Fernando Viña

Fernando Viña (pronounced VEEN-ya) (born April 16, 1969) is a retired Cuban-American Major League Baseball second baseman and former MLB analyst for ESPN. His parents Andres and Olga emigrated from Cuba in the 1960s. [1]From 1993 through 2005, Viña played for the Seattle Mariners (1993), New York Mets (1994), Milwaukee Brewers (1995-1999), St. Louis Cardinals (2000-2003), and Detroit Tigers (2004).

Fernando Viña
Second baseman
Born: April 16, 1969 (age 50)
Sacramento, California
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 10, 1993, for the Seattle Mariners
Last MLB appearance
May 11, 2004, for the Detroit Tigers
MLB statistics
Batting average.282
Home runs40
Runs batted in343
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Career

A National League All-Star in 1998, Viña was a two-time Gold Glove winner (2001-2002). He was limited to 29 games for the Tigers: a serious leg injury ended his first season with Detroit, and Viña missed the entire 2005 season because of a strained right hamstring and patellar tendinitis in his left knee. Many believe Viña concealed the extent of prior injuries from the Tigers in order to obtain a lucrative contract from them, but his signing was the first of several major acquisitions that led to the Tigers' resurrection to a playoff contender.

In 2006, Viña was invited to spring training by the Seattle Mariners but was cut before the start of the season due to a labrum tear in his right hip, in effect bringing an end to his 12-year career. Viña retired with a .282 batting average, 40 home runs and 343 RBI in 1148 games played. In 2007, Viña joined ESPN as an analyst for Baseball Tonight to do about 60 shows during the 2007, 2008, and 2009 seasons. He was inducted into the Arizona State Hall of Fame in 2011 and Milwaukee Brewers Wall of Honor in 2014.Hit the 1st inside the park homerun ever in both AT&T Park and Miller Park.

Mitchell Report

On December 13, 2007, Viña was mentioned in the Mitchell Report in connection with steroid use.[2] The report cited an interview with former Mets clubhouse attendant Derek Sprang, who claimed Viña purchased anabolic steroids from him six to eight times between 2000 and 2005.[2] The two first met in 1993 when Viña was in the Mets minor league system, and indeed Viña's personal contact information was listed in Radomski's address book seized by federal agents investigating Radomski.[2] Three checks from Viña to Kirk Radomski for purchases of HGH and steroids were included in the Mitchell Report itself as further evidence of Viña's steroid use.[2] Viña later confirmed during an airing of SportsCenter that he used HGH in 2003 to recover from injuries, but denied ever using steroids or purchasing them from Radomski.[3]

Popular culture

Viña was featured in the music video for Jermaine Dupri's Welcome To Atlanta (Coast to Coast Remix) with Nelly, Murphy Lee and the St. Lunatics.

See also

References

  1. ^ Stewart, Mark (2002). Latino Baseball's Finest Fielders. 21st Century Books. p. 53. ISBN 0761325662.
  2. ^ a b c d "Mitchell report: Baseball slow to react to players' steroid use" ESPN 2007-12-13. Retrieved on 2007-12-14
  3. ^ "ESPN analyst Vina says he used HGH in 2003, but never steroids". ESPN. 2007-12-18. Retrieved 2007-12-18.

External links

1990 Major League Baseball draft

The 1990 Major League Baseball (MLB) Draft was held in June 1990. The draft placed amateur baseball players onto major league teams. 1,487 players were distributed to 26 teams. The draft consisted of first round selections, supplemental first round selections, compensation picks, and many more rounds, in fact, it went a record 101 rounds with 40 first round selections. With a league-worst record of 63 wins and 97 losses in the 1989 MLB Season, the Atlanta Braves selected shortstop, Chipper Jones out of the Bolles School with the first pick of the draft. 9 NBA and NFL players were drafted in 1990. 7 of the first 10 picks were selected directly out of high school.

1994 New York Mets season

The New York Mets' 1994 season was the 33rd regular season for the Mets. They went 55-58 and finished 3rd in the NL East. They were managed by Dallas Green. They played home games at Shea Stadium. The season was cut short by the 1994 player's strike.

1995 Milwaukee Brewers season

The Milwaukee Brewers' 1995 season involved the Brewers' finishing fourth in the American League Central with a record of 65 wins and 79 losses. The 1995 Brewers were the last Major League Baseball team to use a bullpen car, until the 2018 Arizona Diamondbacks.

1997 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1997 Milwaukee Brewers season involved the Brewers finishing third in the American League Central, eight games behind the Cleveland Indians, with a record of 78 wins and 83 losses. 1997 was the Brewers' final season in the American League, before moving to the National League for the following season.

1998 Milwaukee Brewers season

The Milwaukee Brewers' 1998 season was the first season for the franchise as a member of the National League. The Brewers finished in fifth in the NL Central, 28 games behind the Houston Astros, with a record of 74 wins and 88 losses. Before the 1998 regular season began, two new teams—the Arizona Diamondbacks and Tampa Bay Devil Rays—were added by Major League Baseball. This resulted in the American League and National League having fifteen teams. However, in order for MLB officials to continue primarily intraleague play, both leagues would need to carry a number of teams that was divisible by two, so the decision was made to move one club from the AL Central to the NL Central.

This realignment was widely considered to have great financial benefit to the club moving. However, to avoid the appearance of a conflict of interest, Commissioner (then club owner) Bud Selig decided another team should have the first chance to switch leagues. The choice was offered to the Kansas City Royals, who ultimately decided to stay in the American League. The choice then fell to the Brewers, who, on November 6, 1997, elected to move to the National League. Had the Brewers elected not to move to the National League, the Minnesota Twins would have been offered the opportunity to switch leagues.Also, Milwaukee was not totally unfamiliar with the National League, having been the home of the NL Braves for 13 seasons (1953–1965).

1999 Milwaukee Brewers season

The Milwaukee Brewers' 1999 season involved the Brewers' finishing 5th in the National League Central with a record of 74 wins and 87 losses.

2000 National League Division Series

The 2000 National League Division Series (NLDS), the opening round of the 2000 National League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 3, and ended on Sunday, October 8, with the champions of the three NL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. They were:

(1) San Francisco Giants (Western Division champions, 97–65) vs. (4) New York Mets (Wild Card, 94–68): Mets win series, 3–1.

(2) St. Louis Cardinals (Central Division champions, 95–67) vs. (3) Atlanta Braves (Eastern Division champions, 95–67): Cardinals win series, 3–0.The Cardinals and Mets went on to meet in the NL Championship Series (NLCS). The Mets beat the Cardinals four games to one to advance to the 2000 World Series, where they would face the American League champion New York Yankees. With their division rival Atlanta Braves losing to the Cardinals, the Mets' run to the World Series became much easier.

2000 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 2000 season was the team's 119th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 109th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 95-67 during the season, their best finish since 1987, and won the National League Central division by ten games over the Cincinnati Reds. In the playoffs the Cardinals defeated the Atlanta Braves 3 games to 0 in the NLDS but lost to the New York Mets 4 games to 1 in the NLCS.

The Cardinals sweep of the Braves in the NLDS was notable because it made the Mets run to their first World Series appearance since their championship season of 1986 much easier. The Braves had eliminated the Mets from the playoffs on the final day of the 1998 season and in the 1999 NLCS.Catcher Mike Matheny and outfielder Jim Edmonds won Gold Gloves this year. Matheny was acquired from the Toronto Blue Jays during the off-season, while Edmonds was acquired from the Anaheim Angels less than a week before the start of the season.

2001 National League Division Series

The 2001 National League Division Series (NLDS), the opening round of the 2001 National League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 9, and ended on Sunday, October 14, with the champions of the three NL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

(1) Houston Astros (Central Division champion, 93–69) vs. (3) Atlanta Braves (Eastern Division champion, 88–74): Braves win series, 3–0.

(2) Arizona Diamondbacks (Western Division champion, 92–70) vs. (4) St. Louis Cardinals (Wild Card, 93–69): Diamondbacks win series, 3–2.The Diamondbacks and Braves went on to meet in the NL Championship Series (NLCS). The Diamondbacks became the National League champion, and defeated the American League champion New York Yankees in the 2001 World Series.

2001 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 2001 season was the team's 120th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 110th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 93-69 during the season and finished tied for first in the National League Central division with the Houston Astros. Both the Cardinals and Astros finished five games ahead of the third-place Chicago Cubs. Because the best two teams in the National League were both from the Central Division, the Astros were awarded the NL Central champion seed in the playoffs due to a better head-to-head record, and the Cardinals were seeded as the wild-card.The Cardinals were granted the right to claim the National League Central Division Co-Championship, which they still honor today. In the playoffs the Cardinals lost to the eventual World Champion Arizona Diamondbacks 3 games to 2 in the NLDS.

Third baseman/Outfielder Albert Pujols won the Rookie of the Year Award this year, batting .329, with 37 home runs and 130 RBIs. Second baseman Fernando Viña and outfielder Jim Edmonds won Gold Gloves in 2001.

This was also Jack Buck's final season as the team's broadcaster.

2002 Major League Baseball season

The 2002 Major League Baseball season finished with two wild-card teams, the Anaheim Angels defeating the San Francisco Giants in seven games, for the World Series championship. It was the first title in Angels team history. This was the first season for mlb.tv .

2002 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 2002 season was the team's 121st season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 111th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 97-65 during the season and won the National League Central division by 13 games over the Houston Astros. In the playoffs, the Cardinals defeated the Arizona Diamondbacks 3 games to 0 in the NLDS but lost to the San Francisco Giants 4 games to 1 in the NLCS.

Second baseman Fernando Viña, shortstop Édgar Rentería, third baseman Scott Rolen, and outfielder Jim Edmonds each won Gold Gloves this year.

On June 18, long-time broadcaster Jack Buck died at the age of 77, while four days later, pitcher Darryl Kile was found dead in a Chicago hotel room, at age 33.

2004 Detroit Tigers season

The Detroit Tigers' 2004 season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Detroit Tigers attempting to win the AL Central. The team set a major league record with 11 players on the team hitting at least 10 home runs. The Tigers' 104th season ended with the team finishing in fourth place at 72-90, 29 games better than their disastrous season of the previous year. However, they were still 20 games behind the AL Central Champion Minnesota Twins.

The Tigers tied their own major league record for most home runs by a losing team when they hit seven homers in an 11–9 defeat to the Boston Red Sox on August 8.

List of ESPN personalities

Present television personalities on the ESPN network.

List of St. Louis Cardinals team records

The St. Louis Cardinals, a professional baseball franchise based in St. Louis, Missouri, compete in the National League (NL) of Major League Baseball (MLB). in 1892. Before joining the NL, they were also a charter member of the American Association (AA) from 1882 to 1891. Although St. Louis has been the Cardinals' home city for the franchise's entire existence, they were also known as the Brown Stockings, Browns, and Perfectos.

In 134 seasons, the franchise has won more than 10,000 regular season games and appeared in 27 postseasons while claiming 12 interleague championships, tying one other, and 23 league pennants. 11 of the interleague championships are World Series titles won under the modern format since 1903; the other championship and tie occurred in 1885–1886. 19 of the league pennants are NL pennants, and the other four are AA pennants. Their 11 World Series titles represent the most in the NL and are second in MLB only to the New York Yankees' 27.

Notable players have defined, in part, the Cardinals' success and history. Stan Musial owns the most career batting records with 22. Rogers Hornsby owns the most single-season records with 11. Bob Gibson owns the most career pitching records with 18. Silver King owns the most single-season pitching records with nine.

Rule 5 draft

The Rule 5 draft is a Major League Baseball player draft that occurs each year in December, at the annual Winter Meeting of general managers. The Rule 5 draft aims to prevent teams from stockpiling too many young players on their minor league affiliate teams when other teams would be willing to have them play in the majors. The Rule 5 draft is named for its place in Major League Rules. (It is sometimes erroneously referenced with a Roman numeral.) The June Rule 4 draft, known as simply "the draft", "amateur draft", or "first year player draft", is a distinctly different process in which teams select high school and college players.

Viña

Viña may refer to:

Vineyard (Viña in Spanish and Galician)

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