Fantasy fiction magazine

A fantasy fiction magazine or fantasy magazine is a magazine which publishes primarily fantasy fiction. Not generally included in the category are magazines for children with stories about such characters as Santa Claus. Also not included are adult magazines about sexual fantasy. Many fantasy magazines, in addition to fiction, have other features such as art, cartoons, reviews, or letters from readers. Some fantasy magazines also publish science fiction and horror fiction, so that here is not always a clear distinction between a fantasy magazine and a science fiction magazine. For example, Fantastic magazine published almost exclusively science fiction for much of its run.

FantasticAdventures
Fantastic Adventures magazine

Major fantasy magazines

Current magazines

Defunct magazines

See also

External links

  • Duotrope - search engine for fiction magazines

References

  1. ^ Hypnos
  2. ^ Mithila Review
  3. ^ https://duotrope.com/listing/20201
  4. ^ Absent Willow Review
  5. ^ Famous Fantastic Mysteries covers, contents
  6. ^ Fantastic Novels covers, contents
Aurealis

Aurealis is an Australian speculative fiction magazine published by Chimaera Publications, and is Australia's longest running small-press science-fiction and fantasy magazine. The magazine is based in Melbourne.

Beyond Fantasy Fiction

Beyond Fantasy Fiction was a US fantasy fiction magazine edited by H. L. Gold, with only ten issues published from 1953 to 1955. The last two issues carried the cover title of Beyond Fiction, but the publication's name for copyright purposes remained as before.Although not a commercial success, it included several short stories by authors such as Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury and Philip K. Dick. The publication has been described by critics as a successor to the tradition of Unknown, a fantasy magazine that ceased publication in 1943. It was noted for printing fantasy with a rational basis such as werewolf stories that included scientific explanations. A selection of stories from Beyond was published in paperback form in 1963, also under the title Beyond.

James Gunn, a historian of science fiction, regarded the magazine as the best of the fantasy magazines launched in the early 1950s, and science fiction encyclopedist Donald H. Tuck contended it printed very good material. Not every critic viewed Beyond as completely successful, however; P. Schuyler Miller, in a 1963 review, commented that the stories were most successful when they did not try to emulate Unknown.

Fantastyka

Fantastyka (est 1982, in 1990 renamed Nowa Fantastyka) is a Polish speculative fiction monthly fantasy and science fiction magazine.

Fantasy Fiction (magazine)

Fantasy Fiction (previously Fantasy Magazine) was a fantasy and science fiction magazine published in the United States in 1953. It was published by Future Publications out of New York City. Between February 1953 and November 1953 they released a total of four issues in the digest format.

Fantasy Fiction published works by Robert E. Howard, the creator of Conan the Barbarian. It also published two of Philip K Dick's short stories, "Out in the Garden" and "The Cookie Lady".

Fenix (magazine)

Fenix was a Polish science fiction magazine published from 1990 to 2001. It was the first privately owned magazine in the country.

Horror fiction magazine

A horror fiction magazine is a magazine that publishes primarily horror fiction with the main purpose of frightening the reader. Horror magazines can be in print, on the internet, or both.

Jove Books

Jove Books, formerly known as Pyramid Books, is an American paperback and eBook publishing imprint, founded as an independent paperback house in 1949 by Almat Magazine Publishers (Alfred R. Plaine and Matthew Huttner). The company was sold to the Walter Reade Organization in the late 1960s. It was acquired in 1974 by Harcourt Brace (which became Harcourt Brace Jovanovich) which renamed it to Jove in 1977 and continued the line as an imprint. In 1979, they sold it to The Putnam Berkley Group, which is now part of the Penguin Group.

Phil Hirsch was vice president of Pyramid Books from 1955-1975 and had his name as author or editor on many of Pyramid's books, many of them anthologies of jokes, cartoons and humor, or concerned with the military and warfare, including some which combined those interests. While not the most prolific publisher of science fiction and fantasy during its years as Pyramid, it did offer some notable original titles in book form, such as Algis Budrys's novel Who? (1958), Theodore Sturgeon's novel Venus Plus X (1960) and several collections of Sturgeon's short fiction, as well as collections, novels and anthologies by Harlan Ellison and Judith Merril. Pyramid speculative fiction editor (1957–67) Donald R. Bensen edited two notable and popular anthologies drawn from the fantasy-fiction magazine Unknown, The Unknown (1963) and The Unknown 5 (1964), the latter including an introduction by and a previously unpublished story by Isaac Asimov, the story having been slated for publication by the magazine, which folded before it could appear. Pyramid in the 1960s also published several notable anthologies edited by L. Sprague de Camp, which helped create a sense of a tradition of sword & sorcery fantasy, and a series of four anthologies drawn from the magazine Weird Tales, attributed to magazine publisher and editor Leo Margulies, though the latter two apparently "ghost-edited" by Sam Moskowitz (Margulies and Moskowitz would in the 1970s launch a short-lived revival of the magazine). Among the notable paperback reprint editions Pyramid published in the 1950s and '60s were several collections by Robert Heinlein, Hal Clement's novel Mission of Gravity, and de Camp and Fletcher Pratt's The Incompleat Enchanter. Pyramid also published Evan Hunter's science fiction novel Tomorrow and Tomorrow (1956 as by Hunt Collins), and a paperback reprint of Shirley Jackson's novel The Road through the Wall (1956) in two editions with the variant title The Other Side of the Street (the first in 1958). Notable among the original publications in crime fiction were Death is My Dancing Partner (1959), a late novel by Cornell Woolrich, and such anthologies as The Young Punks (also 1959) attributed to Leo Margulies as editor.

In the 1960s Pyramid published two of the first three books attributed to Cordwainer Smith, one of the fiction-writing pseudonyms of Paul Linebarger, and began reprinting Fu Manchu novels by Sax Rohmer and pulp sf adventure novels by E. E. Smith, as well as several novelizations of Irwin Allen television shows and films, including one for Lost in Space and two others for The Time Tunnel, and Sturgeon's movie novelization for Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea. Other original book publications in the 1960s included the first of Harry Harrison's Stainless Steel Rat novels (1961), Avram Davidson's Masters of the Maze (1965) and Chester Anderson's cult novel The Butterfly Kid (1967). Asimov and the biologist John C. Lilly were among those who published popular-science books with Pyramid in the 1960s.

Among the notable projects at Pyramid in the 1970s was a series of reprints of the pulp magazine novels and novellas about the Shadow, published as by Maxwell Grant; Ellison in 1975 and '76 saw an eleven-volume set of his books reprinted or, in the cases of The Other Glass Teat and No Doors, No Windows (both 1975), published for the first time, in matching cover format featuring the art of Leo and Diane Dillon. Also, a brief "Harlan Ellison Discovery" series of books, as edited for Pyramid (and, for the last volume, Jove) by Ellison, featured Bruce Sterling's first novel Involution Ocean (1977) and Terry Carr's collection The Light at the End of the Universe (1976). But the most prominent and best-selling books Pyramid published in the 1970s were the series of historical novels written by John Jakes, the Kent Family Chronicles, beginning with The Bastard (1974), which were well-timed for popular interest in the U.S. Revolutionary War and the bicentennial celebration of independence. More modest or more critical than commercial successes published in the decade included Man on Fire: A Novel of Revolution by Bruce Douglas Reeves (1971) and several novels by Barry N. Malzberg.

A series of "crossover" books, bridging prose fiction and comics, was the eight-volume Weird Heroes series of anthologies and novels (1975–77), where new superheroes and pulp-magazine-style adventure heroes were featured, as edited for Pyramid by Byron Preiss, and featuring contributions from, among others, Ellison, Philip José Farmer, Jeff Jones, Archie Goodwin, Michael Moorcock, Beth Meacham, Jim Steranko, Ted White and novels as well as short fiction by Ron Goulart. Another Preiss project with Pyramid was in more-traditional, if early, graphic novel format, the Fiction Illustrated series.

The Jove branding was refocused not long after the purchase by the Putnam Berkeley Group, away from fantastic fiction generally and more toward crime fiction, further publication of John Jakes's and similar historical fiction, romance novels (including some with fantasy elements), and western series novels, such as the Longarm (book series) franchise; among the last notable fantasy-fiction titles as an HBJ/Jove Book was the 1979 variant edition of Robert Bloch's collection Pleasant Dreams, which varies in content from all previous editions (but like them, includes Bloch's fleshing out of an unfinished short story by Edgar Allan Poe, originally published as "The Light-House" in 1953).

Midnight Street

Midnight Street is a British horror fiction magazine founded and published by Trevor Denyer. It is a resurrection of a previous publication titled Roadworks, published under the current title since 2004.

On Spec

On Spec is a digest-sized, perfect-bound, Canadian quarterly magazine publishing stories and poetry in science fiction, fantasy, and allied genres broadly grouped under the "speculative fiction" umbrella.

Out in the Garden

"Out In The Garden" is a science fiction short story by American writer Philip K. Dick, first published in 1953 in the magazine Fantasy Fiction. It has since been republished several times, including in the collections Beyond Lies the Wub in 1988.

Outline of fantasy

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to fantasy:

Fantasy – genre of fiction that commonly uses magic and other supernatural phenomena as a primary plot element, theme, or setting. Many works within the genre take place in imaginary worlds where magic is common. Fantasy is generally distinguished from the genre of science fiction by the expectation that it steers clear of scientific themes, though there is a great deal of overlap between the two.

Strange Horizons

Strange Horizons is an online speculative fiction magazine. It also features speculative poetry in every issue.

Tales of the Unanticipated

Tales of the Unanticipated, known as TOTU, is a semiprozine that was founded under the auspices of the Minnesota Science Fiction Society (known as Mn-STF or Minn-STF), and has since become independent. Like contemporaries such as Crank! and Century, Tales of the Unanticipated strove from its inception to showcase fiction, poetry and articles that are ostensibly speculative fiction.

The Black Stranger

"The Black Stranger" is one of the stories by American writer Robert E. Howard about Conan the Cimmerian. It was written in the 1930s, but not published in his lifetime. When the original Conan version of his story failed to find a publisher, Howard rewrote "The Black Stranger" into a piratical Terence Vulmea story entitled "Swords of the Red Brotherhood".

The original version of the story was later rewritten by L. Sprague de Camp into a different Conan story and published in Fantasy Magazine in February 1953. It was retitled "The Treasure of Tranicos" for book publication later the same year. Its first hardbound publication was in King Conan by Gnome Press, and its first paperback publication was in Conan the Usurper published by Lancer Books in 1967. It was republished together with an introduction and two non-fiction pieces on the story and on Howard by de Camp with illustrations by Esteban Maroto as The Treasure of Tranicos by Ace Books in 1980.

Howard's original version of the story was first published in 1987 in Echoes of Valor and more recently in the collections The Conan Chronicles Volume 2: The Hour of the Dragon (Gollancz, 2001) and Conan of Cimmeria: Volume Three (1935-1936) (Del Rey Books, 2005).

The Cookie Lady (short story)

"The Cookie Lady" is a horror short story by American writer Philip K. Dick. It was originally published in the June 1953 issue of the magazine Fantasy Fiction.

The Stronger Spell

"The Stronger Spell" is a fantasy short story by American writer L. Sprague de Camp, part of his Pusadian series. It was first published in the magazine Fantasy Fiction for November 1953, and first appeared in book form in de Camp's collection The Tritonian Ring and Other Pusadian Tales (Twayne, 1953). It has since been reprinted in the anthology The Mighty Barbarians, edited by Hans Stefan Santesson (Lancer Books, 1969). It was included in the omnibus de Camp collection Lest Darkness Fall/Rogue Queen/The Tritonian Ring and Other Pusadian Tales published in trade paperback by Gollancz in February 2014 and as an ebook by Gateway/Orion in March of the same year. It has also been translated into Dutch and German.

Twilight Zone literature

Twilight Zone literature is an umbrella term for the many books and comic books which concern or adapt The Twilight Zone television series.

Unknown (magazine)

Unknown (also known as Unknown Worlds) was an American pulp fantasy fiction magazine, published from 1939 to 1943 by Street & Smith, and edited by John W. Campbell. Unknown was a companion to Street & Smith's science fiction pulp, Astounding Science Fiction, which was also edited by Campbell at the time; many authors and illustrators contributed to both magazines. The leading fantasy magazine in the 1930s was Weird Tales, which focused on shock and horror. Campbell wanted to publish a fantasy magazine with more finesse and humor than Weird Tales, and put his plans into action when Eric Frank Russell sent him the manuscript of his novel Sinister Barrier, about aliens who own the human race. Unknown's first issue appeared in March 1939; in addition to Sinister Barrier, it included H. L. Gold's "Trouble With Water", a humorous fantasy about a New Yorker who meets a water gnome. Gold's story was the first of many in Unknown to combine commonplace reality with the fantastic.

Campbell required his authors to avoid simplistic horror fiction and insisted that the fantasy elements in a story be developed logically: for example, Jack Williamson's "Darker Than You Think" describes a world in which there is a scientific explanation for the existence of werewolves. Similarly, L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt's Harold Shea series, about a modern American who finds himself in the worlds of various mythologies, depicts a system of magic based on mathematical logic. Other notable stories included several well-received novels by L. Ron Hubbard and short stories such as Manly Wade Wellman's "When It Was Moonlight" and Fritz Leiber's "Two Sought Adventure", the first in his Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser series.

Unknown was forced to a bimonthly schedule in 1941 by poor sales, and cancelled in 1943 when wartime paper shortages became so acute that Campbell had to choose between turning Astounding into a bimonthly or ending Unknown. The magazine is generally regarded as the finest fantasy fiction magazine ever published, despite the fact that it was not commercially successful, and in the opinion of science fiction historian Mike Ashley it was responsible for the creation of the modern fantasy publishing genre.

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