Fantastic Stories

Fantastic Stories is a collection of six short stories written by Soviet author Andrei Sinyavsky under the pseudonym Abram Tertz between 1955 and 1961, first published by Pantheon Books in 1963. The stories are titled "At the Circus", "The Graphomaniacs", "The Tenants", "You and I", "The Icicle", and "Phkents". All of the fantastic tales are written in the style of "fantastic realism", which combines phantasmagorical art with socialist realism. [1]

FantasticStories
First edition (publ. Pantheon Books)
Cover art by Lois Ehlert

References

  1. ^ Dalton, Margaret. Andrei Siniavskii and Julii Daniel: Two Soviet "Heretical" Writers.
DNA Publications

DNA Publications was an American publishing company which existed from 1993 to 2007 and was run by the husband-and wife team of Warren Lapine and Angela Kessler, who met at a science fiction convention in Virginia. Initially based in Massachusetts, DNA Publications relocated to Radford, Virginia. As of 2004 it was the second-largest genre magazine publisher in the US. Its first publication, in 1993, was the magazine Harsh Mistress, which Lapine produced in collaboration with Kevin Rogers and Tim Ballon.

DNA Publication distributed or published Aboriginal SF, Absolute Magnitude, Artemis, Dreams of Decadence, Fantastic Stories, Mythic Delirium, The Official KISS Magazine, Science Fiction Chronicle, and The Whole Cat Journal. It also published the book imprints Spyre Books and Wilder Publications. For their work on the magazines, DNA Publications was a 2000 World Fantasy Award nominee, in the "special award: professional" category. Absolute Magnitude was a 2002 Hugo Award nominee in the semiprozine category. Notable authors published by the DNA Publications magazines include Chris Bunch, Hal Clement, Harlan Ellison, Alan Dean Foster, and Allen Steele.

DNA Publications collapsed in early 2007. Weird Tales had been bought in 2005 by Wildside Press and Mythic Delirium, which parted with DNA Publications around the same time. Wilder Publications is now part of Tir Na Nog Press.

Fantastic (magazine)

Fantastic was an American digest-size fantasy and science fiction magazine, published from 1952 to 1980. It was founded by the publishing company Ziff Davis as a fantasy companion to Amazing Stories. Early sales were good, and the company quickly decided to switch Amazing from pulp format to digest, and to cease publication of their other science fiction pulp, Fantastic Adventures. Within a few years sales fell, and Howard Browne, the editor, was forced to switch the focus to science fiction rather than fantasy. Browne lost interest in the magazine as a result and the magazine generally ran poor-quality fiction in the mid-1950s, under Browne and his successor, Paul W. Fairman.

At the end of the 1950s, Cele Goldsmith took over as editor of both Fantastic and Amazing Stories, and quickly invigorated the magazines, bringing in many new writers and making them, in the words of one science fiction historian, the "best-looking and brightest" magazines in the field. Goldsmith helped to nurture the early careers of writers such as Roger Zelazny and Ursula K. Le Guin, but was unable to increase circulation, and in 1965 the magazines were sold to Sol Cohen, who hired Joseph Wrzos as editor and switched to a reprint-only policy. This was financially successful, but brought Cohen into conflict with the newly formed Science Fiction Writers of America. After a turbulent period at the end of the 1960s, Ted White became editor and the reprints were phased out.

White worked hard to make the magazine successful, introducing artwork from artists who had made their names in comics, and working with new authors such as Gordon Eklund. His budget for fiction was low, but he was occasionally able to find good stories from well-known writers that had been rejected by other markets. Circulation continued to decline, however, and in 1978, Cohen sold out his half of the business to his partner, Arthur Bernhard. White resigned shortly afterwards, and was replaced by Elinor Mavor, but within two years Bernhard decided to close down Fantastic, merging it with Amazing Stories, which had always enjoyed a slightly higher circulation.

Guigues III of Albon

Guigues the Old, count of Albon, called Guigues III (between 1050 and 1060–1133) was a Count of Albon from 1079, when the County of Vienne, then in the possession of the Archdiocese of Vienne, was divided between him and Humbert I of Savoy, who received Maurienne.

He was the son of Guigues II d'Albon and Petronel of Turin. His ancestors were lords of the castle of Albon and counts (comites) in the Grésivaudan and Briançonnais.

Guigues's reign was marked by continual strife with Hugh of Châteauneuf, Bishop of Grenoble, over the suzerainty of certain church lands in the Grésivaudan. Hugh accused the count of usurping the lands with the help of the Bishop Mallem and invented fantastic stories to back up his claim to the disputed estates. Finally an accord was signed between Guigues and the bishop in 1099. Guigues returned the ecclesiastic land, while Hugh recognised the authority of the count in the vicinity of Grenoble.

In 1095, Guigues contracted an exemplary marriage with the high-born Matilda, long thought to be the daughter of Edgar the Aetheling, but now thought more likely to have been a daughter of Roger I of Sicily, the Great Count, and his third wife, Adelaide del Vasto. Patrick Deret, however, alleges, on the basis of possible birth dates, that her mother must have been Roger's second wife, Eremburga of Mortain.

In 1129, Guigues benefited further from the division of the Viennois between himself and Amadeus III of Savoy. Four years later, he died, leaving as his heir Guigues IV "dauphin" (died 28 June 1142) and a second son, Humbert, Archbishop of Vienne (died 26 June 1147). He had third son Guigues "the elder" who was living in 1105 and died young. He had three daughters:

Garsenda, married William III of Forcalquier

Matilda, married Amadeus III of Savoy

Beatrice (born c. 1100), married Josserand de Die (c. 1095 – c. 1147)

Heroes and Horrors

Heroes and Horrors is a collection of fantasy and horror short stories by Fritz Leiber, edited by Stuart David Schiff and illustrated by Tim Kirk. It was first published in hardcover in December 1978 by Whispers Press, and in paperback in August 1980 by Pocket Books. The paperback edition omits the illustrations.

The book collects nine short stories and novelettes by the author, together with an introduction by Stuart David Schiff and an essay by John Jakes. The first two stories (the second original to the collection) showcase Leiber's Sword and Sorcery heroes Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser. The other pieces originally were published in the magazines The Dragon Magazine for December 1977 and Fantastic Stories of Imagination for February 1962 and October 1964, the collection The Second Book of Fritz Leiber (1975), the magazines Fantastic for February 1969 and Worlds of If for August 1974, and the anthologies The Disciples of Cthulhu (1976) and Superhorror (1976).

James Blish

James Benjamin Blish (23 May 1921 – 30 July 1975) was an American science fiction and fantasy writer. He is best known for his Cities in Flight novels, and his series of Star Trek novelizations written with his wife, J. A. Lawrence. He is credited with creating the term gas giant to refer to large planetary bodies.

Blish was a member of the Futurians. His first published stories appeared in Super Science Stories and Amazing Stories.

Blish wrote literary criticism of science fiction using the pen-name William Atheling Jr. His other pen names included: Donald Laverty, John MacDougal, and Arthur Lloyd Merlyn.

King Solomon's Ring (short story)

King Solomon's Ring is a novelette by Roger Zelazny which appeared in the fantasy and science fiction magazine Fantastic: Stories of Imagination in 1963. A French translation, "L'anneau du roi Salomon", was published in 1985.

The novelette was republished five years later in Great Science Fiction, a reprint companion to Fantastic. Terry Carr included it in his Ace anthology On Our Way to the Future in 1970. After TSR purchased Amazing and Fantastic, it was reprinted in their anthology Fantastic Stories: Tales of the Weird & Wondrous in 1987. Ellen Datlow chose the story for the March 3, 2004 issue of the online Sci Fiction."King Solomon's Ring" was not included in any of Zelazny's story collections during his lifetime, but was published in Threshold, the first volume of The Collected Stories of Roger Zelazny, published by NESFA Press in 2009.

While some readers have dismissed the story as lesser work, Samuel R. Delany included it in his listing of Zelazny's characteristic works, an "oeuvre [which] tends to mesh into one gorgeous fabric".

Memories of the Space Age

Memories of the Space Age is a collection of science fiction stories by British writer J.G. Ballard. It was released in 1988 by Arkham House. It was published in an edition of 4,903 copies and was the author's first book published by Arkham House. The stories, set at Cape Canaveral, originally appeared in the magazines Ambit, Fantastic Stories, Fantasy and Science Fiction, Interzone, New Worlds and Playboy.

Portals of Tomorrow

Portals of Tomorrow is an anthology of science fiction stories edited by American writer August Derleth, intended as the first in a series of "year's best" volumes. It was first published by Rinehart & Company in 1954. The stories had originally appeared in the magazines Fantasy and Science Fiction, Future, Esquire, Fantastic Universe, Galaxy Science Fiction, Blue Book, Startling Stories, Orbit, Astounding Stories and Beyond Fantasy Fiction.

Swords Against Death

Swords Against Death is a fantasy short story collection by American writer Fritz Leiber, first published in 1970 and featuring his sword and sorcery heroes Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser. It is chronologically the second volume of the complete seven volume edition of the collected stories devoted to the characters. It is an expansion of Leiber's earlier collection Two Sought Adventure, issued by Gnome Press during 1957. The earlier collection contained seven of the ten stories of Swords Against Death, plus an "Induction" omitted from the expanded edition, which was instead republished in its companion volume, Swords and Deviltry (1970). Swords Against Death was first published in paperback during 1970 by Ace Books, which reprinted the title numerous times through August 1990; later paperback editions were issued by ibooks (2003) and Dark Horse (2007). It has been published in the United Kingdom by New English Library (1972), Mayflower Books (1979) and Grafton (1986). The first hardcover edition was issued by Gregg Press during December 1977. The book has also been gathered together with others of the series into various omnibus editions; The Three of Swords (1989), Ill Met in Lankhmar (1995), The First Book of Lankhmar (2001), and Lankhmar (2008).

The book collects ten short stories, eight of which were originally published in the magazines Unknown for August 1939, Unknown Worlds for February 1942 and February 1943, Unknown Fantasy Fiction for November 1940, and June 1941, Other Worlds Science Stories for May 1953, Suspense for Fall 1951, and Fantastic Stories of Imagination for August 1963, and two of which first appeared in the book itself.

Swords Against Wizardry

Swords Against Wizardry is a fantasy short story collection, first published 1968, by Fritz Leiber and Harry Fischer, featuring their sword and sorcery heroes Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser. Fischer's contribution was limited to ten thousand words of The Lords of Quarmall. The book is chronologically the fourth volume of the complete seven volume edition of the collected stories devoted to the characters. It was first published in paperback format during 1968 by Ace Books company, which reprinted the title numerous times up to October 1990; later paperback editions were issued by ibooks (2003) and Dark Horse (2007). It has been published in the United Kingdom by Grafton (1986). The first hardcover edition was issued by Gregg Press during December 1977.

The book has been collected, along with others in the series, in various omnibus editions: Swords' Masters (1990), Lean Times in Lankhmar (1996), The First Book of Lankhmar (2001), and Lankhmar (2008).

The book collects four short stories, three of which were originally published in the magazines Fantastic for November 1965 and August 1968 and Fantastic Stories of Imagination for January and February 1964, and one of which first appeared in the book itself.

Swords and Deviltry

Swords and Deviltry is a fantasy short story collection, first published 1970, by Fritz Leiber, featuring his sword and sorcery heroes Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser. It is chronologically the first volume of the complete seven volume edition of the collected stories devoted to the characters. The book was first published in paperback form during 1970 by Ace Books company, which reprinted the title numerous times through November 1985; later paperback editions were issued by ibooks (2003) and Dark Horse (2006). It has been published in the United Kingdom by New English Library (1971), Mayflower Books (1979) and Grafton (1986, 1988). The first hardcover edition was issued by Gregg Press during December 1977. The book has also been gathered together with others in the series into various omnibus editions; The Three of Swords (1989), Ill Met in Lankhmar (1995), The First Book of Lankhmar (2001), and Lankhmar (2008).

The book collects three short stories originally published in the magazines Fantastic for April 1970, Fantastic Stories of Imagination for October 1962, and The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction for April 1970, together with an "Induction" that originally appeared in the 1957 Fafhrd and Gray Mouser collection Two Sought Adventure (later expanded, minus the induction, as Swords Against Death (1970).

Swords in the Mist

Swords in the Mist is a fantasy short story collection, first published 1968, by Fritz Leiber, featuring his sword and sorcery heroes Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser. It is chronologically the third volume of the complete seven volume edition of the collected stories devoted to the characters. It was first published in paperback format during 1968 by Ace Books company, which reprinted the title numerous times through September 1990; later paperback editions were issued by ibooks (2003) and Dark Horse (2007). It has been published in the United Kingdom by Mayflower Books (1979) and Grafton (1986, 1987). The first hardcover edition was issued by Gregg Press during December 1977. The book has also been gathered together with others in the series into various omnibus editions; The Three of Swords (1989), Lean Times in Lankhmar (1996), The First Book of Lankhmar (2001), and Lankhmar (2008).

The book collects six short stories, of which three were originally published in the magazines Fantastic Stories of Imagination for May 1963 and Fantastic Science Fiction Stories for November 1959 and May 1960, one was published originally in the collection Night's Black Agents (1947), and two first appeared in the book itself.

The Blue World

The Blue World is a science fiction adventure novel by American writer Jack Vance. The novel is based on Vance’s earlier novella "The Kragen", which appeared in the July 1964 edition of Fantastic Stories of Imagination.

The Emperor of the Ancient Word and Other Fantastic Stories

The Emperor of the Ancient Word and Other Fantastic Stories is a collection of fantasy short stories by American writer Darrell Schweitzer. It was first published as a trade paperback by Wildside Press in May 2013, with an ebook edition following in October of the same year.

The Fortunes of Brak

The Fortunes of Brak is a collection of fantasy short stories by John Jakes featuring his sword and sorcery hero Brak the Barbarian. It includes all Brak stories not previously gathered into the earlier books in the series.

The Swords of Lankhmar

The Swords of Lankhmar is a fantasy novel, first published 1968, by Fritz Leiber, featuring his sword and sorcery heroes Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser. It is chronologically the fifth volume of the complete seven volume edition of the collected stories devoted to the characters. The book is an expansion of Leiber's earlier novella "Scylla's Daughter", which was published originally in the magazine Fantastic Stories of Imagination for May 1961. The full novel first published in paperback format during 1968 by Ace Books company, which reprinted the title numerous times through 1986; a later paperback edition was issued by Dark Horse (2008). It has been published in the United Kingdom by Mayflower Books (1970) and Grafton (1986, 1987). The first hardcover edition was issued by Rupert Hart-Davis during June 1969; a later hardcover edition was issued by Gregg Press during December 1977. The book has also been gathered together with others in the series into various omnibus editions; Swords' Masters (1990), Return to Lankhmar (1997), and The Second Book of Lankhmar (2001).

Vera Zhelikhovskaya

Vera Zhelikhovsky, Russian: Ве́ра Петро́вна Желихо́вская (April 29, 1835 - May 17, 1896), sometimes transliterated as Vera Jelihovsky, was a Russian writer, mostly of children's stories. She was Madame Blavatsky's sister.

Vera Zhelikhovsky wrote also fantastic stories with heroes having secret knowledge like Cornelius Agrippa, shamans, and Oriental magicians.

Young Thongor

Young Thongor is a collection of fantasy short stories by American writer Lin Carter, with additional material by Robert M. Price, edited and with a foreword by Adrian Cole. It was first published in trade paperback by Wildside Press in May, 2012. Most of the pieces were first published in magazines, anthologies or other books by Carter; the remaining pieces are original to the present work.

Zona X

Zona X is an Italian comic book originally published in Italy by Sergio Bonelli Editore between 1992 and 1999. The writer of the series is Alfredo Castelli. Zona X consists of a series of unusual/bizarre/fantastic stories. Normally one Zona X issue is about 196 pages, which includes two complete stories.

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