Ferrari 125 S

See also the Ferrari 125 F1, a Formula One race car sharing the same engine

The Ferrari 125 S (commonly 125 or 125 Sport) was the first vehicle produced and built by automaker Ferrari of Modena, Italy. Although preceded by Enzo Ferrari's Auto Avio Costruzioni 815 of 1940, the 125 S was the first vehicle to bear the Ferrari name when it debuted on May 11, 1947[1] at the Piacenza racing circuit. Like the 815, it was a race sports car, but unlike its 8 cylinders in-line predecessor, partly developed from Fiat engine components, the 125 S featured the first true Ferrari power unit, a V12 engine (the "125"), a trait it shared with most Ferrari cars of the following decades. The 125 S was replaced by the 159 S later in 1947.

Ferrari 125 S
Ferrari 125 S
Overview
ManufacturerFerrari
Production1947
2 produced
DesignerGioacchino Colombo/Scuderia Ferrari
Body and chassis
ClassSports car
LayoutFR layout
Powertrain
Engine1.5 L (1496.77 cc) Colombo V12
Transmission5-speed manual
Dimensions
Wheelbase2,420 mm (95.3 in)
Curb weight650 kg (1,433 lb) (dry)
Chronology
PredecessorAuto Avio Costruzioni 815
SuccessorFerrari 159 S

Overview

Chassis

The 125 S used a steel tube-frame chassis[2] and had a double wishbone suspension with transverse leaf springs in front with a live axle in the rear. Hydraulic power drum brakes were specified front and rear.

Engine

The 125 S was powered by Gioacchino Colombo's 1.5 L (1497 cc/91 in³) 60° V12 with a bore/stroke of 55 x 52.5 mm . This engine produced 118 bhp (87 kW) at 6,800 rpm with a compression ratio of 9.5:1. It was a single overhead camshaft design with 2 valves per cylinder and three double-choke Weber 30DCF carburettors.

Transmission

Enzo Ferrari wanted the 125 S to use a five-speed gearbox as it matched the high revving V12 better than that of a traditional four-speed gearbox.

Examples

Both of the two 125 S cars built in 1947 were dismantled, and their parts are thought to have been re-used in production of the 159 or 166 models.

Chassis 010I

Recently, the chassis with serial number 010I was used in the restoration of a 125 S. It is rumored that 010I is actually s/n 01C. The story goes that 01C was re-stamped as 010I, and sold to a customer as a new car. Upon taking receipt of the car, the new owner immediately exclaimed, muletto!, which means "Test mule" in Italian, as he could clearly see that his supposedly new car was in fact a used, well-raced car. Ferrari made a new invoice for the car, including a considerable rebate given the car's second-hand nature.

Still in 166 Spyder Corsa configuration, the car was recently sold to Symbolic Motors. Close inspection of the chassis and its serial number led to the discovery of an old stamping that could possibly read 01C. It had been covered by an aluminum plate which bore the serial number 010I. Subsequently, the car was sold to its current owner, who refitted the chassis with a body similar to the factory's 125 S replica, which was built by Michelotto in 1987. The alleged 01C made its public debut at the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance, and was entered as a "Ferrari 125 S". The car continues to be the subject of much debate among Ferrari historians and enthusiasts; recent developments indicate that the restamped serial number was in fact a correction and not an alteration.

Racing

The 125 S debuted at the Circuito di Piacenza, driven by Franco Cortese,[3] but was unable to finish the race, despite a favorable showing against the strong Maserati 6CS 1500s.

Two weeks later, the 125 S claimed Ferrari's first victory at the Grand Prix of Rome on the Terme di Caracalla Circuit, where it was also driven by Cortese.[3] The car had spun a bearing in practice, and was repaired in the shop of Tino Martinoli, who later came to America with the Ferrari Indy car team.

The 125 S won six of its fourteen races in 1947, though drivers Clemente Biondetti and Giuseppe Navone were unable to win the 1947 Mille Miglia in it.

References

  1. ^ "Ferrari 125 S 01C". barchetta.cc. Retrieved 11 July 2019.
  2. ^ "GILCO Ferrari 125 chassis". Gilco Design. Retrieved August 10, 2006.
  3. ^ a b Lamm, John (April 1988). Dinkel, John (ed.). "The First Winner - Cortese's 1947 125 Spyder". Road & Track. Newport Beach, CA US: Diamandis Communications. 39 (8): 165. ISSN 0035-7189.
1947

1947 (MCMXLVII)

was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1947th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 947th year of the 2nd millennium, the 47th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1940s decade.

It was the first year of the Cold War, which would last until 1991, ending with the dissolution of the Soviet Union.

Auto Avio Costruzioni 815

The Auto Avio Costruzioni 815 was the first car to be fully designed and built by Enzo Ferrari. Legal issues with former associates Alfa Romeo prevented Ferrari from creating the Ferrari marque. The 815 raced at the 1940 Brescia Grand Prix, where both entries failed to finish due to engine problems. One of the cars was later scrapped, while the other is currently in a car collection in Italy.

Ferrari 125

Ferrari used their 1.5 L Colombo 125 V12 engine in two models:

1947 Ferrari 125 S

1948–1950 Ferrari 125 F1

Ferrari 159 S

Ferrari 159 S (1947) was the second Ferrari vehicle, succeeding the Ferrari 125 S that had won six of 14 races earlier in 1947. Only two 159S were built, one of these rebuilt as a Ferrari 166 Spyder Corsa, and as of 2012, the oldest remaining Ferrari.

Ferrari Colombo engine

The Ferrari Colombo Engine was a petrol fueled, water cooled, carburetted 60° V12 engine designed by Gioacchino Colombo and produced in numerous iterations by Italian automaker Ferrari between 1947 and 1988. The design team also included Giuseppe Busso and Luigi Bazzi.Colombo had formerly designed Alfa Romeos for Enzo Ferrari. These V12 powerplants ranged from the diminutive 1,497 cc (1.5 L; 91.4 cu in) unit fitted to the 125S to the 4,943 cc (4.9 L; 301.6 cu in) unit in the 1986 412i. Colombo designed bore centres at 90 mm apart. Significant updates were made in 1963 for the 330 series featuring a redesigned block with wider, 94 mm, bore spacing.Enzo Ferrari had long admired the V12 engines of Packard, Auto Union, and Alfa Romeo

(where he was long employed), but his first car, the 1940 Auto Avio Costruzioni 815, used a Fiat straight-8. Ferrari's first homegrown engine was a V12 designed by Colombo, with development continuing long after original designer Colombo had been replaced by Aurelio Lampredi as the company's marquee engine designer. Although Lampredi's engines were a real force for the company, it was Colombo's V12 which would be the primary motivator for the company's consumer products through the 1950s and 1960s.

Franco Cortese

Franco Cortese (10 February 1903 in Oggebbio, Piedmont – 13 November 1986 in Milano) was an Italian racing driver. He entered 156 races between 1927 and 1958, of which one was a Formula 1 Grand Prix and three were Formula 2 Grands Prix. Cortese holds the record of most finishes in a Mille Miglia race: fourteen.

Besides having entered many races in an Alfa Romeo, Cortese became most famous for his affiliation with Ferrari between 1947 and 1949, driving the first race car built by Ferrari in 1947, the Ferrari 125 S, which brought victories at four races in 1947. In 1950 he co-founded the Formula One team Scuderia Ambrosiana with Giovanni Lurani, Luigi Villoresi and Eugenio Minetti.

Grand tourer

A grand tourer (GT) is a car that is designed for high speed and long-distance driving, due to a combination of performance and luxury attributes. The most common format is a front-engine, rear-wheel-drive two-door coupé with either a two-seat or a 2+2 arrangement.

The term derives from the Italian language phrase gran turismo which became popular in the English language from the 1950s, evolving from fast touring cars and streamlined closed sports cars during the 1930s.

List of sports cars

This page is a compilation of sports cars, coupés, roadsters, supercars, hypercars, race cars, and super SUVs, both discontinued and still in production. Cars that have sport trims (such as the Honda Civic SI) will be listed under the sport trims section. Production tunes will include cars modified by outside brands and then sold. This does not include in-house brands such as Ford's Special Vehicle Team, which will be included in the main list. Some vehicles are sold under different brands, therefore some vehicles may be listed more than once but usually link to the same page. Different countries/continents may also classify vehicles differently, for example; the Toyota 86 name is known throughout most of the world. However, in Europe, it's sold as the Toyota GT86, and in the United States and Canada it's sold under the Scion marque as the Scion FR-S (at least, until 2016) and the Subaru marque as the Subaru BRZ.

Rome Grand Prix

The Rome Grand Prix (Italian: Gran Premio di Roma), also known as the Premio Reale di Roma (1925–1932) and Gran Premio di Roma (1947–1991), was an automobile race held in Rome, Italy from 1925 until 1991.

Through the years a number of different regulations and circuits were used, with the majority being Formula Two races at the ACI Vallelunga Circuit. In 1954 and 1963 the Rome Grand Prix was run to Formula One rules, but neither event was included in the World Championship.

The 1947 race was notable as it marked the first win for Ferrari with a car of their own construction, the Ferrari 125 S.In the late 2000s, plans were being made for a Rome Grand Prix to be added to the Formula One World Championship in 2013. A street circuit around the EUR district of Rome was to be the location of the race. However, speculation that the race would threaten the Italian Grand Prix at Monza, as well as a lack of support from local residents, led to the plans being abandoned in early 2011.

Ferrari road car timeline, 1947–1969 — next »
Type 1940s 1950s 1960s
7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Sports 275 S 340 Mexico/MM 375 MM 375 Plus 410 S
125 S 166 S/166 MM 195 S 212 Export 225 S 250 MM 250 Monza 315 S 250 Testa Rossa 250 LM
159 S 250 S 290 MM 335 S 250  GTO
Berlinetta 250 GT "Tour de France" 250 GT "SWB" 250 GT Lusso 275 GTB 275 GTB/4 365 GTB/4
Coupé 166 Inter 195 Inter 212 Inter 250 Europa 250 Europa GT 250 GT Boano 250 GT Ellena 250 GT Coupé Pinin Farina 330 GTC 365 GTC
2+2 250 GT/E 330 GT 2+2 365 GT 2+2
Spider 250 GT Cabriolet 275 GTS 330 GTS 365 GTS
250 GT California Spyder
America 340/342 America 375 America 410 Superamerica 400 Superamerica 500 Superfast 365 California
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