Fanniidae

The Fanniidae are a small (285 species in five genera) group of true flies largely confined to the Holarctic and temperate Neotropical ecozones; there are 11 Afrotropical species, 29 Oriental, and 14 Australasian.

Adults are medium-sized to small and usually have mainly dark body and leg colours. Males congregate in characteristic dancing swarms beneath trees; females are more retiring in habit. Larvae are characterised by their flattened bodies with striking lateral protuberances, and live as scavengers in various kinds of decaying organic matter.

The lesser housefly Fannia canicularis is a worldwide synanthropic species.

Fanniidae are indicators useful in forensic entomology.

Fanniidae
Fannia canicularis
Fannia canicularis
Scientific classification
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Fanniidae

Genera

Identifying characteristics

The Fanniidae were once a subfamily of Muscidae from which they may be distinguished by:

  • A (strictly) dorsal bristle is on the hind tibia below the middle and in addition to the dorsal preapical.
  • The axillary vein is strongly curved towards the wingtip, so if extended, the axillary and anal veins would meet before reaching the wing tip.
  • In males, the middle tibia has an erect pubescence beneath; in females, the frontalia is without crossed bristles, the frontal orbits are broad, and convex towards median line of frons, and two pairs of strong upper orbital bristles are present, with the anterior pair turned outwards.[a]

Notes

  1. ^ For a pictorial atlas explaining these terms go to CSIRO: Fly and for images to Diptera.info.

References

  1. ^ Townsend, C.H.T. (1935). Manual of myiology in twelve parts. Pt 2: Muscoid classification and habits. 2. Itaquaquecetuba, Sao Paulo. pp. 1–296.
  2. ^ Pont, A.C. (1977). A revision of Australian Fanniidae (Diptera : Calyptrata). Australian Journal of Zoology Supplementary Series. pp. 1–60 pp.
  3. ^ Domínguez, M. Cecilia; Pont, Adrian C. (2014). "Fanniidae (Insecta: Diptera)". Fauna of New Zealand. 71: 1–92. Retrieved 29 November 2018.

Identification

References to identify the family include:

  • Chillcott, J.G. 1961. "A revision of the Nearctic species of Fanniinae (Diptera: Muscidae)". Can. Entomol. Suppl. 14, 295 p. Keys to Nearctic genera and species. Excellent figures.
  • Willi Hennig Muscidae in Erwin Lindner: Die Fliegen der Paläarktischen Region,7 (63b) 1-1110. Out of date, but good keys and figures.
  • Lyneborg, L. 1970. "Taxonomy of European Fannia larvae (Diptera, Fanniidae)". Stuttg. Beitr. Naturkd. 215, 28 p.
  • Rozkosny, R.; Gregor, F.; Pont, A.C. 1997. "The European Fanniidae (Diptera)". Acta Sci. Nat. Brno. 80p. Keys to all 82 known European species (males, females and larvae).

External links

Species lists

Australofannia

Australofannia is a genus of flies of the family Fanniidae. There is only one known species, Australofannia spiniclunis Pont, 1977, from southeastern Australia. The genus was first described by the English entomologist Adrian C. Pont in 1977.

Australofannia spiniclunis

Australofannia spiniclunis is a fly species in the Fanniidae family. It is the only known species of the genus Australofannia from Southeastern Australia. The species was first described by the English entomologist Adrian C. Pont in 1977.

Calyptratae

Calyptratae is a subsection of Schizophora in the insect order Diptera, commonly referred to as the calyptrate muscoids (or simply calyptrates). It consists of those flies which possess a calypter that covers the halteres, among which are some of the most familiar of all flies, such as the house fly.

About 18,000 described species are in this group, or about 12% of all the flies yet described.

Euryomma (fly)

Euryomma is a genus of species of flies of the family Fanniidae. The genus was originally proposed by the entomologist Paul Stein in 1899. Although at that time most authorities placed them in the family Muscidae. The distribution of Euryomma is mainly Neotropical, on the whole restricted to the Americas, there is also one Nearctic species, the exception being of the very cosmopolitan E. peregrinum (Meigen, 1826)

Euryomma muisca

Euryomma muisca is a species of fly in the genus Euryomma. It was first described by Grisales et al. in 2012.

Fannia (genus)

Fannia is a very large genus of approximately 288 species of flies. The genus was originally described by the French entomologist Jean-Baptiste Robineau-Desvoidy in 1830. A number of species were formerly placed in the genus Musca.

Fannia armata

Fannia armata is a fly species in the Fanniidae family. This species is smaller and more slender than the house fly, Musca domestica, and is similar in appearance to the lesser house fly, Fannia canicularis. It is found in the Palearctic. For identification see

Fannia carbonaria

Fannia carbonaria is a fly species in the Fanniidae family. This species is smaller and more slender than the house fly, Musca domestica, and is similar in appearance to the lesser house fly, Fannia canicularis.

Fannia lepida

Fannia lepida is a fly species in the Fanniidae family. This species is smaller and more slender than the house fly, Musca domestica, and is similar in appearance to the lesser house fly, Fannia canicularis. It is found in the Palearctic. For identification see

Fannia lustrator

Fannia lustrator is a fly species in the Fanniidae family. This species is smaller and more slender than the house fly, Musca domestica, and is similar in appearance to the lesser house fly, Fannia canicularis. It is found in the Palearctic. For identification see

Fannia mollissima

Fannia mollissima is a species of fly in the family Fanniidae. It is found in the Palearctic . For identification see

Fannia ornata

Fannia ornata is a species of fly in the family Fanniidae. This species is smaller and more slender than the house fly, Musca domestica, and is similar in appearance to the lesser house fly, Fannia canicularis.

Fannia pusio

Fannia pusio, known as the chicken dung fly is a fly species of the family Fanniidae including over 260 species of flies worldwide. Originally native to Central and North America, its distribution is now largely global, having been introduced with livestock. As its common name implies it can be very abundant at poultry facilities, resulting in considerable nuisance by their huge numbers. But the larvae will also feed on a wide variety of food, including rotting vegetable matter, excrement, fungi and carrion.

Fannia scalaris

Fannia scalaris, also known as the latrine fly, is a fly species in the Fanniidae family. This species is smaller and more slender than the house fly, Musca domestica, and is similar in appearance to the lesser house fly, Fannia canicularis. The life cycle of this species can be as long as one month. These flies are globally distributed in urban areas as they are drawn to unsanitary environments. F. scalaris is a major cause of myiasis, the infestation of a body cavity by fly maggots. The adults infest bodies that have decomposed, making the species an important part of forensic entomology. The larvae of this fly have adapted protuberances, or feathered appendages, that allow them to survive in such a moist environment. Entomologists continue to research the effects that F. scalaris may have medically, forensically, and on the environment around them.

Fannia serena

Fannia serena is a species of fly in the family Fanniidae. It is found in the Palearctic . For identification see

Fannia sociella

Fannia sociella is a fly species in the Fanniidae family. This species is smaller and more slender than the house fly, Musca domestica, and is similar in appearance to the lesser house fly, Fannia canicularis. It is found in the Palearctic. For identification see

Lesser house fly

The lesser house fly or little house fly, Fannia canicularis, is somewhat smaller (3.5–6 mm (0.14–0.24 in)) than the common housefly. It is best known for its habit of entering buildings and flying in jagged patterns in the middle of a room. It is slender, and the median vein in the wing is straight. Larvae feed on all manner of decaying organic matter, including carrion. Among the Fanniidae, this species is the one most frequently associated with myiasis.

Muscidae

Muscidae are a family of flies found in the superfamily Muscoidea.

Muscidae, some of which are commonly known as house flies or stable flies due to their synanthropy, are worldwide in distribution and contain almost 4,000 described species in over 100 genera.

Most species are not synanthropic. Adults can be predatory, hematophagous, saprophagous, or feed on a number of types of plant and animal exudates. They can be attracted to various substances including sugar, sweat, tears [1] and blood. Larvae occur in various habitats including decaying vegetation, dry and wet soil, nests of insects and birds, fresh water, and carrion.

The housefly, Musca domestica, is the best known and most important species.

Some, from the genera Hydrotaea and Muscina, are involved in forensic case studies.

Muscoidea

Muscoidea is a superfamily of flies in the subsection Calyptratae. Muscoidea, with approximately 7000 described species, is nearly 5% of the known species level diversity of the Diptera, the true flies. Most muscoid flies are saprophagous, coprophagous or necrophagous as larvae, but some species are parasitic, predatory, or phytophagous.

Extant Diptera families

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