Fayetteville, West Virginia

Fayetteville is a town in and the county seat of Fayette County, West Virginia, United States.[6] The population was 2,892 at the 2010 census.

Fayetteville was listed as one of the 2006 "Top 10 Coolest Small Towns in America" by Budget Travel Magazine,[7] and as "Best River Town 2013" by Blue Ridge Outdoors magazine.[8]

Fayetteville, West Virginia
Court Street in downtown Fayetteville
Court Street in downtown Fayetteville
Location of Fayetteville in Fayette County, West Virginia.
Location of Fayetteville in Fayette County, West Virginia.
Coordinates: 38°3′4″N 81°6′25″W / 38.05111°N 81.10694°WCoordinates: 38°3′4″N 81°6′25″W / 38.05111°N 81.10694°W
CountryUnited States
StateWest Virginia
CountyFayette
Area
 • Total5.47 sq mi (14.17 km2)
 • Land5.46 sq mi (14.14 km2)
 • Water0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation
1,818 ft (554 m)
Population
 • Total2,892
 • Estimate 
(2016)[5]
2,852
 • Density529.7/sq mi (204.5/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
25840
Area code(s)304
FIPS code54-27028[3]
GNIS feature ID1538910[4]

History

Fayetteville was founded by Abraham Vandal, a Revolutionary War veteran and local farmer. The town was originally named Vandalia. The Fayette County Courthouse is located on part of the original Vandal farm. The town’s name was later (prior to 1837) changed to Fayetteville after the Revolutionary War hero, Marquis de Lafayette who toured the US in 1824–25.

During the Civil War, the majority of the people in Fayetteville were in sympathy with the Southern cause. With neighboring counties being predominately Unionist, however, Fayetteville changed hands several times during the war and was partially destroyed during the fighting.

In 1897, the Fayette County Courthouse was completed and is a remarkable example of the Romanesque Revival architectural style. The Altamont Hotel was built the same year. Both are listed on the National Register of Historic Places, along with the E. B. Hawkins House. The Fayetteville Historic District was designated in 1990.[9]

Fayetteville grew rapidly in the late 19th century thanks mainly to the coal industry. The mining industry declined in the late 20th century. Fayetteville’s economy now is almost completely based on the tourism industry. Popular activities include white water rafting, fishing, mountain biking, and rock climbing in the region. Also, the New River Gorge Bridge hosts annual celebration, "Bridge Day," which is held on the third Saturday of October.

The New River Gorge Bridge is the longest arch bridge in the western hemisphere; its creation made traveling on US 19 much easier, turning a 45-minute sojourn from one side of the gorge to the other into a roughly 45-second jaunt. The New River is one of the five oldest major rivers in the world.

Geography

Fayetteville is located at 38°3′4″N 81°6′25″W / 38.05111°N 81.10694°W (38.051181, -81.106961).[10]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 5.47 square miles (14.17 km2), of which, 5.46 square miles (14.14 km2) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water.[1]

Located less than a mile away from Fayetteville is the New River Gorge, which attracts outdoor recreation enthusiasts. The scenic cliffs that line the New River Gorge are popular for rock climbing. The New River offers Class I-IV whitewater rafting and kayaking. Hiking and biking trails in the area are also available. The New River Gorge National River, managed by the U.S. National Park Service, operates a visitors center and offers many educational programs in the area.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900413
191067162.5%
1920659−1.8%
19301,14373.4%
19401,34717.8%
19501,95244.9%
19601,848−5.3%
19701,712−7.4%
19802,36638.2%
19902,182−7.8%
20002,75426.2%
20102,8925.0%
Est. 20162,852[5]−1.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]
FayetteCtyCourthouse FayettevilleWV
Fayette County Courthouse

2010 census

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 2,892 people, 1,245 households, and 813 families residing in the town. The population density was 529.7 inhabitants per square mile (204.5/km2). There were 1,366 housing units at an average density of 250.2 per square mile (96.6/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 95.8% White, 3.0% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.1% from other races, and 0.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.6% of the population.

There were 1,245 households of which 26.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.0% were married couples living together, 12.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 34.7% were non-families. 29.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 2.79.

The median age in the town was 44.4 years. 19.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.3% were from 25 to 44; 30.9% were from 45 to 64; and 18.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 48.3% male and 51.7% female.

2000 census

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 2,754 people, 1,151 households, and 766 families residing in the town. The population density was 934.8 people per square mile (360.4/km²). There were 1,257 housing units at an average density of 426.7 per square mile (164.5/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 94.88% White, 4.58% African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.04% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.18% from other races, and 0.15% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.62% of the population.

There were 1,151 households out of which 27.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.2% were married couples living together, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.4% were non-families. 29.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 2.82.

In the town, the population was spread out with 20.4% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 26.1% from 25 to 44, 26.4% from 45 to 64, and 20.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females, there were 84.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.3 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $35,043, and the median income for a family was $44,444. Males had a median income of $35,603 versus $20,909 for females. The per capita income for the town was $18,710. About 9.5% of families and 11.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.7% of those under age 18 and 16.1% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people

  • Tunney Hunsaker - Professional boxer and longtime Fayetteville police chief
  • The five Sodder children – Pronounced dead after a fire destroyed the family home on Christmas Eve 1945, their parents and all but one surviving sibling came to believe they had instead disappeared. They erected a billboard on the outskirts of town to publicize the reward they offered for information that would resolve the case.

References

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 24, 2012. Retrieved 2013-01-24.
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-24.
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  6. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 10, 2015. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  7. ^ Fayetteville, West Virginia | Travel Deals, Travel Tips, Travel Advice, Vacation Ideas | Budget Travel
  8. ^ Best River Town 2013: Fayetteville, West Virginia
  9. ^ National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  11. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.

External links

Altamont Hotel

Altamont Hotel is a historic hotel located at Fayetteville, Fayette County, West Virginia. It was built in 1897-1898, and is a 2 1/2 story, "T"-shaped brick building on a raised basement. It features a gently sloping hipped roof and wraparound Victorian verandah. In the 1930s, it was adapted for apartment use.It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.

Blue moon (ice cream)

Blue moon is an ice cream flavor with bright blue coloring, available in the Upper Midwest of the United States and possibly originating in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The Chicago Tribune has described the ice cream as "Smurf-blue, marshmallow-sweet, and tasting remarkably like Froot Loops and Fruity Pebbles". Blue moon ice cream is one of the flavors that makes up Superman ice cream in certain states.Blue moon is found mainly in Virginia, Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin, and Ohio. It is found less frequently in Minnesota; Missouri, North Dakota; Indiana; Iowa; Illinois; and Erie, Pennsylvania, and has reportedly been available (either in the past or currently) in California; Colorado; Utah; Missouri; Western Pennsylvania; Tennessee; upstate and central New York; Houston; Nebraska; Wyoming; Arizona; Seattle; Charleston and Fayetteville, West Virginia, and as far south as Bradenton, Florida. Kilwins also provides this flavor in various states. A similar flavor has also been sold in Italy as well as Malta under the name "puffo", which is Italian for "Smurf", as well as in Germany under the name "Engelblau", which translates to "angel blue", in France as "schtroumpf" ("Smurf") and Slovenia under the name "modro nebo" which translates to "blue sky".

Brandi Alexander

Brandi Alexander (born March 1, 1974) is a professional wrestler. During her decade long plus career, she has wrestled in many wrestling federations, such as World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE), World Championship Wrestling (WCW), National Wrestling Alliance (NWA), American Wrestling Association (AWA), World League Wrestling (WLW), Professional Girl Wrestling Association (PGWA), World Wrestling Council (WWC), Carolina Wrestling Federation (CWF), FWA, and LAW.

Cassius Clay vs. Tunney Hunsaker

Olympic Light heavyweight boxing champion Cassius Clay (later Muhammad Ali) fought Tunney Hunsaker in a six-round match on October 29, 1960. Clay won the bout through a unanimous decision on points. This was Ali's first fight as a professional. Hunsaker was a part time boxer who was for many years a respected police officer in Fayetteville, West Virginia. He also helped to train young fighters and he and Ali were friends for many years afterwards. In a 1980 Sports Illustrated article, Hunsaker said he didn't agree with Ali refusing to be drafted during the Vietnam war, but he still respected him greatly as a fighter and as a man.

E. B. Hawkins House

E. B. Hawkins House, also known as the Hawkins-Ballard House, is a historic mansion located at Fayetteville, Fayette County, West Virginia. It was built in 1905-1906, and is a 12,000-square-foot (1,100 m2) clapboard and shingle-sided dwelling in a modified Colonial Revival style. It features gambrel roofs and rambling porches. Also on the property are a guest house (c. 1918), garage (c. 1910), barn (c. 1905-1906), and frame cottage (c. 1918). It is now known as the Historic White Horse Bed and Breakfast.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1990.

Fayette County Courthouse (West Virginia)

Fayette County Courthouse is a historic courthouse located at Fayetteville, Fayette County, West Virginia. It was built in 1894-1895, and is a 2 1/2 story, five bay wide, rectangular building with projecting wings. The basement level is built of sandstone and faced in ashlar. Above that, the walls are of brick. It features a square tower with pyramidal roof.It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.

Fayetteville

Fayetteville may refer to:

Fayetteville, Alabama

Fayetteville, Arkansas, the Fayetteville with the greatest metropolitan population

The Fayetteville Formation

Fayetteville, Georgia

Fayetteville, Illinois

Fayetteville, Indiana

Fayetteville, Washington County, Indiana

Fayetteville, Missouri

Fayetteville, New York

Fayetteville, North Carolina, the Fayetteville with the greatest city population

Fayetteville, Ohio

Fayetteville, Pennsylvania

Fayetteville, Tennessee

Fayetteville, Texas

Fayetteville, West Virginia

Fayetteville Historic District (Fayetteville, West Virginia)

Fayetteville Historic District is a national historic district located at Fayetteville, Fayette County, West Virginia. The district encompasses 126 contributing buildings, 4 contributing sites, and 3 contributing structures. It includes the central business district and surrounding residential areas of Fayetteville. Notable buildings include Jack's Garage (1934), Theatre Building (1935), Fayette County Jail (1907), McClung House (1850), Old Methodist Church (c. 1905), Old Post Office (1920), Bank of Fayette-Town Hall (1921), U.S. Post Office (1938), and the War Memorial Building (1949). Also in the district is the site of Fort Toland, site of Fort Scammon and the Old Fayetteville Cemetery. The district includes the separately listed Fayette County Courthouse, E. B. Hawkins House, and Altamont Hotel.It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1990.

Homer A. Holt

Homer Adams Holt (March 1, 1898 – January 16, 1975) was a West Virginia lawyer and politician who served as that state's 20th governor from 1937 to 1941. Born in Lewisburg, West Virginia, he attended the Greenbrier Military School there and then went on to graduate from Washington and Lee University in 1918, where he was a member of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity. After serving in the army during World War I, he returned to Washington and Lee in 1920 and studied law, receiving his degree in 1923. In 1924, he married Isabel Wood.Holt taught law at Washington and Lee University School of Law for two years, and then practiced law in Fayetteville, West Virginia from 1925–1933. He was elected state attorney general in 1932, and served until becoming governor in 1937. Holt had been attorney general of West Virginia during the time of the Hawks Nest Tunnel tragedy and "During his term as attorney general, Holt successfully defended Union Carbide in the Supreme Court Trial, United States V. State of West Virginia, 295 U.S. 463 (1935)" Holt was governor during the time the Writers' Project of the Works Project Administration (WPA) began work on West Virginia: A Guide to the Mountain State in 1939. Holt did not want the guide to be published, he believed that it would discredit the state and was "propaganda from start to finish" After his term as governor he resumed his career as a lawyer by becoming general counsel for the Union Carbide Company in New York (same company behind the Hawks Nest Tunnel Tragedy).Holt was a trustee of Washington and Lee University from 1940 to 1969, when he became a trustee emeritus.

Holt's grandfather Homer A. Holt (1831–1898) was a lawyer and justice of the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals; he died shortly before Holt's birth and Holt was presumably named in his honor.

6. Justice Homer A. Holt (1831-1898) is survived by his Fourth Great Grandsons David J. Holt (Bartholomew) and John Homer Holt IV of Columbus, Ohio and Jakarta, Indonesia, respectively. (updated 11/1/2018)

6. Governor Homer A. Holt (1898-1975) is survived by his Great-Great nephews David J. Holt (Bartholomew) and John Homer Holt IV of Columbus, Ohio and Jakarta, Indonesia, respectively. (updated 11/1/2018)

James Kee

James Kee (April 15, 1917 – March 11, 1989) was a U.S. Democratic politician and a member of the United States House of Representatives from West Virginia

John R. Wright House

John R. Wright House is a historic Queen Anne-style house at 322 West Marlin Street in McPherson, Kansas, United States. The house was built in 1887 and added to the National Historic Register in 2002.

John R. Wright (1841-1926) was born in New Jersey, grew up in Cincinnati, Ohio, and served in the American Civil War, losing his left arm in the battle of Fayetteville, West Virginia. He later became a homesteader and businessman in Kansas, and eventually served as County Clerk and also as a Postmaster.The house was deemed notable "for its historical association with John R. Wright and for its architectural significance as a Queen Anne Revival residence."

Joseph H. Gaines

Joseph Holt 'Jodie' Gaines (September 3, 1864 – April 12, 1951) was a U.S. Representative from West Virginia.

Born in Washington, D.C., Gaines moved with his parents to Fayette County, West Virginia, in 1867.

He attended the West Virginia University at Morgantown and was graduated from Princeton College in 1886.

He was admitted to the bar in 1887 and commenced practice in Fayetteville, West Virginia.

He was appointed United States district attorney for West Virginia by President William McKinley in 1897.

He resigned in 1901.

Gaines was elected as a Republican to the Fifty-seventh and to the four succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1901 – March 3, 1911).

He served as chairman of the Committee on Election of President, Vice President, and Representatives (Fifty-eighth through Sixty-first Congresses).

He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1910.

He resumed the practice of law in Charleston, West Virginia.

He died in Montgomery, West Virginia, April 12, 1951.

He was interred in Spring Hill Cemetery, Charleston, West Virginia.

The town of Jodie, West Virginia was named in his honor.

Kay Moor, West Virginia

Kay Moor, also known as Kaymoor, is the site of an abandoned coal mine, coal processing plant and coal town near Fayetteville, West Virginia. The town site is located in the New River Gorge at Kaymoor Bottom (38°03′00″N 81°03′17″W). It is linked to the mine portal 560 feet (170 m) above on Sewell Bench (38°02′52″N 81°03′58″W) in the wall of the Gorge by conveyors. The mine exploited the New River Coalfield's Sewell Seam of "smokeless" low-volatile bituminous coal, while the town site was accessible only by the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad's mainline in the Gorge. The last portion of the Kay Moor complex, Kaymoor Top (38°02′48″N 81°04′09″W) was located at the Gorge rim and served as the terminus for the mountain haulage.

Lupu Bridge

The Lupu Bridge (simplified Chinese: 卢浦大桥; traditional Chinese: 盧浦大橋; pinyin: Lúpǔ Dàqiáo), named after Luwan District, is a through arch bridge over the Huangpu River in Shanghai, China, connecting the city's Huangpu and Pudong districts. It is the world's second longest steel arch bridge, after the Chaotianmen Bridge in Chongqing. The bridge has a total length including approach spans of 3,900 m (12,795 ft) and opened on June 28, 2003. The main bridge structure is 750m long including the two side spans of 100m each, and the main span of 550 metres (1,804 ft) over the Huangpu River is 32 metres (105 ft) longer than the previous record holder for the longest arch bridge, the New River Gorge Bridge in Fayetteville, West Virginia. It cost 2.5 billion yuan (US$302 million), including US$78.04 for the main steel structure alone. It is located adjacent to the former Expo 2010 site and served as the centrepiece of the world exposition in Shanghai.

Margaret Anne Staggers

Margaret Anne "Peggy" Staggers (born January 12, 1945) was a Democratic member of the West Virginia House of Delegates and served as an Assistant Majority Whip. Staggers is an emergency physician.

New River Gorge Bridge

The New River Gorge Bridge is a steel arch bridge 3,030 feet (924 m) long over the New River Gorge near Fayetteville, West Virginia, in the Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States. With an arch 1,700 feet (518 m) long, the New River Gorge Bridge was for many years the world's longest single-span arch bridge; it is now the fourth longest. Part of U.S. Route 19, its construction marked the completion of Corridor L of the Appalachian Development Highway System. The bridge is crossed by an average of 16,200 motor vehicles per day.The roadway of the New River Gorge Bridge is 876 feet (267 m) above the New River. The New River Gorge Bridge is one of the highest vehicular bridges in the world, and is currently the third highest in the United States. In 2005, the structure gained nationwide attention when the US Mint issued the West Virginia state quarter with the bridge depicted on one side. In 2013, the bridge was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Tunney Hunsaker

Tunney Morgan Hunsaker (September 1, 1930 – April 27, 2005) was an American professional boxer who also served as the police chief of Fayetteville, West Virginia. He was born in the western Kentucky town of Princeton, in Caldwell County.

WVBD

WVBD (100.7 FM, "West Virginia's Big Daddy") is a radio station broadcasting a classic country music format. Licensed to Fayetteville, West Virginia, United States, the station is currently owned by Summit Media South, Inc. and features programming from AP Radio and Dial Global.

William Laird IV

William Ramsey Laird IV (born June 3, 1952) is an American politician and a Democratic member of the West Virginia Senate representing District 10 since January 12, 2013. Laird served consecutively from January 2009 until January 2013 in the District 11 seat, and served non-consecutively in the West Virginia Legislature from January 1997 until January 2001 in the West Virginia House of Delegates in a District 29 seat. Laird is the son of former United States Senator William Laird III.

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