Ferrari 340

See also the 340 F1, a Formula One racer, and 340 America, a GT car
Concours d'Elegance (20452578560)
Ferrari 340 Mexico Vignale Spyder
Ferrari 340 MM (1953)
Ferrari 340 MM Vignale Spyder

The Ferrari 340 Mexico was a Ferrari race car which was intended for the 1952 Carrera Panamericana. It used 4.1 L Lampredi V12 engine producing around 280 PS (206 kW) at 6600 rpm, for a maximum speed of 280 km/h.[1] Just 4 were made in 1952, 3 Vignale Berlinettas and 1 Vignale Spyder; all designed by Giovanni Michelotti.[1] Mexico used a 2,600 mm (102.4 in) wheelbase. Chinetti and Lucas finished the race at third place in berlinetta.[2][3]

The Ferrari 340 MM was an evolution of the 340 Mexico with shorter, 2,500 mm (98.4 in), wheelbase. MM used the same 4.1 L Lampredi V12 with similar three Weber 40DCF carburettors that helped the 340 achieve 280 PS (206 kW) at 6600 rpm and a maximum speed of 282 km/h.[4] 10 examples were made, 4 Pinin Farina Berlinettas, 2 Touring Spyders and 4 Vignale Spyders (designed by Giovanni Michelotti). A total of four were converted to 375 MM spec.[5] Giannino Marzotto won Mille Miglia 1953 edition in Vignale spider, setting a new average speed record for the race; with other 340 MM finishing fourth. Two more 340 MMs were entered that year in Touring barchetta guise but did not finish.[6]

References

  1. ^ a b Acerbi, Leonardo (2012). Ferrari: All The Cars. Haynes Publishing. pp. 50–51.
  2. ^ "Ferrari 340 Mexico". ferrari.com. Retrieved 2019-05-13.
  3. ^ "Carrera Panamericana 1952 Race Results". racingsportscars.com. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  4. ^ "Ferrari 340 MM". ferrari.com. Retrieved 2015-12-14.
  5. ^ Acerbi, Leonardo (2012). Ferrari: All The Cars. Haynes Publishing. pp. 64–65.
  6. ^ "Mille Miglia 1953 Race Results". racingsportscars.com. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  • Acerbi, Leonardo (2012). Ferrari: All The Cars. Haynes Publishing. ISBN 978 1 84425 581 8.
1951 24 Hours of Le Mans

The 1951 24 Hours of Le Mans was the 19th Grand Prix of Endurance, and took place on 23 and 24 June 1950. It was won by Peter Walker and Peter Whitehead in their works-entered Jaguar C-type, the first Le Mans win for the marque.

This year marked the real start of the modern era of sports-car racing, with the arrival of Jaguar's purpose-built racer, and the first showing for Porsche and Lancia. It was also the final time for Delahaye and Bentley (for 50 years). The race was marred by the death of French driver Jean Larivière within the opening laps of the race.

1952 24 Hours of Le Mans

The 1952 24 Hours of Le Mans was the 20th Grand Prix of Endurance, and took place on 14–15 June 1952 at Circuit de la Sarthe.

After 22 years away, Mercedes-Benz returned in triumph, scoring a 1–2 victory with their new gull-wing Mercedes-Benz W194 which was equipped with a 3.0L S6 engine that had less power than the road car sold two years later.

This race was notable in that Pierre Levegh (Pierre Bouillin) attempted to drive the entire 24 Hours by himself – and almost won. Exhausted in the 24th hour, he missed a downshift in his Talbot-Lago and over-revved the engine, breaking a connecting rod. Antonio Lago carried a piece of the broken rod with him for several years thereafter as a keepsake.

1952 Monaco Grand Prix

The 1952 Monaco Grand Prix was a non-championship sports car race held on June 2, 1952, at Monaco.

For the second time in two races, the Grand Prix suffered a multi-car pileup. In addition, it was marred by Luigi Fagioli's wreck in practice, which ultimately proved fatal.

1953 24 Hours of Le Mans

The 1953 24 Hours of Le Mans was the 21st Grand Prix of Endurance, and took place on 13 and 14 June 1953, at the Circuit de la Sarthe, Le Mans (France). It was also the third round of the F.I.A. World Sports Car Championship.British drivers Tony Rolt and Duncan Hamilton won the race with one of three factory-entered Jaguar C-Types, the first cars ever to race at Le Mans with disc brakes.

1953 Mille Miglia

The 1953 Mille Miglia, was the second round of the 1953 F.I.A. World Sportscar Championship and was held on the open-road of Italy, on 26 April 1953. The route was based on a round trip between Brescia and Rome, with start/finish, in Brescia.A total of 577 cars were entered 1953 running of the Mille Miglia, across eight classes based on engine sizes, ranging from up to 750cc to over 2.0 litre, for both Touring Cars and Sport Cars. Of these, 490 cars started the event. Although this not strictly a race against each other, this is race against the clock, as the cars are released at one-minute intervals with the larger professional class cars going before the slower cars, in the Mille Miglia, however the smaller displacement, slower cars started first. Each car number related to their allocated start time. For example Juan-Manuel Fangio’s car had the number 602, he left Brescia at 6:02am, while the first cars had started late in the evening on the previous day.

1953 World Sportscar Championship

The 1953 World Sportscar Championship was the first FIA World Sportscar Championship. It was a seven race international motor racing series for sports cars contested from 8 March to 23 November 1953. The championship was won by Ferrari.

Bridgehampton Sports Car Races

The Bridgehampton Sports Car Races was a sports car race held at Bridgehampton Race Circuit between 1949 and 1971.

Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera

Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera is an Italian automobile coachbuilder. Originally established in Milan in 1925, Carrozzeria Touring became well known for both the beauty of its designs and patented superleggera construction methods. The business folded in 1966. In 2006 its brands and trademarks were purchased and a new firm established nearby to provide automotive design, engineering, coachbuilding, homologation services, non-automotive industrial design, and restoration of historic vehicles.

Carrozzeria Touring was established on 25 March 1926 by Felice Bianchi Anderloni (1882–1948) and Gaetano Ponzoni. After achieving success through the middle of the 20th century, the business began to decline as automobile manufacturers replaced body-on-frame automobile construction with monocoque design and increasingly took coachbuilding in-house.

After the original firm ceased production in 1966, Carlo Felice Bianchi Anderloni and Carrozzeria Marazzi preserved the "Touring Superleggera" trademark and used it on several occasions to support the company's heritage. The trademark was acquired by the current owner, a family business, which began conducting its activities in 2006 under the name Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera S.r.l.; the new firm is headquartered nearby Milan, its hometown.

Ferrari 275 S

Ferrari 275 S was a sports racing car produced by Ferrari in 1950. It was the first Ferrari powered by a new Aurelio Lampredi-designed V12 engine, created as a large displacement alternative to the initial 1,5 L Colombo V12, used in supercharged form in Ferrari 125 F1. Formula One regulations allowed for up to 4.5 L in naturally aspirated form.

Ferrari 375 F1

See also the 340 and 375 road cars sharing the same engineAfter finding only modest success with the supercharged 125 F1 car in Formula One, Ferrari decided to switch for 1950 to the naturally aspirated 4.5-litre formula for the series. Calling in Aurelio Lampredi to replace Gioacchino Colombo as technical director, Enzo Ferrari directed that the company work in stages to grow and develop an entirely new large-displacement V12 engine for racing.

The first outcome of Lampredi's work was the experimental 275 S. Just two of these racing barchettas were built, based on the 166 MM but using the experimental 3.3-litre V12. These were raced at the Mille Miglia of 1950 on April 23. Although one car held the overall lead for a time, both were forced to retire with mechanical failure before the end.

The 275 F1 made its debut at the Grand Prix of Belgium on June 18, sporting the same 3.3-litre (3322 cc/202 in³) version of Lampredi's new engine. With three Weber 42DCF carburetors, a single overhead camshaft for each bank of cylinders, and two valves per cylinder, the engine produced a capable 300 hp (224 kW) at 7200 rpm. Alberto Ascari drove the car to fifth place, marking the end of the 3.3-litre engine.

The 275 was replaced at the Grand Prix of Nations at Geneva on July 30, 1950 by the 340 F1. As the name suggests, the car sported a larger 4.1-litre (4101.66 cc/250 in³) version of Lampredi's V12. Other changes included a new de Dion tube rear suspension based on that in the 166 F2 car and four-speed gearbox. It had a longer 2,420 mm (95 in) wheelbase, but other dimensions remained the same. With 335 hp (250 kW), Ascari was able to keep up with the Alfa Romeo 158 of Juan Manuel Fangio but retired with engine trouble. Although the 340 proved itself capable, it was only the middle step in Ferrari's 1950 car development.

Ferrari achieved the 4.5-litre goal of the formula with the 375 F1, two of which debuted at Monza on September 3, 1950. This 4.5-litre (4493.73 cc/274 in³) engine produced roughly the same power as its 4.1-litre predecessor, but its tractability earned Ascari second place in that debut race. A series of modifications through the 1951 season allowed Ferrari to finally put Alfa Romeo behind it in a Formula One race, with José Froilán González' victory at Silverstone on July 14 becoming the constructor's first World Championship win. Ascari's wins at the Nürburgring and Monza and strong finishes throughout the season cemented the company's position as a Formula One contender.

Changes in the Formula One regulations led the company to shift the big engine to an Indy car, the 1952 375 Indianapolis. Three new Weber 40IF4C carburettors brought power output to 380 hp (279 kW), the wheelbase was lengthened, and the chassis and suspension were strengthened. Although the car performed well in European testing, it was not able to meet the American challenge, with just one of four 375s even qualifying for the 1952 Indianapolis 500. Ascari was the driver who did qualify the car for the race, starting 25th (out of 33 starters) with a qualifying speed of 134.3 mp/h (the pole was won by American Chet Miller who pushed his supercharged Kurtis Kraft-Novi to 139.03 mp/h). Ascari would be classified in 31st place, completing only 40 of the 200 laps before being forced to retire with wheel failure, though he would go on to win the remaining six Grands Prix of the season to easily win his first World Championship from Ferrari teammate Giuseppe Farina.

The big V12 was scrapped for 1954, as Formula One required a 2.5-litre engine. The new 553 F1 adopted Lampredi's four cylinder engine, leaving the V12 for sports car use.

The 375 was driven during the 2011 British Grand Prix weekend by then-current Ferrari driver Fernando Alonso as a tribute to the sixtieth anniversary of the Ferrari's first World Championship Grand Prix win at the 1951 British Grand Prix at Silverstone, with Argentinean driver José Froilán González driving at the time.

Ferrari 375 MM

See Ferrari 375 F1 for the 375 used in Formula 1 racing, and 375 America, a GT carFerrari 375 MM, was a race car produced by Ferrari in 1953 and 1954. It was named "375" for the per-cylinder displacement in the 4.5 L V12 engine, and the "MM" stood for the Mille Miglia race. The engine was based on its Ferrari 375 F1 counterpart, but with shorter stroke and bigger bore. The first prototype was a Vignale Spyder and three next cars were Pinin Farina Berlinettas, all converted from Ferrari 340 MM. Perhaps the most known 375 MM is the "Ingrid Bergman" version, commissioned in 1954 by director Roberto Rossellini for his wife, actress Ingrid Bergman. The Bergman 375 MM was subsequently bought and restored by the Microsoft executive Jon Shirley and the restoration specialist Butch Dennison. It later became the first postwar Ferrari to win Best of Show at the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance. Although intended for Mille Miglia, 375 MM was also raced with limited success in Carrera Panamericana, scoring fourth place in 1953 and finishing second in 1954. In total 26 units were made, including four converted from 340 MM.

Ferrari America

Ferrari America is a series of top-end Ferrari models built in the 1950s and 1960s. They were large grand touring cars with the largest V12 engines and often had custom bodywork. All America models used a live axle in the rear, were front-engined, and had worm and sector steering.

Two of the series, the 410 and the 400, were called Superamerica. The final member of the America production family was called the 500 Superfast. The series also includes the 365 California.

Ferrari Lampredi engine

Aurelio Lampredi designed a number of racing engines for Ferrari. He was brought on to hedge the company's bets with a different engine family than the small V12s designed by Gioacchino Colombo. Lampredi went on to design a number of different Inline-4, Inline-6, and V12 engines through the 1950s, and it was these that would power the company's string of world championships that decade. All were quickly abandoned, however, with the Dino V6 and V8 taking the place of the fours and sixes and evolution of the older Colombo V12 continuing as the company's preeminent V12.

Gianni Marzotto

Count Giannino Marzotto (13 April 1928 in Valdagno, Italy – 14 July 2012) was an Italian racing driver and entrepreneur. Marzotto served as President of the Mille Miglia Club, and twice winner of race in 1950 and 1953.

Giovanni Michelotti

Giovanni Michelotti (6 October 1921 – 23 January 1980) was one of the most prolific designers of sports cars in the 20th century. His notable contributions were for Ferrari, Lancia, Maserati and Triumph marques. He was also associated with truck designs for Leyland Motors, and with designs for British Leyland (including the Leyland National bus) after the merger of Leyland and BMC.

Born in Turin, Italy, Michelotti worked for coachbuilders, including Stabilimenti Farina, Vignale, Ghia-Aigle, Scioneri, Monterosa, Viotti and Allemano, before opening his own design studio in 1959.Towards the end of his life, asked whether he had ever designed anything other than cars, Michelotti acknowledged that virtually all of his design work had involved cars, but he admitted to having designed a coffee making machine shortly after the war.

List of most expensive cars sold at auction

This is a list of the most expensive cars sold in auto auctions through the traditional bidding process, that of those that attracted headline grabbing publicity, mainly for the high price their new owners have paid.

August 2018 Ferrari 250 GTO (number 23) auctioned for $48.4 million.

June 2018: A 1963 Ferrari 250 GTO, known as the Holy Grail model, won the Tour de France in 1963, changed hands for a world record US$70 million (not auction). It is a 174 mph road-legal racing car and one of only 36 built between 1962 and 1964. It was purchased by an American businessman.

A 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO, serial number 3413GT, sold at RM Sotheby's Auction on August 25, 2018 for US$48,405,000 (including buyer's premium). This broke the record previously held by another 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO, serial number 3851GT, which sold for a then-record $38,115,000 (including buyer's premium) at Bonham's Quail Auction on August 14, 2014. While collectible cars have been sold privately for more, this is the highest price ever paid for a car at a public auction.The 1904 Rolls-Royce 10 hp Two-Seater is currently listed on the Guinness World Records as the most expensive veteran car to be sold, at the price of US$7,254,290 (equivalent to $8,765,000 in 2018), on a Bonhams auction held at Olympia in London on December 3, 2007.This list only consists of those that have been sold for at least $4 million in auction sales during a traditional bidding process, inclusive of the mandatory buyers premium and does not include private, unsuccessful (failing to reach its reserve price, incomplete) and out of auction sales.

Mille Miglia

The Mille Miglia (Italian pronunciation: [ˈmille ˈmiʎʎa], Thousand Miles) was an open-road, motorsport endurance race established in 1927 by the young Counts Aymo Maggi and Franco Mazzotti, which took place in Italy twenty-four times from 1927 to 1957 (thirteen before the war, eleven from 1947).Like the older Targa Florio and later the Carrera Panamericana, the MM made grand tourers like Alfa Romeo, BMW, Ferrari, Maserati, Mercedes Benz and Porsche famous. The race brought out an estimated five million spectators.From 1953 until 1957, the Mille Miglia was also a round of the World Sports Car Championship.

Since 1977, the "Mille Miglia" has been reborn as a regularity race for classic and vintage cars. Participation is limited to cars, produced no later than 1957, which had attended (or were registered) to the original race. The route (Brescia–Rome round trip) is similar to that of the original race, maintaining the point of departure/arrival in Viale Venezia in Brescia.

Tom Cole (racing driver)

Tom Cole (11 June 1922 – 14 June 1953) was a British racing driver, who raced on an American racing license, who made a name for himself in the early 1950s, but paid the ultimate price for his love of motorsport.

Vittorio Marzotto

Vittorio Marzotto (13 June 1922, Valdagno – 4 February 1999) was an Italian racing driver. He drove 16 sports car races between 1948 and 1955, mainly in Ferrari's, his best results being two victories and three second places. He also entered a Formula 1-race in 1952, the French Grand Prix, as reserve driver for Scuderia Ferrari. However, all Ferrari works drivers started the race, so Marzotto was unable to and he never entered Formula 1 again.

Marzotto was the son of Count Gaetano Marzotto and he was the oldest of four brothers (Paolo, Giannino, Umberto and Vittorio), who were all racing drivers too.

Key personnel
Current drivers
Test drivers
Ferrari Driver Academy
World champions
Drivers' titles
Constructors' titles
Race winners
Former personnel
Formula One cars
IndyCar/CART cars
Sports racing cars
Ferrari road car timeline, 1947–1969 — next »
Type 1940s 1950s 1960s
7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Sports 275 S 340 Mexico/MM 375 MM 375 Plus 410 S
125 S 166 S/166 MM 195 S 212 Export 225 S 250 MM 250 Monza 315 S 250 Testa Rossa 250 LM
159 S 250 S 290 MM 335 S 250  GTO
Berlinetta 250 GT "Tour de France" 250 GT "SWB" 250 GT Lusso 275 GTB 275 GTB/4 365 GTB/4
Coupé 166 Inter 195 Inter 212 Inter 250 Europa 250 Europa GT 250 GT Boano 250 GT Ellena 250 GT Coupé Pinin Farina 330 GTC 365 GTC
2+2 250 GT/E 330 GT 2+2 365 GT 2+2
Spider 250 GT Cabriolet 275 GTS 330 GTS 365 GTS
250 GT California Spyder
America 340/342 America 375 America 410 Superamerica 400 Superamerica 500 Superfast 365 California

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