Ferrari 212 Inter

The Ferrari 212 Inter replaced Ferrari's successful 166 and 195 Inter grand tourers in 1951. Unveiled at the Brussels Motor Show that year, the 212 was an evolution of the 166 — a sports car for the road that could also win international races. In 1951, two 212 Inters, both Vignale coupés, driven by Taruffi/Chinetti and Ascari/Villoresi, scored 1-2 victory at Carrera Panamericana in Mexico.[2]

The chassis was similar to the 125 with a suspension featuring double wishbones in front and live axle in back. Coachbuilders included Carrozzeria Touring, Ghia, Ghia-Aigle, Vignale, Stabilimenti Farina, and now Pinin Farina. The latter was an important move for the company, as Farina was already well-known and adding his styling skills would be a tremendous boost for Maranello. However, Pinin Farina was as prideful as Enzo Ferrari, and neither would go to the other to request business up to this point. A mutual meeting halfway between Maranello and Turin was the negotiated solution.[3] First Ferrari to be bodied by Pinin Farina was 212 Inter Cabriolet, chassis no. 0177E.

The Inter's 2,600 mm (102.4 in) wheelbase was 4" longer than the 2,500 mm (98.4 in) Export's. The cars shared a larger, bored-out (68 mm) 2.6 L (2563 cc/156 in³) version of Ferrari's Colombo V12 engine. Output was 150 PS (110 kW; 148 hp) for the single Weber 36DCF carburetor Inter, 165 PS (121 kW; 163 hp) for the triple Weber Export. Improved cylinder heads raised power 5 PS (4 kW) in 1952.

The British magazine Autocar got hold of what they described as the first production model Ferrari 212 in 1950, which outperformed any car that they had previously tested.[4] It recorded a top speed of over 116 mph (187 km/h) and acceleration times of 0 to 60 mph (96 km/h) of 10.5 seconds[4] and 100 mph (161 km/h) in 22.5 seconds; the magazine however noted they had limited the engine to 6,500 rpm out of respect for the newness and low mileage of the car they were using, which suggested that even better performance would be available from a fully "run in" model. The test appears also to have been the Autocar team's first encounter with a five speed gear box.[4]

1952 Ferrari 212 Vignale Coupe

Vignale's 212 show car from 1952

Ferrari 212 Inter Vignale

A 212 Inter Vignale at the Mille Miglia Storica

Ferrari (3157360771)

212 Inter Vignale nicknamed "Bumblebee"[5]

0177E

First Ferrari designed by Pinin Farina, 212 Inter Cabriolet

Ferrari 212 Inter
1952 Ferrari 212 Export Vignale Cabriolet (19011674504)
Ferrari 212 Inter Vignale Cabriolet
Overview
ManufacturerFerrari
Production1951–1952
82 produced
DesignerCarrozzeria Touring,[1] Pinin Farina, Vignale, Ghia, Stabilimenti Farina
Body and chassis
ClassSports car
LayoutFR layout
Powertrain
Engine2.6 L (2562.51 cc) Colombo V12
Transmission5-speed manual
Dimensions
Wheelbase2,600 mm (102 in)
Curb weight1,000 kg (2,205 lb) (coupé)
Chronology
PredecessorFerrari 195 Inter
SuccessorFerrari 250

212/225

A single 212 Inter, chassis no. 0223EU,[6] was fitted with the available "225" or 2.7 L Colombo V12, combined with a long wheelbase Europa type chassis, creating a unique model that would be properly referred to as a 225 Inter. This 1952 one-off model was given a Giovanni Michelotti penned berlinetta body built by Vignale.

Another 212 Inter, chassis number 0253EU, also received the 2.7 liter three-carburetor V12, and was bodied as the last Barchetta by Carrozzeria Touring in their Superleggera construction method. It was acquired by Ford Motor Company for Henry Ford II for study in the research leading to the development of Ford's competitor to the Corvette, the Thunderbird. The car is currently in the collection of the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, CA.

1952-ferrari

1952 Ferrari 212/225 Touring Barchetta

References

  1. ^ "Registro Internazionale Touring Superleggera". Retrieved November 11, 2012.
  2. ^ "Carrera Panamericana 1951 Race Results". racingsportscars.com. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  3. ^ Enzo Ferrari and “Pinin” Farina: The birth of the myth. Archived 2009-08-17 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ a b c "Ferrari 212 Two-Seater (road test)". Autocar. Autocar Road test compendium 1950. 1950.
  5. ^ "1952 Ferrari 212 Inter Vignale Coupe "Bumblebee"". bonhams.com. Retrieved 10 June 2019.
  6. ^ "225 Europa Vignale Coupe 0223EU". barchetta.cc. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  • Acerbi, Leonardo (2012). Ferrari: All The Cars. Haynes Publishing. ISBN 978 1 84425 581 8.
1953 1000km of Nürburgring

The 1953 ADAC 1000 Kilometer-Rennen Nürburgring took place on 30 August, on the Nürburgring Nordschleife, (West Germany). It was also the fifth round of the F.I.A. World Sports Car Championship. This was the first time the event had taken place, although it would not run again until 1956.

1957 1000 km Buenos Aires

The 1957 1000 km Buenos Aires took place on 20 January, on the Circuito de la Costanera Norte, (Buenos Aires, Argentina). It was the fourth running of the race, and once again, it was opening round of the F.I.A. World Sports Car Championship. For this event, was moved from its previous venue, the Autódromo Municipal-Avenida Paz, only to return to the Autódromo in 1958.

Alberto Ascari

Alberto Ascari (Italian pronunciation: [alˈbɛrto ˈaskari]; 13 July 1918 – 26 May 1955) was an Italian racing driver and twice Formula One World Champion. He was a multitalented racer who competed in motorcycle racing before switching to cars. Ascari won consecutive world titles in 1952 and 1953 for Scuderia Ferrari. He was the team's first World Champion and the last Italian to date to win the title. This was sandwiched an appearance in the Indianapolis 500 in 1952. Ascari also won the Mille Miglia in 1954. Ascari was noted for the careful precision and finely-judged accuracy that made him one of the safest drivers in a most dangerous era. Ascari remains along with Michael Schumacher Ferrari's only back-to-back World Champions, and he is also Ferrari's sole Italian champion.

When Alberto was a young child, his father, Antonio, who was also a famous racing driver, died in an accident at the 1925 French Grand Prix. Alberto once admitted that he warned his children not to become extremely close to him because of the risk involved in his profession. So this proved when he was killed during a test session for Scuderia Ferrari at the Autodromo Nazionale Monza. Ascari was notoriously superstitious and took great pains to avoid tempting fate. His unexplained fatal accident – at the same age as his father's, on the same day of the month and in eerily similar circumstances – remains one of Formula One racing's great tragic coincidences.

Barchetta

Barchetta (Italian pronunciation: [barˈketta]), which translates as "little boat" in Italian, is a term used by Italian car manufacturers for two-seat sports cars with either an open top or convertible roof.

The term was originally used for lightweight open-top racing cars of the late 1940s through the 1950s. Since the 1950s, the name barchetta has been revived on several occasions, mostly for cars with convertible roofs that are not specifically intended for racing.

Carrera Panamericana

The Carrera Panamericana was a border-to-border sedan and sports car racing event on open roads in Mexico similar to the Mille Miglia and Targa Florio in Italy. Running for five consecutive years from 1950 to 1954, it was widely held by contemporaries to be the most dangerous race of any type in the world. It has since been resurrected along some of the original course as a classic speed rally.

Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera

Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera is an Italian automobile coachbuilder. Originally established in Milan in 1925, Carrozzeria Touring became well known for both the beauty of its designs and patented superleggera construction methods. The business folded in 1966. In 2006 its brands and trademarks were purchased and a new firm established nearby to provide automotive design, engineering, coachbuilding, homologation services, non-automotive industrial design, and restoration of historic vehicles.

Carrozzeria Touring was established on 25 March 1926 by Felice Bianchi Anderloni (1882–1948) and Gaetano Ponzoni. After achieving success through the middle of the 20th century, the business began to decline as automobile manufacturers replaced body-on-frame automobile construction with monocoque design and increasingly took coachbuilding in-house.

After the original firm ceased production in 1966, Carlo Felice Bianchi Anderloni and Carrozzeria Marazzi preserved the "Touring Superleggera" trademark and used it on several occasions to support the company's heritage. The trademark was acquired by the current owner, a family business, which began conducting its activities in 2006 under the name Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera S.r.l.; the new firm is headquartered nearby Milan, its hometown.

Ferrari 195 Inter

See also the 195 S sports racerThe 195 Inter is a sportscar produced by Ferrari in 1950 as a grand tourer (GT) version of the Ferrari 195 S racer.Introduced at the 1950 Paris Motor Show, it was similar to the 166 Inter shown a year earlier and was aimed at the same affluent clientele. 27 were built in less than a year, receiving the odd-numbered chassis numbers. Out of the 28 cars, 13 were bodied by Carrozzeria Vignale, 11 by Carrozzeria Ghia, 3 by Carrozzeria Touring and 1 by Motto.The more-potent (but otherwise similar) Ferrari 212 Inter was introduced at the 1951 Paris Motor Show and replaced the 195 Inter.

Like the last of the 166 Inters, the wheelbase was stretched by 80 mm (3.1 in) to 2,500 mm (98.4 in), but the larger 2.3 L (2341 cc/142 in³) version of the Colombo V12 was the true differentiator. The engine increase was accomplished by pushing the bore from 60 to 65 mm, retaining the 58.8 mm stroke. A single Weber 36DCF carburettor was normally fitted, for a total output of 130 PS (96 kW; 128 hp) though some used triple carbs.

Ferrari 212 Export

The Ferrari 212 Export was a sports racing car produced by Ferrari in 1951 to replace the 195 S. It had a shorter wheelbase than the Ferrari 212 Inter grand tourer.

The Colombo 2,562 cc (156.3 cu in) V12 used in the Export had an 8.4:1 compression ratio, up from the 7.5:1 ratio used in the Inter. Exports were fitted with three Weber setup yielding 165 PS (121 kW) at 7,000 rpm and a top speed of 220 km/h (137 mph).Twenty-seven 212 Export models were built, most of them used in competition.In 1951, 212 Exports took the first three places in the Tour de France automobile racing event and won the Giro di Sicilia and the Giro di Toscana motor races. Carrozzeria Motto-bodied Export took third place in 1951 Mille Miglia. Same year Cornacchia and Bracco scored second place in Targa Florio

Giovanni Michelotti

Giovanni Michelotti (6 October 1921 – 23 January 1980) was one of the most prolific designers of sports cars in the 20th century. His notable contributions were for Ferrari, Lancia, Maserati and Triumph marques. He was also associated with truck designs for Leyland Motors, and with designs for British Leyland (including the Leyland National bus) after the merger of Leyland and BMC.

Born in Turin, Italy, Michelotti worked for coachbuilders, including Stabilimenti Farina, Vignale, Ghia-Aigle, Scioneri, Monterosa, Viotti and Allemano, before opening his own design studio in 1959.Towards the end of his life, asked whether he had ever designed anything other than cars, Michelotti acknowledged that virtually all of his design work had involved cars, but he admitted to having designed a coffee making machine shortly after the war.

List of sports cars

This page is a compilation of sports cars, coupés, roadsters, supercars, hypercars, race cars, and super SUVs, both discontinued and still in production. Cars that have sport trims (such as the Honda Civic SI) will be listed under the sport trims section. Production tunes will include cars modified by outside brands and then sold. This does not include in-house brands such as Ford's Special Vehicle Team, which will be included in the main list. Some vehicles are sold under different brands, therefore some vehicles may be listed more than once but usually link to the same page. Different countries/continents may also classify vehicles differently, for example; the Toyota 86 name is known throughout most of the world. However, in Europe, it's sold as the Toyota GT86, and in the United States and Canada it's sold under the Scion marque as the Scion FR-S (at least, until 2016) and the Subaru marque as the Subaru BRZ.

Mille Miglia

The Mille Miglia (Italian pronunciation: [ˈmille ˈmiʎʎa], Thousand Miles) was an open-road, motorsport endurance race established in 1927 by the young Counts Aymo Maggi and Franco Mazzotti, which took place in Italy twenty-four times from 1927 to 1957 (thirteen before the war, eleven from 1947).Like the older Targa Florio and later the Carrera Panamericana, the MM made grand tourers like Alfa Romeo, BMW, Ferrari, Maserati, Mercedes Benz and Porsche famous. The race brought out an estimated five million spectators.From 1953 until 1957, the Mille Miglia was also a round of the World Sports Car Championship.

Since 1977, the "Mille Miglia" has been reborn as a regularity race for classic and vintage cars. Participation is limited to cars, produced no later than 1957, which had attended (or were registered) to the original race. The route (Brescia–Rome round trip) is similar to that of the original race, maintaining the point of departure/arrival in Viale Venezia in Brescia.

Pininfarina

Pininfarina S.p.A. (short for Carrozzeria Pininfarina) is an Italian car design firm and coachbuilder, with headquarters in Cambiano, (Metropolitan City of Turin), Italy. It was founded by Battista "Pinin" Farina in 1930. On 14 December 2015, Mahindra Group acquired Pininfarina S.p.A. for about €168 million.Pininfarina is employed by a wide variety of automobile manufacturers to design vehicles. These firms have included long-established customers such as Ferrari, Alfa Romeo, Peugeot, Fiat, GM, Lancia, and Maserati, to emerging companies in the Asian market with Chinese manufactures like AviChina, Chery, Changfeng, Brilliance, and JAC and VinFast in Vietnam and Korean manufacturers Daewoo and Hyundai.

Since the 1980s Pininfarina has also designed high-speed trains, buses, trams, rolling stocks, automated light rail cars, people movers, yachts, airplanes, and private jets. With the 1986 creation of "Pininfarina Extra" it has consulted on industrial design, interior design, architecture, and graphic design.

Pininfarina was run by Battista's son Sergio Pininfarina until 2001, then his grandson Andrea Pininfarina until his death in 2008. After Andrea's death, his younger brother Paolo Pininfarina was appointed as CEO.At its height in 2006 the Pininfarina Group employed 2,768 with subsidiary company offices throughout Europe, as well as in Morocco and the United States. As of 2012 with the end of series automotive production, employment has shrunk to 821. Pininfarina is registered and publicly traded on the Borsa Italiana (Milan Stock Exchange).

Ferrari road car timeline, 1947–1969 — next »
Type 1940s 1950s 1960s
7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Sports 275 S 340 Mexico/MM 375 MM 375 Plus 410 S
125 S 166 S/166 MM 195 S 212 Export 225 S 250 MM 250 Monza 315 S 250 Testa Rossa 250 LM
159 S 250 S 290 MM 335 S 250  GTO
Berlinetta 250 GT "Tour de France" 250 GT "SWB" 250 GT Lusso 275 GTB 275 GTB/4 365 GTB/4
Coupé 166 Inter 195 Inter 212 Inter 250 Europa 250 Europa GT 250 GT Boano 250 GT Ellena 250 GT Coupé Pinin Farina 330 GTC 365 GTC
2+2 250 GT/E 330 GT 2+2 365 GT 2+2
Spider 250 GT Cabriolet 275 GTS 330 GTS 365 GTS
250 GT California Spyder
America 340/342 America 375 America 410 Superamerica 400 Superamerica 500 Superfast 365 California

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