February 3

February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 331 days remain until the end of the year (332 in leap years).

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Events

Births

Deaths

Holidays and observances

References

  1. ^ Zak, Anatoly. "Soviet probe makes world's first soft landing on the Moon". Russian Space Web. Retrieved February 1, 2018.
  2. ^ Wilbur R. Miller (July 20, 2012). The Social History of Crime and Punishment in America: An Encyclopedia. SAGE Publications. p. 1110. ISBN 978-1-4833-0593-6.
  3. ^ Marlene Bradford; Robert S. Carmichael; Tracy Irons-Georges (January 1, 2001). Natural Disasters: Avalanches-explosions. Salem Press. p. 58. ISBN 978-0-89356-072-0.
  4. ^ "STS-60: A Cosmonaut Flies on the Shuttle". NASA History Program Office. NASA. Retrieved February 1, 2018.
  5. ^ businessinsider.com/theranos-founder-ceo-elizabeth-holmes-life-story-bio-2018-4
  6. ^ Julie Adams, Damsel in Distress in 'Creature From the Black Lagoon,' Dies at 92
  7. ^ "Kristoff St. John Dead Young and the Restless Star Dies at 52". GlobalNews.

External links

21 Savage

Shéyaa Bin Abraham-Joseph (born October 22, 1992), known by his stage name 21 Savage, is a rapper, songwriter, and record producer based in Atlanta, Georgia. He became known in Atlanta for the 2015 mixtape The Slaughter Tape before attaining nationwide attention following an extended play collaboration Savage Mode (2016) with the producer Metro Boomin and its popular singles "X" and "No Heart", as well as a guest feature on the 2016 Drake single "Sneakin'".21 Savage released his debut studio album, Issa Album, on July 7, 2017. It debuted at number two on the Billboard 200 and gave him his first Billboard Hot 100 top 20 song, "Bank Account". His first number one single came at the end of 2017 with his feature on Post Malone's "Rockstar", which was nominated in two categories at the 61st Grammy Awards. On October 31, 2017, he released the Offset and Metro Boomin collaboration Without Warning. In December 2018, he released his second album, I Am > I Was, which debuted at number one on the Billboard 200 and stayed at number one for two consecutive weeks.On February 3, 2019, 21 Savage was arrested by the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), officials of which stated that he is a citizen of the United Kingdom who entered the U.S. in July 2005 and then unlawfully overstayed his visa when it expired in July 2006. He was granted bond on February 12 and released the next day, pending the outcome of an expedited deportation hearing. The hearing was initially scheduled for April 9, but was later postponed indefinitely.

2K Games

2K Games, Inc. (commonly referred to as 2K) is an American video game publisher based in Novato, California. The company and its 2K Sports division were founded in January 2005 by Christoph Hartmann, David Ismailer, Jason Argent and Greg Thomas, as a subsidiary of Take-Two Interactive. 2K is Take-Two Interactive's second publishing label, after Rockstar Games, and houses all of Take-Two Interactive's development studios, apart from Social Point and those suborganized under Rockstar Games.

420 (cannabis culture)

420, 4:20, or 4/20 (pronounced four-twenty) is slang in cannabis culture for the consumption of cannabis, especially smoking cannabis around the time 4:20 p.m. and also refers to cannabis-oriented celebrations that take place annually on April 20 (which is 4/20 in U.S. form).

Ansel Elgort

Ansel Elgort (born March 14, 1994) is an American actor, singer, and DJ (under the name Ansølo). Born to photographer Arthur Elgort and stage producer Grethe Barrett Holby, he began his acting career with a supporting role in the horror film Carrie (2013).

Elgort gained wider recognition for starring as a cancer patient in the romantic teen drama The Fault in Our Stars (2014) and for his role in The Divergent Series franchise. In 2017, he played the title character in Edgar Wright's action thriller Baby Driver, for which he received a Golden Globe Award nomination for Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy. As a singer, he has released the singles "Thief" (2017) and "Supernov@" (2018).

Baseball

Baseball is a bat-and-ball game played between two opposing teams who take turns batting and fielding. The game proceeds when a player on the fielding team, called the pitcher, throws a ball which a player on the batting team tries to hit with a bat. The objectives of the offensive team (batting team) are to hit the ball into the field of play, and to run the bases—having its runners advance counter-clockwise around four bases to score what are called "runs". The objective of the defensive team (fielding team) is to prevent batters from becoming runners, and to prevent runners' advance around the bases. A run is scored when a runner legally advances around the bases in order and touches home plate (the place where the player started as a batter). The team that scores the most runs by the end of the game is the winner.

The first objective of the batting team is to have a player reach first base safely. A player on the batting team who reaches first base without being called "out" can attempt to advance to subsequent bases as a runner, either immediately or during teammates' turns batting. The fielding team tries to prevent runs by getting batters or runners "out", which forces them out of the field of play. Both the pitcher and fielders have methods of getting the batting team's players out. The opposing teams switch back and forth between batting and fielding; the batting team's turn to bat is over once the fielding team records three outs. One turn batting for each team constitutes an inning. A game is usually composed of nine innings, and the team with the greater number of runs at the end of the game wins. If scores are tied at the end of nine innings, extra innings are usually played. Baseball has no game clock, although most games end in the ninth inning.

Baseball evolved from older bat-and-ball games already being played in England by the mid-18th century. This game was brought by immigrants to North America, where the modern version developed. By the late 19th century, baseball was widely recognized as the national sport of the United States. Baseball is popular in North America and parts of Central and South America, the Caribbean, and East Asia, particularly in Japan, Taiwan, and South Korea.

In the United States and Canada, professional Major League Baseball (MLB) teams are divided into the National League (NL) and American League (AL), each with three divisions: East, West, and Central. The MLB champion is determined by playoffs that culminate in the World Series. The top level of play is similarly split in Japan between the Central and Pacific Leagues and in Cuba between the West League and East League. The World Baseball Classic, organized by the World Baseball Softball Confederation, is the major international competition of the sport and attracts the top national teams from around the world.

Ezekiel Elliott

Ezekiel Elijah Elliott (born July 22, 1995) is an American football running back for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Ohio State, where he earned second-team All-America honors in 2015. He was drafted by the Cowboys fourth overall in the 2016 NFL Draft. In his first NFL season, he led the league in rushing yards and was invited to the Pro Bowl.

Hollaback Girl

"Hollaback Girl" is a song by American singer Gwen Stefani from her debut solo studio album, Love. Angel. Music. Baby. (2004). As part of Stefani's vision of creating "a silly dance record", "Hollaback Girl" is a hip hop song that draws influence from 1980s hip hop and dance music. The song was written by Stefani, Pharrell Williams and Chad Hugo, supposedly as a response to Courtney Love's statement that Stefani was a "cheerleader" in an interview with Seventeen magazine. The song was released as the album's third single on March 15, 2005, and was one of the year's most popular songs, peaking inside the top 10 of the majority of the charts it entered. It reached number one in Australia and the United States, where it became the first digital download to sell one million copies.

"Hollaback Girl" received several award nominations, including Best Female Pop Vocal Performance and Record of the Year at the 48th Grammy Awards, but lost in both categories. "Hollaback Girl" divided pop music critics, with some praising its minimalistic production and others declaring it embarrassing; men's magazine Maxim called it the "Most Annoying Song Ever". In the United States, it topped the Billboard Hot 100 for four weeks and was ranked at number two on the Year-End Hot 100. The single topped the charts in Australia and reached the top-ten in several other countries, including Ireland, Italy, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. It has since been certified Platinum in United States by the RIAA, and in Australia by ARIA.

A music video representing Stefani as a cheerleader at a California high school was released on March 21, 2005, and was directed by Paul Hunter. The video received four nominations at the 2005 MTV Video Music Awards, and ultimately won for Best Choreography. Stefani has performed "Hollaback Girl" on numerous occasions, including on all three of her concert tours, and on several televised appearances.

Joe Rogan

Joseph James Rogan (; born August 11, 1967) is an American stand-up comedian, mixed martial arts (MMA) color commentator, podcast host, businessman and former television host and actor.

Rogan began a career in comedy in August 1988 in the Boston area. After relocating to Los Angeles in 1994, Rogan signed an exclusive developmental deal with Disney and appeared as an actor on several television shows including Hardball and NewsRadio. In 1997, he started working for the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) as an interviewer and color commentator. Rogan released his first comedy special in 2000. In 2001, Rogan put his comedy career on hold after becoming the host of Fear Factor and would resume his stand-up career shortly after the show's end in 2006. In 2009, Rogan launched his podcast The Joe Rogan Experience.

List of signature songs

A signature song is the one song (or, in some cases, one of a few songs) that a popular and well-established recording artist or band is most closely identified with or best known for. This is generally differentiated from a one-hit wonder in that the artist usually has success with other songs as well. There have also been instances where an actor has acquired a signature song by giving a popular vocal performance in a film. Signature songs can be the result of spontaneous public identification, or a marketing tool developed by the music industry to promote artists, sell their recordings, and develop a fan base. Artists and bands with a signature song are often expected to perform it at every concert appearance, usually as an encore on concert tours.

Nancy Pelosi

Nancy Patricia Pelosi (; née D'Alesandro; born March 26, 1940) is an American politician serving as speaker of the United States House of Representatives since January 2019. First elected to Congress in 1987, she is the only woman to have served as speaker, and is the highest-ranking elected woman in United States history. Pelosi is second in the presidential line of succession, immediately after the vice president.A member of the Democratic Party, Pelosi is in her 17th term as a congresswoman, representing California's 12th congressional district (since 2013), which consists of four-fifths of the city and county of San Francisco. She initially represented the 5th district (1987–1993), and then, when district boundaries were redrawn after the 1990 Census, the 8th district (1993–2013). She has led House Democrats since 2003 (the first woman to lead a party in Congress), serving twice each as Speaker (2007–2011 and 2019–present) and as House Minority Leader (2003–2007 and 2011–2019) depending upon whether Democrats or Republicans held the majority; she has also served as House Minority Whip (2002–2003).

Pelosi was a major opponent of the Iraq War as well as the Bush Administration's 2005 attempt to privatize Social Security. During her first speakership, she was instrumental in the passage of many landmark bills, including the Affordable Care Act, the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, the Don't Ask, Don't Tell Repeal Act, along with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and 2010 Tax Relief Act, which served as economic stimulus amidst the Great Recession.

In the 2018 midterm elections, the Democrats won control of the House. Afterward, when the 116th Congress convened on January 3, 2019, Pelosi was elected Speaker for the second time, becoming the first former speaker to return to the post since Sam Rayburn in 1955.

New York Islanders

The New York Islanders are a professional ice hockey team based in the New York metropolitan area. They are members of the Metropolitan Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). The team splits its home games between Barclays Center in the borough of Brooklyn and Nassau Coliseum in Uniondale, New York. The Islanders are one of three NHL franchises in the New York metropolitan area, along with the New Jersey Devils and New York Rangers, and their fan base resides primarily on Long Island.

The team was founded in 1972 as part of the NHL's maneuvers to keep a team from rival league World Hockey Association (WHA) out of the newly built Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum in suburban Uniondale, New York. After two years of building up the team's roster, they found almost instant success by securing fourteen straight playoff berths starting with their third season. The Islanders won four consecutive Stanley Cup championships between 1980 and 1983, the seventh of eight dynasties recognized by the NHL in its history. Their 19 consecutive playoff series wins between 1980 and 1984 is a feat that remains unparalleled in the history of professional sports. They are the last team in any major professional North American sport to win four consecutive championships.

Following the team's dynasty era, the franchise ran into problems with money, ownership and management, an aging arena, and low attendance. Their woes were reflected on the ice, as the team has not won a division title since 1987–88, and went 22 seasons without winning a playoff series prior to the 2016 playoffs. After years of failed attempts to rebuild or replace Nassau Coliseum in suburban Long Island, the Islanders relocated to Barclays Center following the 2014–15 season. In the 2018–19 season the Islanders started splitting their home games between the Barclays Center and Nassau Coliseum until their new arena near Belmont Park is opened in 2021.

Eight former members of the Islanders have been inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, seven of whom—Al Arbour, Mike Bossy, Clark Gillies, Denis Potvin, Billy Smith, Bill Torrey, and Bryan Trottier—were members of all four Cup-winning teams. Pat LaFontaine is the most recent inductee, having been honored in 2003.

Pixies

The Pixies are an American alternative rock band formed in 1986 in Boston, Massachusetts. The original line-up was composed of Black Francis (vocals, rhythm guitar), Joey Santiago (lead guitar), Kim Deal (bass, backing vocals) and David Lovering (drums). The band disbanded acrimoniously in 1993, but reunited in 2004. After Deal left in 2013, the Pixies hired Kim Shattuck as a touring bassist; she was replaced the same year by Paz Lenchantin, who became a permanent member in 2016.

The Pixies are associated with the 1990s alternative rock boom, and draw on elements including punk rock and surf rock. Their music is known for its dynamic "loud-quiet" shifts and song structures. Francis is the Pixies' primary songwriter; his often surreal lyrics cover offbeat subjects such as extraterrestrials, incest, and biblical violence. They achieved modest popularity in their home country, but were more successful in the United Kingdom and mainland Europe. Their jarring pop sound influenced bands such as Nirvana, Radiohead, Bush, Blur and Weezer. Their popularity grew in the years following their break-up, leading to sold-out world tours following their reunion in 2004.

Ritchie Valens

Richard Steven Valenzuela (May 13, 1941 – February 3, 1959), known professionally as Ritchie Valens, was a Mexican American singer, songwriter, and guitarist. A rock and roll pioneer and a forefather of the Chicano rock movement, Valens' recording career lasted eight months and abruptly ended when he died in a plane crash.During this time, he had several hits, most notably "La Bamba", which he had adapted from a Mexican folk song. Valens transformed the song into one with a rock rhythm and beat, and it became a hit in 1958, making Valens a pioneer of the Spanish-speaking rock and roll movement. He also had the American number 2 hit ''Donna''.

On February 3, 1959, on what has become known as "The Day the Music Died", Valens died in a plane crash in Iowa, an accident that also claimed the lives of fellow musicians Buddy Holly and J. P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson, as well as pilot Roger Peterson. Valens was posthumously inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2001.

Santa Clarita Diet

Santa Clarita Diet is an American horror-comedy web television series created by Victor Fresco for the streaming service Netflix, starring Drew Barrymore and Timothy Olyphant. Fresco serves as the showrunner, and is an executive producer alongside Drew Barrymore, Timothy Olyphant, Aaron Kaplan, Tracy Katsky, Chris Miller, Ember Truesdell and Ruben Fleischer.The single-camera series premiered on February 3, 2017. The first season, consisting of 10 episodes, has received generally positive reviews. On March 29, 2017, it was announced that Netflix renewed the series for a second season, which premiered on March 23, 2018. On May 8, 2018, the series was renewed for a 10-episode third season and premiered on March 29, 2019.

Super Bowl LIII

Super Bowl LIII was an American football game played to determine the champion of the National Football League (NFL) for the 2018 season. The American Football Conference (AFC) champion New England Patriots defeated the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Los Angeles Rams, 13–3. The game was played on February 3, 2019 at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia. This was the first Super Bowl played at that stadium, and the third one held in Atlanta.

The Patriots' victory was their sixth, tying the Pittsburgh Steelers for the most Super Bowl championships. New England, after finishing the regular season with a 11–5 record, advanced to their 11th Super Bowl appearance, their fourth in five years, and their ninth under the leadership of head coach Bill Belichick and quarterback Tom Brady. The Rams, who finishing the regular season with a 13–3 record under 30-year-old head coach Sean McVay and second-year quarterback Jared Goff, made their fourth Super Bowl appearance overall, and their first one since moving back from St. Louis to Los Angeles in 2016. Super Bowl LIII thus was a rematch of Super Bowl XXXVI, a 20–17 Patriots win over the Rams that gave the Belichick–Brady head coach–quarterback tandem their first Super Bowl championship. With the Rams now playing in Los Angeles instead of St. Louis, Super Bowl LIII marked the first Super Bowl appearance of a Los Angeles-based team since the Raiders' victory in Super Bowl XVIII, and the 13th meeting in a major sports championship between the Los Angeles and Greater Boston areas.

Super Bowl LIII was the lowest-scoring Super Bowl in history, eclipsing the previous record of 14–7 held by Super Bowl VII, and the lowest-scoring league championship contest since a 14–0 score was recorded during the 1949 NFL Championship Game. It also marked the first Super Bowl with no touchdowns scored by either team in the first three quarters, as the Patriots and the Rams held the contest to a 3–3 tie as they entered the fourth quarter. New England then scored 10 unanswered points for the victory, as their lone touchdown tied them with the New York Jets in Super Bowl III for the fewest touchdowns by a winning Super Bowl team. The Rams ended up as only the second losing team to not score a touchdown, tying the Miami Dolphins in Super Bowl VI. Patriots wide receiver Julian Edelman, who caught 10 passes for 141 yards, was named Super Bowl MVP.The broadcast of the game on CBS had the smallest Super Bowl audience in 10 years. The halftime show was headlined by U.S. pop group Maroon 5, joined by rappers Big Boi and Travis Scott as guests.

Super Bowl XLVIII

Super Bowl XLVIII was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Denver Broncos and National Football Conference (NFC) champion Seattle Seahawks to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 2013 season. The Seahawks defeated the Broncos 43–8, the largest margin of victory for an underdog and tied for the third largest point differential overall (35) in Super Bowl history with Super Bowl XXVII (1993). It was the first time the winning team scored over 40 points, while holding their opponent to under 10. This became the first Super Bowl victory for the Seahawks and the fifth Super Bowl loss for the Broncos, tied with the New England Patriots for the most of any team. The game was played on February 2, 2014 at MetLife Stadium at the Meadowlands Sports Complex in East Rutherford, New Jersey, the first Super Bowl played outdoors in a cold-weather city and the first Super Bowl to be played on February 2.This marked the third time the number one seed from each conference met in the league championship, joining Super Bowl XXVIII (1994) and Super Bowl XLIV (2010). The Seahawks posted a 13–3 record and were making their second Super Bowl appearance in eight years. The Broncos were making their seventh Super Bowl appearance after also posting a 13–3 record. The game also featured the league's top offense (Denver) against the top defense (Seattle), the first time this occurred since Super Bowl XXXVII (2003). This also marked the only time that two former divisional rivals met in a Super Bowl, as the Seahawks and Broncos were in the same division from 1978 to 2001.

Seattle built a 22–0 halftime lead, and then a 36–0 advantage before allowing Denver's first and only score on the final play of the third quarter. The Seahawks defense scored a safety on the first play from scrimmage (coincidentally, the final play from scrimmage of the previous Super Bowl was also a safety), the quickest score in Super Bowl history at 12 seconds. They also became the first team in a Super Bowl to score on a safety, a kickoff return for a touchdown (12 seconds into the second half), and an interception return for a touchdown. The Broncos were held to almost 30 points below their scoring average. Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning, a five-time NFL Most Valuable Player (MVP) award winner, threw two interceptions in the first half. Seahawks linebacker Malcolm Smith, who returned one of those interceptions 69 yards for a touchdown, recovered a fumble and made nine tackles, was named Super Bowl MVP.In the United States, the game was televised by Fox; with an average audience of 111.5 million viewers, and peaking at 115.3 million during the halftime show featuring Bruno Mars, the game was briefly the most-watched U.S. television broadcast of all time, until it was surpassed the following year. The game's inaugural Spanish-language telecast on Fox Deportes was also the highest-rated Spanish-language cable telecast outside of soccer.

The Day the Music Died

On February 3, 1959, American rock and roll musicians Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and "The Big Bopper" J. P. Richardson were killed in a plane crash near Clear Lake, Iowa, together with pilot Roger Peterson. The event later became known as "The Day the Music Died", after singer-songwriter Don McLean referred to it as such in his 1971 song "American Pie".

At the time, Holly and his band, consisting of Waylon Jennings, Tommy Allsup, and Carl Bunch, were playing on the "Winter Dance Party" tour across the Midwest. Rising artists Valens, Richardson and Dion and the Belmonts had joined the tour as well. The long journeys between venues on board the cold, uncomfortable tour buses adversely affected the performers, with cases of flu and even frostbite. After stopping at Clear Lake to perform, and frustrated by such conditions, Holly chose to charter a plane to reach their next venue in Moorhead, Minnesota. Richardson, who had the flu, swapped places with Jennings, taking his seat on the plane, while Allsup lost his seat to Valens on a coin toss.

Soon after takeoff, late at night and in poor, wintry weather conditions, the pilot lost control of the light aircraft, a Beechcraft Bonanza, which subsequently crashed into a cornfield. Everyone on board was killed. The event has since been mentioned in various songs and films. A number of monuments have been erected at the crash site and in Clear Lake, where an annual memorial concert is also held at the Surf Ballroom, the venue that hosted the artists' last performance.

Todd Gurley

Todd Gerome Gurley II (born August 3, 1994) is an American football running back for the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Georgia where he earned All-SEC honors in 2012 and 2013. Gurley was drafted by the Rams with the tenth overall pick in the 2015 NFL Draft. Despite missing three games due to a torn ACL suffered during his junior year at Georgia, Gurley rushed for 1,106 yards in his rookie season and was voted Offensive Rookie of the Year by the Associated Press. He was named NFL Offensive Player of the Year by the Associated Press following the 2017 season after gaining 19 offensive touchdowns.

Warren Beatty

Henry Warren Beatty (né Beaty; born March 30, 1937) is an American actor and filmmaker. He has been nominated for fourteen Academy Awards – four for Best Actor, four for Best Picture, two for Best Director, three for Original Screenplay, and one for Adapted Screenplay – winning Best Director for Reds (1981). Beatty is the only person to have been nominated for acting in, directing, writing, and producing the same film, and he did so twice: first for Heaven Can Wait (with Buck Henry as co-director), and again with Reds.Eight of the films he has produced have earned 53 Academy nominations, and in 1999, he was awarded the Academy's highest honor, the Irving G. Thalberg Award. Beatty has been nominated for eighteen Golden Globe Awards, winning six, including the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, which he was honored with in 2007. Among his Golden Globe-nominated films are Splendor in the Grass (1961), his screen debut, and Bonnie and Clyde (1967), Shampoo (1975), Heaven Can Wait (1978), Reds (1981), Dick Tracy (1990), Bugsy (1991), Bulworth (1998) and Rules Don't Apply (2016), all of which he also produced.

Director and collaborator Arthur Penn described Beatty as "the perfect producer", adding, "He makes everyone demand the best of themselves. Warren stays with a picture through editing, mixing and scoring. He plain works harder than anyone else I have ever seen."

Months and days of the year
January
February
March
April
May
June
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August
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October
November
December

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