Ferdinand IV, King of the Romans

Ferdinand IV (8 September 1633 – 9 July 1654) was made and crowned King of Bohemia in 1646, King of Hungary and Croatia in 1647, and King of the Romans on 31 May 1653. He also served as Duke of Cieszyn.

Born in Vienna on 8 September 1633, and baptised as Ferdinand Franz, Ferdinand IV was the eldest son of Ferdinand III, Holy Roman Emperor and his first wife Maria Anna, the daughter of Philip III of Spain.[1] At a young age, Ferdinand IV took his father's role as Archduke of Austria.[2] In 1646, Ferdinand IV became King of Bohemia as he shared the role with his father Emperor Ferdinand III. He was crowned on 5 August 1646, and also shared the role of Duke of Cieszyn with Ferdinand III.[3][4] Ferdinand IV also shared the role as King of Hungary and Croatia with his father; his coronation took place on 16 June 1647 in Pressburg, present-day Slovakia.[1][3]

After the French attempted to modify the system of the election of King of the Romans, Emperor Ferdinand III made an opportunity of a recent decline in the prestige of France, and was able to install Ferdinand IV as King of the Romans, and de facto heir to the Holy Roman Empire. He was crowned in Ratisbon (Regensburg, present-day south-east Germany) on 18 June 1653 after gaining the position on 31 May 1653.[5] However, Ferdinand IV unexpectedly died of smallpox in Vienna on 9 July 1654, and was later succeeded by his brother Leopold I as King of the Romans.[1] Prior to his death, it was planned that he would marry Philip IV of Spain's daughter Maria Theresa of Spain, his cousin.[2] Upon the death of Ferdinand III, Leopold I was elected as Holy Roman Emperor.[5]

Anselmus-van-Hulle-Hommes-illustres MG 0432
Ferdinand IV by Anselm van Hulle

References

  1. ^ a b c "Ferdinand IV (King of Bohemia)". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 14 December 2013.
  2. ^ a b "Ferdinand IV: Vain hopes". The World of the Habsburgs. Retrieved 1 August 2015.
  3. ^ a b Bernard Bolingbroke Woodward; William Leist Readwin Cates (1872). Encyclopedia of Chronology: Historical and Biographical. Longmans, Green and Company. p. 512.
  4. ^ The Annals of Europe, Or Regal Register; Shewing the Succession of the Sovereigns, ... Together with the Bishops and Popes of Rome, Etc. F. Newbery. 1779. p. 165.
  5. ^ a b J. P. Cooper (20 December 1979). The New Cambridge Modern History: Volume 4, The Decline of Spain and the Thirty Years War, 1609-48/49. CUP Archive. p. 419. ISBN 978-0-521-29713-4.
  6. ^ a b Eder, Karl (1961), "Ferdinand III.", Neue Deutsche Biographie (NDB) (in German), 5, Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 85–86; (full text online)
  7. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin, von, ed. (1861). "Habsburg, Maria Anna von Spanien" . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). 7. p. 23 – via Wikisource.
  8. ^ a b Eder, Karl (1961), "Ferdinand II.", Neue Deutsche Biographie (NDB) (in German), 5, Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 83–85; (full text online)
  9. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin, von, ed. (1861). "Habsburg, Maria Anna von Bayern" . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). 7. p. 23 – via Wikisource.
  10. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin, von, ed. (1861). "Habsburg, Philipp III." . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). 7. p. 120 – via Wikisource.
  11. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin, von, ed. (1861). "Habsburg, Margaretha (Königin von Spanien)" . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). 7. p. 13 – via Wikisource.
  12. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin, von, ed. (1860). "Habsburg, Karl II. von Steiermark" . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). 6. p. 352 – via Wikisource.
  13. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin, von, ed. (1861). "Habsburg, Maria von Bayern" . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). 7. p. 20 – via Wikisource.
  14. ^ a b Sigmund Ritter von Riezler (1897), "Wilhelm V. (Herzog von Bayern)", Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (ADB) (in German), 42, Leipzig: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 717–723
  15. ^ a b Cartwright, Julia Mary (1913). Christina of Denmark, Duchess of Milan and Lorraine, 1522-1590. New York: E. P. Dutton. pp. 536–539.
  16. ^ a b Wikisource-logo.svg Kurth, Godefroid (1911). "Philip II" . In Herbermann, Charles (ed.). Catholic Encyclopedia. 12. New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  17. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin, von, ed. (1860). "Habsburg, Anna von Oesterreich (Königin von Spanien)" . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). 6. p. 151 – via Wikisource.
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Ferdinand III
King of Germany
1653–1654
with Ferdinand III
Succeeded by
Ferdinand III
King of Bohemia
1646–1654
with Ferdinand III
King of Hungary and Croatia
1647–1654
with Ferdinand III
Preceded by
Elizabeth Lucretia
Duke of Cieszyn
1653–1654
with Ferdinand III
1633

1633 (MDCXXXIII)

was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1633rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 633rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 33rd year of the 17th century, and the 4th year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1633, the Gregorian calendar was

10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1653 Imperial election

The imperial election of 1653 was an imperial election held to select the emperor of the Holy Roman Empire. It took place in Augsburg on May 31.

1654

1654 (MDCLIV)

was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1654th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 654th year of the 2nd millennium, the 54th year of the 17th century, and the 5th year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1654, the Gregorian calendar was

10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Coronation stone

A coronation stone is a stone which marks the place of coronation of a monarch. These were used in medieval Europe. Particular stones popularly believed to have been used as coronation stones still exist, though some are considered by historians to have been invented in the early modern period.

Eagle (heraldry)

The eagle is used in heraldry as a charge, as a supporter, and as a crest. The symbolism of the heraldic eagle is connected with the Roman Empire on one hand (especially in the case of the double-headed eagle), and with Saint John the Evangelist on the other.

Ernst Adalbert von Harrach

Count Ernst Adalbert von Harrach (4 November 1598 – 25 October 1667) was an Austrian Catholic Cardinal who was appointed Archbishop of Prague and Prince-Bishop of Trento. His name in Czech is Arnošt Vojtěch hrabě z Harrachu.

Ferdinand III, Holy Roman Emperor

Ferdinand III (13 July 1608 – 2 April 1657) was Holy Roman Emperor from 15 February 1637 until his death, as well as King of Hungary and Croatia, King of Bohemia and Archduke of Austria.

Giovanni Felice Sances

Giovanni Felice Sances (also Sancies, Sanci, Sanes, Sanchez, ca. 1600 – 24 November 1679) was an Italian singer and a Baroque composer. He was renowned in Europe during his time.

Sances studied at the Collegio Germanico in Rome from 1609 to 1614. He appeared in the opera Amor pudico in Rome in 1614. His career then took him to Bologna and Venice. His first opera Ermiona was staged in Padua in 1636, in which he also sang.

In 1636 he moved to Vienna, where he was initially employed at the imperial court chapel as a tenor. In 1649, during the reign of Ferdinand III he was appointed vice-Kapellmeister under Antonio Bertali. He collaborated with Bertali to stage regular performances of Italian opera. He also composed sepolcri, sacred works and chamber music.

In 1669 he succeeded to the post of Imperial Kapellmeister upon Bertali's death. From 1673, due to poor health, many of his duties were undertaken by his deputy Johann Heinrich Schmelzer. He died in Vienna in 1679.

Heir apparent

An heir apparent or heiress apparent is a person who is first in a line of succession and cannot be displaced from inheriting by the birth of another person. An heir presumptive, by contrast, is someone who is first in line to inherit a title but who can be displaced by the birth of a more eligible heir.

Today these terms most commonly describe heirs to hereditary titles (e.g. titles of nobility) or offices, especially when only inheritable by a single person. Most monarchies refer to the heir apparent of their thrones with the descriptive term of crown prince but these heirs may also be accorded with a more specific substantive title, such as Prince of Orange in the Netherlands, Duke of Brabant in Belgium, Prince of Asturias in Spain, or Prince of Wales in the United Kingdom and the other Commonwealth realms. In France the title was le Dauphin, in Imperial Russia it was Tsesarevich.The term is also used metaphorically to indicate an "anointed" successor to any position of power, e.g. a political or corporate leader.

This article primarily describes the term heir apparent in a hereditary system regulated by laws of primogeniture—as opposed to cases where a monarch has a say in naming the heir.

House of Habsburg

The House of Habsburg (; German: [ˈhaːpsbʊɐ̯k]; also spelled Hapsburg in English) and alternatively called the House of Austria (Haus Österreich in German, Casa de Austria in Spanish), was one of the most influential and distinguished royal houses of Europe. The throne of the Holy Roman Empire was continuously occupied by the Habsburgs from 1438 until their extinction in the male line in 1740. The house also produced emperors and kings of Bohemia, Hungary, Croatia, Galicia, Portugal and Spain with their respective colonies, as well as rulers of several principalities in the Netherlands and Italy. From the 16th century, following the reign of Charles V, the dynasty was split between its Austrian and Spanish branches. Although they ruled distinct territories, they nevertheless maintained close relations and frequently intermarried.

The House takes its name from Habsburg Castle, a fortress built in the 1020s in present-day Switzerland, in the canton of Aargau, by Count Radbot of Klettgau, who named his fortress Habsburg. His grandson Otto II was the first to take the fortress name as his own, adding "Count of Habsburg" to his title. The House of Habsburg gathered dynastic momentum through the 11th, 12th, and 13th centuries. In 1273, Count Radbot's seventh generation descendant Rudolph of Habsburg became Roman-German King. He moved the family's power base to the Duchy of Austria, which the Habsburgs ruled until 1918.

A series of dynastic marriages enabled the family to vastly expand its domains to include Burgundy, Spain and its colonial empire, Bohemia, Hungary, and other territories. In the 16th century, the family separated into the senior Spanish and the junior Austrian branches, who settled their mutual claims in the Oñate treaty.

The House of Habsburg became extinct in the male line in the 18th century. The senior Spanish branch ended upon the death of Charles II of Spain in 1700 and was replaced by the House of Bourbon. The remaining Austrian branch became extinct in the male line in 1740 with the death of Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI. It was succeeded by the descendants of his eldest daughter Maria Theresa's marriage to Francis III, Duke of Lorraine. The successor house styled itself formally as the House of Habsburg-Lorraine (German: Habsburg-Lothringen); because it was often still referred to as the House of Habsburg, historians use the appellation of the Habsburg Monarchy for the countries and provinces that were ruled by the family until 1918. The House of Habsburg-Lorraine continues to exist to this day and its members use the Habsburg name, for example Karl von Habsburg.

The Habsburg Empire had the advantage of size, but multiple disadvantages. There were rivals on four sides, its finances were unstable, the population was fragmented into multiple ethnicities, and its industrial base was thin. Its naval resources were so minimal that it did not attempt to build an overseas empire. It did have the advantage of good diplomats, typified by Prince Metternich; they had a grand strategy for survival that kept the empire going despite wars with the Ottomans, Frederick the Great, Napoleon and Bismarck, until the final disaster of the First World War. Along with the Capetian dynasty, it was one of the two most powerful continental European royal families, dominating European politics for nearly five centuries.

July 9

July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. 175 days remain until the end of the year.

King Ferdinand

King Ferdinand may refer to:

Ferdinand I of Aragon (1380–1416)

Ferdinand II of Aragon (1452–1516), also Ferdinand V of Castile and Leon, Ferdinand the Catholic, King of Aragon, Sicily, and Navarre, first king of a united Kingdom of Spain

Ferdinand I of León (died 1065), the Great

Ferdinand II of León (1157–1188)

Ferdinand III of Castile (c. 1200–1252), the Saint

Ferdinand IV of Castile (1285–1312), the Summoned

Ferdinand IV, King of the Romans (1633–1654), also King of Bohemia, and King of Hungary and Croatia

Ferdinand I of Naples (1423–1494)

Ferdinand II of Naples (1495–1496)

Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies (1751–1825), also Ferdinand IV of Naples, and Ferdinand III of Sicily

Ferdinand II of the Two Sicilies (1810–1856)

Ferdinand VI of Spain (1713–1759)

Ferdinand VII of Spain (1784–1833)

Ferdinand I of Romania (1865–1927)

Ferdinand I of Bulgaria (1861–1948)

Ferdinand I of Portugal (1345–1383)

Ferdinand II of Portugal (1816–1885)

Maria Anna of Spain

Infanta Maria Anna of Spain (18 August 1606 – 13 May 1646) was a Holy Roman Empress and Queen of Hungary and Bohemia by marriage to Ferdinand III, Holy Roman Emperor. She acted as regent on several occasions during the absences of her spouse.

Daughter of King Philip III of Spain and Margaret of Austria, prior to her Imperial marriage she was considered a possible wife for Charles, Prince of Wales; the event, later known in history as the "Spanish Match", provoked a domestic and political crisis in the Kingdoms of England and Scotland. In the imperial court in Vienna she continued to be strongly influenced by her native Spanish culture (from clothes to music) and also to promote the strengthening of relations between the Imperial and Spanish branches of the House of Habsburg.

Prince Ferdinand

Prince Ferdinand may refer to:

Ferdinand I of León and Castile (1017-1065)

Ferdinand II of León (1137-188)

Ferdinand, Count of Flanders (1188-1233)

Ferdinand III of Castile (1199-1252)

Prince Fernando, Lord of Serpa (after 1217 - ca. 1243)

Ferdinand de la Cerda (1253-1275)

Ferdinand IV of Castile (1285-1312)

Ferdinand I of Aragon (1380-1416)

Ferdinand the Saint Prince (1402-1443)

Ferdinand I of Naples (1423-1494)

Infante Ferdinand, Duke of Viseu (1433-1470)

Ferdinand II of Aragon (1452-1516)

Ferdinand II of Naples (1469-1496)

Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor (1503-1564)

Infante Ferdinand, Duke of Guarda and Trancoso (1507-1534)

Ferdinand, Prince of Asturias (1571-1578)

Ferdinand of Bavaria (archbishop) (1577-1650)

Ferdinand Maximilian, Hereditary Prince of Baden-Baden (1625-1669)

Ferdinand IV, King of the Romans (1633-1654)

Ferdinand VI of Spain (1713-1759)

Ferdinand, Duke of Parma (1751-1802)

Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies (1751-1825)

Ferdinand, 5th Prince Kinsky of Wchinitz and Tettau (1781-1812)

Ferdinand VII of Spain (1784-1833)

Prince Ferdinand of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (1785-1851)

Ferdinand, Hereditary Prince of Denmark (1792-1863)

Ferdinand I of Austria (1793-1875)

Prince Ferdinand Philippe, Duke of Orléans (1810-1842)

Ferdinand II of the Two Sicilies (1810-1859)

Ferdinand II of Portugal (1816-1885)

Prince Ferdinand, Duke of Genoa (1822–1855)

Ferdinand Bonaventura, 7th Prince Kinsky of Wchinitz and Tettau (1834-1904)

Prince Ferdinand, Duke of Alençon (1844-1910)

Infante Ferdinand of Portugal (1846-1861)

Ferdinand I of Bulgaria (1861-1948)

Ferdinand of Romania (1865-1927)

Prince Ferdinand Pius, Duke of Calabria (1869-1960)

Prince Ferdinand, Duke of Montpensier (1884-1924)

Prince Ferdinand of Bavaria (1884-1958)

Prince Ferdinando, Duke of Genoa (1884-1963)

Prince Ferdinand, Duke of Castro (1926-2008)

Ferdinand von Bismarck (born 1930)

Ferdinand, Hereditary Prince of Leiningen (born 1982)

Archduke Ferdinand Zvonimir of Austria (born 1997)

September 8

September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. 114 days remain until the end of the year.

Ancestors of Ferdinand IV, King of the Romans
16. Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor[12]
8. Charles II, Archduke of Inner Austria[8]
17. Anne of Bohemia and Hungary[12]
4. Ferdinand II, Holy Roman Emperor[6]
18. Albert V, Duke of Bavaria[13] (= 20, 30)
9. Maria Anna of Bavaria[8] (= 15, ≠ 5)
19. Anna of Austria[13] (= 21, 31)
2. Ferdinand III, Holy Roman Emperor
20. Albert V, Duke of Bavaria[14] (= 18, 30)
10. William V, Duke of Bavaria[9]
21. Anna of Austria[14] (= 19, 31)
5. Maria Anna of Bavaria[6] (≠ 9, 15)
22. Francis I, Duke of Lorraine[15]
11. Renata of Lorraine[9]
23. Christina of Denmark[15]
1. Ferdinand IV, King of the Romans
24. Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor[16]
12. Philip II of Spain[10]
25. Isabella of Portugal[16]
6. Philip III of Spain[7]
26. Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor[17]
13. Anna of Austria[10]
27. Maria of Austria[17]
3. Maria Anna of Austria
28. Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor (= 16)
14. Charles II, Archduke of Inner Austria[11] (= 8)
29. Anne of Bohemia and Hungary (= 17)
7. Margaret of Austria[7]
30. Albert V, Duke of Bavaria (= 18, 20)
15. Maria Anna of Bavaria[11] (= 9, ≠ 5)
31. Anna of Austria (= 19, 21)
1st generation
2nd generation
3rd generation
4th generation
5th generation
6th generation
7th generation
8th generation
9th generation
10th generation
11th generation
12th generation
13th generation
14th generation
15th generation
16th generation
17th generation
18th generation
19th generation
House of Árpád
House of Přemysl
House of Wittelsbach
Capetian House of Anjou
House of Luxembourg
House of Habsburg
House of Jagiellon
House of Hunyadi
House of Jagiellon
House of Zápolya
House of Habsburg
House of Habsburg-Lorraine

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.