c Ferrari F8 Tributo: Ferrari F8 Tributo, accessdate: 7 March 2019
  2. ^ a b c d e "Ferrari Reveals the F8 Tributo Ahead of the Geneva Motor Show". The Official Ferrari Magazine. 28 February 2019. Retrieved 4 March 2019.
  3. ^ Gastelu, Gary (February 28, 2019). "The Ferrari F8 Tributo is the most powerful V8 car its ever made". Fox News. Retrieved February 28, 2019.
  4. ^ Bigg, Martin (28 February 2019). "Ferrari F8 Tributo Revealed as 488 GTB Replacement". Carbuzz. Retrieved 28 February 2019.
  5. ^ "Mehr Power und weniger Gewicht: Ferrari F8 Tributo". welt.de. 28 February 2019. Retrieved 1 March 2019.
  6. ^ a b c d Stoklosa, Alexander (28 February 2019). "The 2020 Ferrari F8 Tributo Takes the Mid-Engined Sports Car Back to its Roots". Car and Driver. Retrieved 1 March 2019.
  7. ^ Smith, Christopher (28 February 2019). "2020 Ferrari F8 Tributo: See The Changes Side-by-Side". Motor1.com. Retrieved 1 March 2019.

External links

Ferrari 488

The Ferrari 488 (Type F142M) is a mid-engine sports car produced by the Italian automobile manufacturer Ferrari. The car is an update to the 458 with notable exterior and performance changes.

The car is powered by a 3.9-litre twin-turbocharged V8 engine, smaller in displacement but generating a higher power output than the 458's naturally aspirated engine. The 488 GTB was named "The Supercar of the Year 2015" by car magazine Top Gear, as well as becoming Motor Trend's 2017 "Best Driver's Car". The 488 was succeeded by the F8 Tributo in February 2019.

Ferrari F154 engine

The Ferrari F154 is a family of modular twin-turbocharged, direct injected V8 petrol engines designed and produced by Ferrari since 2013. It is a replacement for the naturally aspirated Ferrari/Maserati F136 V8 family on both Maserati and Ferrari cars.

They are the first turbocharged Ferrari road engines since the 1987 2.9-litre F120A V8 of the Ferrari F40.

Ferrari SF90 Stradale

The Ferrari SF90 Stradale is an upcoming mid-engine PHEV (Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle) sports car produced by the Italian automobile manufacturer Ferrari. The car shares its name with the SF90 Formula One car with the name standing for the 90th anniversary of the Scuderia Ferrari racing team and "Stradale" meaning for road.

Fiorano Circuit

The Fiorano Circuit is a private racetrack owned by Ferrari for development and testing purposes. It is located in Fiorano Modenese, near the Italian town of Maranello.

Built in 1972, it was originally 8.4 metres (27.6 ft) wide and 3000 metres (1.86 miles) long. In 1992, a chicane was added making it 3021 metres (1.88 miles) long, then in 1996 a new renovated track was introduced (a fast bend to replace a sharp corner at the end of the pit straight) which shortened the total length by 24 metres (0.02 miles). The average F1 lap speed is over 160 km/h (99 mph) and the F1 top speed is 290 km/h (180 mph). As Fiorano is a testing track, it has a wide range of corner types, with corner diameters between 370 metres (1,213.9 ft) and 13.71 metres (45.0 ft). Thus Ferrari is able to simulate corner and track types of other Grand Prix circuits.

The track is equipped with telemetry sensors and a large skidpad for tyre testing. In 2001 an irrigation system using rain collected in eight cisterns was installed to simulate wet track conditions. When Scuderia Ferrari are testing a F1 car at the track, it is common to see Tifosi watching the test from the roadside, which is the closest point from which the track is viewable to the public.

Ferrari customers are allowed to test drive new cars at the Fiorano circuit. The Ferrari 599 GTB Fiorano is named after this track.

In the 16 years from the time the track opened until his death in 1988, Enzo Ferrari would either sit in his house which was located at the circuit and listen to, or actually sit track side and watch his beloved scarlet Formula One cars testing. Legend has it that this was actually the real reason that the "old man" had the circuit built, so he could enjoy his cars and his drivers without the presence of other F1 cars or the press. In reality Ferrari made the decision of building his own testing track when he realised that the Modena Autodrome could no longer serve this purpose.

Flavio Manzoni

Flavio Manzoni (born 7 January 1965 in Nuoro, Sardinia) is an Italian architect and automobile designer. He is the Senior Vice President of Design at Ferrari.

Geneva Motor Show

The Geneva International Motor Show is an annual auto show held in March in the Swiss city of Geneva. The show is hosted at the Palexpo, a convention centre located next to the Geneva Cointrin International Airport. The Salon is organised by the Organisation Internationale des Constructeurs d'Automobiles, and is considered an important major international auto show.First held in 1905, the Salon has hosted almost all major internal combustion engined models in the history of the automobile, along with benzene- and steam-powered cars from the beginning of the century. Exotic supercars often steal the spotlight during their debuts at the show. Prototypes, new equipment, technical breakthroughs, international partnerships, as well as political and social debates, have been announced at the exhibition. The show is regarded as a level playing field for the world's automakers, aided by the fact Switzerland lacks an auto industry of its own.

Italy

Italy (Italian: Italia [iˈtaːlja] (listen)), officially the Italian Republic (Italian: Repubblica Italiana [reˈpubblika itaˈljaːna]), is a European country consisting of a peninsula delimited by the Italian Alps and surrounded by several islands. Located in the middle of the Mediterranean sea and traversed along its length by the Apennines, Italy has a largely temperate seasonal and Mediterranean climate. The country covers an area of 301,340 km2 (116,350 sq mi) and shares open land borders with France, Slovenia, Austria, Switzerland and the enclaved microstates of Vatican City and San Marino. Italy has a territorial exclave in Switzerland (Campione) and a maritime exclave in the Tunisian Sea (Lampedusa). With around 60 million inhabitants, Italy is the fourth-most populous member state of the European Union.

Due to its central geographic location in Southern Europe and the Mediterranean, Italy has historically been home to myriad peoples and cultures. In addition to the various ancient peoples dispersed throughout modern-day Italy, the most predominant being the Indo-European Italic peoples who gave the peninsula its name, beginning from the classical era, Phoenicians and Carthaginians founded colonies mostly in insular Italy, Greeks established settlements in the so-called Magna Graecia of southern Italy, while Etruscans and Celts inhabited central and northern Italy respectively. An Italic tribe known as the Latins formed the Roman Kingdom in the 8th century BC, which eventually became a republic with a government of the Senate and the People. The Roman Republic initially conquered and assimilated its neighbours on the peninsula, eventually expanding and conquering parts of Europe, North Africa and Asia. By the first century BC, the Roman Empire emerged as the dominant power in the Mediterranean Basin and became the leading cultural, political and religious centre of Western civilisation, inaugurating the Pax Romana, a period of more than 200 years during which Italy's law, technology, economy, art, and literature developed. Italy remained the homeland of the Romans and the metropole of the empire, whose legacy can also be observed in the global distribution of culture, governments, Christianity and the Latin script.

During the Early Middle Ages, Italy endured sociopolitical collapse and barbarian invasions, but by the 11th century, numerous rival city-states and maritime republics, mainly in the northern and central regions of Italy, rose to great prosperity through trade, commerce and banking, laying the groundwork for modern capitalism. These mostly independent statelets served as Europe's main trading hubs with Asia and the Near East, often enjoying a greater degree of democracy than the larger feudal monarchies that were consolidating throughout Europe; however, part of central Italy was under the control of the theocratic Papal States, while Southern Italy remained largely feudal until the 19th century, partially as a result of a succession of Byzantine, Arab, Norman, Angevin, Aragonese and other foreign conquests of the region. The Renaissance began in Italy and spread to the rest of Europe, bringing a renewed interest in humanism, science, exploration and art. Italian culture flourished, producing famous scholars, artists and polymaths. During the Middle Ages, Italian explorers discovered new routes to the Far East and the New World, helping to usher in the European Age of Discovery. Nevertheless, Italy's commercial and political power significantly waned with the opening of trade routes that bypassed the Mediterranean. Furthermore, centuries of infighting between the Italian city-states, such as the Italian Wars of the 15th and 16th centuries, left the region fragmented, and it was subsequently conquered and further divided by European powers such as France, Spain and Austria.

By the mid-19th century, rising Italian nationalism and calls for independence from foreign control led to a period of revolutionary political upheaval. After centuries of foreign domination and political division, Italy was almost entirely unified in 1861, establishing the Kingdom of Italy as a great power. From the late 19th century to the early 20th century, Italy rapidly industrialised, namely in the north, and acquired a colonial empire, while the south remained largely impoverished and excluded from industrialisation, fuelling a large and influential diaspora. Despite being one of the main victors in World War I, Italy entered a period of economic crisis and social turmoil, leading to the rise of a fascist dictatorship in 1922. Participation in World War II on the Axis side ended in military defeat, economic destruction and the Italian Civil War. Following the liberation of Italy and the rise of the resistance, the country abolished the monarchy, established a democratic Republic and enjoyed a prolonged economic boom, becoming a highly developed country.Today, Italy is considered to be one of the world's most culturally and economically advanced countries, with its economy ranking eighth-largest in the world and third in the Eurozone by nominal GDP. Italy has the sixth-largest worldwide national wealth, the third-largest central bank gold reserve, and a very high life expectancy. The country plays a prominent role in regional and global economic, military, cultural and diplomatic affairs; it is both a regional power and a great power, and is ranked the world's eighth most-powerful military. Italy is a founding and leading member of the European Union and a member of numerous international institutions, including the UN, NATO, the OECD, the OSCE, the WTO, the G7, the G20, the Union for the Mediterranean, the Council of Europe, Uniting for Consensus, the Schengen Area and many more. The country have greatly influenced and contributed to diverse fields, notably the arts, music, literature, philosophy, science and technology, fashion, cinema, cuisine, sports, as well as jurisprudence, banking and business. As a reflection of its cultural wealth, Italy is home to the world's largest number of World Heritage Sites (54), and is the fifth-most visited country.

List of sports cars

This page is a compilation of sports cars, coupés, roadsters, supercars, hypercars, race cars, and super SUVs, both discontinued and still in production. Cars that have sport trims (such as the Honda Civic SI) will be listed under the sport trims section. Production tunes will include cars modified by outside brands and then sold. This does not include in-house brands such as Ford's Special Vehicle Team, which will be included in the main list. Some vehicles are sold under different brands, therefore some vehicles may be listed more than once but usually link to the same page. Different countries/continents may also classify vehicles differently, for example; the Toyota 86 name is known throughout most of the world. However, in Europe, it's sold as the Toyota GT86, and in the United States and Canada it's sold under the Scion marque as the Scion FR-S (at least, until 2016) and the Subaru marque as the Subaru BRZ.

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Type 2000s 2010s
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
V8 Rear mid-engine
sports car
360 458 F8 Tributo
Challenge Stradale 430 Scuderia 458 Speciale 488 Pista
F430 488
Convertible California California T Portofino
2+2 grand tourer GTC4Lusso T
V12 Grand tourer 550 Maranello 575M Maranello 599 GTB Fiorano F12berlinetta 812 Superfast
550 Barchetta Superamerica 599 SA Aperta/599 GTO F60 America/F12tdf
2+2 grand tourer 456M 612 Scaglietti FF GTC4Lusso
Supercar Enzo LaFerrari LaFerrari Aperta
XX Programmes FXX 599XX 599XX Evoluzione FXX K FXX K Evo
Ferrari Icona Monza SP
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