Faimalaga Luka

Faimalaga Luka (April 15, 1940 – August 19, 2005) was a political figure from the Pacific nation of Tuvalu. He represented the constituency of Nukufetau in the Parliament of Tuvalu. He served as Governor-General and the Prime Minister of Tuvalu.


Faimalaga Luka

Governor-General of Tuvalu
In office
9 September 2003 – 15 April 2005
MonarchElizabeth II
Prime MinisterSaufatu Sopoanga
Maatia Toafa
Preceded byTomasi Puapua
Succeeded byFiloimea Telito
Prime Minister of Tuvalu
In office
24 February 2001 – 13 December 2001
MonarchElizabeth II
Governor-GeneralTomasi Puapua
Preceded byLagitupu Tuilimu (acting)
Succeeded byKoloa Talake
Personal details
BornApril 15, 1940
DiedAugust 19, 2005 (aged 65)
Suva, Fiji

Background

He was a broadcaster and politician, spending 40 years in the civil service and in politics, serving in roles including Minister for Health from 1994 to 1996 and Minister of Home Affairs from 1999 to 2001. He was married to Sikiona Luka.[1]

Prime Minister

After the death of Prime Minister Ionatana on 8 December 2000, Lagitupu Tuilimu was acting prime minister from 8 December 2000 to 24 February 2001. Faimalaga Luka became the Prime Minister of Tuvalu on 23 February 2001 and was sworn in the next day with a reshuffled cabinet.[2] Luka's government lasted until December 2001, when he lost office as the consequence of a motion of no confidence.[2] On 13 December 2001 the former finance minister Koloa Talake was appointed prime minister.[2][3]

Speaker of Parliament

In June 2003 he became speaker of parliament, although an opposition MP at the time.[4]

Governor-General

Luka was appointed as Governor-General on 9 September 2003,[2] as the representative of HM Queen Elizabeth II, who is Tuvalu's head of state. He retired on 15 April 2005,[2][5] after reaching his 65th birthday. Tuvalu, unlike most countries, has a mandatory retirement age for all civil servants.

Declines a Knighthood

Historical note: Luka was the only Governor-General of Tuvalu not to accept a Knighthood. The practice of a Governor-General accepting a Knighthood was resumed by Luka's successor to that office, Sir Filoimea Telito.

Death

He died on August 19, 2005 in Fiji where he had been referred for medical treatment.[2][6]

See also

Preceded by
Lagitupu Tuilimu (acting)
Prime Minister of Tuvalu
2001
Succeeded by
Koloa Talake
Preceded by
Sir Tomasi Puapua
Governor-General of Tuvalu
2003–2005
Succeeded by
Sir Filoimea Telito

References

  1. ^ "H.E. Faimalaga Luka, Prime Minister of Tuvalu, and Mrs. Sikiona Luka, at the invitation of the government". Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Republic of China (Taiwan). 18 June 2001. Retrieved 19 April 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Lansford, Tom (2015). Political Handbook of the World 2015. CQ Press.
  3. ^ Page, Kogan (2004). Asia and Pacific Review 2003/04. Kogan Page Publishers. p. 261.
  4. ^ "Tuvalu has new speaker". Radio New Zealand International. 24 June 2003. Retrieved 30 September 2011.
  5. ^ Craig, Robert D. (2010). Historical Dictionary of Polynesia. Scarecrow Press.
  6. ^ PACIFIC ISLANDS REPORT - Polynesia in Review: Issues and Events, 1 July 2005 to 30 June 2006 Archived March 3, 2016, at the Wayback Machine
1998 Tuvaluan general election

General elections were held in Tuvalu on 26 March 1998. As there were no political parties, all candidates for the 12 seats ran as independents, with seven of the incumbents retaining their seats. Following the election, Bikenibeu Paeniu was re-elected Prime Minister.

2002 Tuvaluan general election

General elections were held in Tuvalu on 25 July 2002. All candidates were independents, as there are no political parties in the country. Saufatu Sopoanga was appointed Prime Minister after the election as the previous Prime Minister Koloa Talake lost his seat.

2003 Nanumea by-election

A by-election was held in the Nanumea constituency in Tuvalu on 5 May 2003. It was triggered by the annulment in February of incumbent MP Sio Patiale's election in the July 2002 general election. Patiale was found by the country's High Court of Tuvalu to have "lodged his nomination papers after the legal deadline", and thus not to have stood lawfully as a candidate in the general election.On the same day the Niutao by-election, 2003 was also held, following the death of the Speaker of Parliament, Saloa Tauia in February. There are no political parties in Tuvalu, but Patiale and Tauia were both members of prime minister Saufatu Sopoanga's extremely narrow parliamentary majority. In the 2002 general election, Sopoanga had obtained the support of just 8 MPs (himself included) out of 15. His government thus needed to win both by-elections in order to retain its majority.Nanumea is a two-seat constituency, and in the 2002 general election it had returned Sio Patiale and Maatia Toafa with 24.8% and 23% of the vote respectively, ahead of five other candidates. For the by-election, of course, only one seat would be provided for, Toafa retaining the other. There were three candidates: Patale, Lagitupu Tuilimu who had held the seat from 1998 2002, and newcomer Lopati Tefoa.Patiale won comprehensively, obtaining an absolute majority of the vote. This was not immediately enough to save the Sopoanga government, however: Taavau Teii, the winner of the Niutao by-election, was initially uncommitted, then sided with the opposition, providing it with a parliamentary majority. The opposition asked that parliament be recalled, so that a motion of no confidence in the government could be tabled. Sopoanga delayed recalling parliament until September, then appointed opposition MP Faimalaga Luka as governor-general, depriving the opposition of its crucial one-seat majority and triggering the Nukufetau by-election, 2003. The winner of the October by-election, Elisala Pita, joined the government's benches, enabling it to survive a while longer. The Sopoanga government was eventually brought down by an eight-to-six motion of no confidence in August 2004, and Patiale announced his own resignation due to ill-health in April 2005, precipitating yet another by-election in his constituency.

2003 Niutao by-election

A by-election was held in the Niutao constituency in Tuvalu on 5 May 2003. It was triggered by the death of the incumbent MP, Saloa Tauia. Tauia, the Speaker of Parliament, died in February, after having entered Parliament in the July 2002 general election.On the same day, the Nanumea by-election, 2003 was also held, which following the annulment in February of incumbent MP Sio Patiale's election in the July 2002 general election. There are no political parties in Tuvalu, but Patiale and Tauia were both members of prime minister Saufatu Sopoanga's extremely narrow parliamentary majority. In the 2002 general election, Sopoanga had obtained the support of just 8 MPs (himself included) out of 15. His government thus needed to win both by-elections in order to retain its majority.Niutao is a two-seat constituency, and in the 2002 general election it had returned Samuelu Teo and Saloa Tauia with 26.5% and 25.9% of the vote respectively, ahead of two other candidates. For the by-election, of course, only one seat would be provided for, Teo retaining the other.There was only one candidate to the by-election: Taavau Teii, who had come third in the constituency in the general election, with 24.56% of the vote. This time, he was thus elected unopposed. He had not indicated during his campaign whether he would side with the government or the opposition, and did not do so immediately after his election. Eventually, he joined the opposition, providing the latter with a one-seat majority in parliament; the Nanumea by-election had returned pro-government MP Sio Patiale to parliament. The opposition asked that parliament be recalled, so that a motion of no confidence in the government could be tabled. Sopoanga delayed recalling parliament until September, then appointed opposition MP Faimalaga Luka as governor general, depriving the opposition of its crucial one-seat majority and triggering the Nukufetau by-election, 2003. The winner of the October by-election, Elisala Pita, joined the government's benches, enabling it to survive a while longer. The Sopoanga government was eventually brought down by an eight-to-six motion of no confidence in August 2004.Teii would go on to be appointed deputy prime minister under Apisai Ielemia after the 2006 general election, and would hold that position until he lost his seat in parliament in the 2010 general election.

2003 Nukufetau by-election

A by-election was held in the Nukufetau constituency in Tuvalu as the consequence of the appointment of the opposition member of parliament Faimalaga Luka as the Governor-General of Tuvalu.

Bikenibeu Paeniu

Bikenibeu Paeniu, PC (born 10 May 1956 Bikenibeu, Tarawa, in the former Gilbert Islands) is a politician from Tuvalu. He represented the constituency of Nukulaelae in the Parliament of Tuvalu. He has served twice as the Prime Minister of Tuvalu.

Filoimea Telito

Sir Filoimea Telito (19 March 1945 – 11 July 2011) was a political and religious figure from the Pacific nation of Tuvalu. He was born on Vaitupu where he attended Elisefou (New Ellice) primary school. He later attended King George V Secondary School in Tarawa, Kiribati.

Governor-General of Tuvalu

The Governor-General of Tuvalu is the representative of the Tuvaluan monarch (currently Queen Elizabeth II) and performs the duties of the Queen in her absence.

Ionatana Ionatana

Ionatana Ionatana, CVO, OBE (November 5, 1938 – December 8, 2000), was a political figure from the Pacific nation of Tuvalu. He represented the constituency of Funafuti in the Parliament of Tuvalu. He was the fifth Prime Minister of Tuvalu from 27 April 1999 until his death on 8 December 2000.

Koloa Talake

The Rt Hon Koloa Talake (7 June 1934 – 26 May 2008) was a political figure from the Pacific nation of Tuvalu. He represented the constituency of Vaitupu in the Parliament of Tuvalu. He served as finance minister and was the prime minister for a short period of time.

Lagitupu Tuilimu

The Rt Hon Lagitupu Tulimu is a political figure from the Pacific nation of Tuvalu, who represented the constituency of Nanumea. He served as the Acting Prime Minister of Tuvalu from 8 December 2000 to 24 February 2001 following the death of incumbent Ionatana Ionatana.

List of Tuvaluans

This is a list of notable people from Tuvalu.

Eselealofa Apinelu

Opetaia Foa'i

Apisai Ielemia

Ionatana Ionatana

Kamuta Latasi

Toaripi Lauti

Tupua Leupena

Faimalaga Luka

Tulaga Manuella

Bikenibeu Paeniu

Seve Paeniu

Tomasi Puapua

Tomu Sione

Saufatu Sopoanga

Koloa Talake

Filoimea Telito

Fiatau Penitala Teo

Maatia Toafa

Lagitupu Tuilimu

Solofa Uota

Politics of Tuvalu

The politics of Tuvalu takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic monarchy, whereby the Monarch is the head of state, represented by the Governor-General, while the Prime Minister is the head of government. Executive power is exercised by the government.

The Constitution of Tuvalu states that it is "the supreme law of Tuvalu" and that "all other laws shall be interpreted and applied subject to this Constitution"; it sets out the Principles of the Bill of Rights and the Protection of the Fundamental Rights and Freedoms. In 1986 the Constitution adopted upon independence was amended in order to give attention to Tuvaluan custom and tradition as well as the aspirations and values of the Tuvaluan people. The changes placed greater emphasis on Tuvaluan community values rather than Western concepts of individual freedom.Tuvalu follows the Westminster system of representative democracy although Tuvalu is a non-partisan democracy and elections in Tuvalu take place without reference to formal political parties. The Electoral Act was amended in December 1999 to increase the membership of parliament from 12 to 15 MPs. In August 2007 the Constitution was changed to increase the number of ministers from 5 to 7.Tuvaluans participated in the political institutions of the Gilbert and Ellice Islands Colony during the transition to self-determination. A referendum was held in December 1974 to determine whether the Gilbert Islands and Ellice Islands should each have their own administration. As a consequence of the referendum the Gilbert and Ellice Islands colony ceased to exist on 1 January 1976 and the separate British colonies of Kiribati and Tuvalu came into existence.In 2008 Tuvaluans rejected a constitutional referendum that proposed replacing the Queen of Tuvalu, with an elected president as the head of state.

Prime Minister of Tuvalu

The Prime Minister of Tuvalu is the head of government of Tuvalu. According to Tuvalu's constitution, the prime minister must always be a member of the Parliament, and is elected by parliament in a secret ballot. Because there are no political parties in Tuvalu, any member of parliament can be nominated for the role. Following parliament vote the Governor-General of Tuvalu is responsible for swearing the prime minister in.

The office of prime minister was established when Tuvalu gained independence in 1978, although the post is sometimes considered to be a continuation of the earlier office of chief minister, which was created in 1975. If the prime minister dies, as has happened on one occasion, the deputy prime minister becomes acting prime minister until a new one is elected by parliament. The prime minister can lose his office by resigning, being defeated in a no confidence vote by parliament, or losing his seat in a parliamentary election.

Several former prime ministers have been appointed the Governor-General of Tuvalu.

Samuelu Teo

Samuelu Penitala Teo is a Tuvaluan politician. He is the son of Sir Fiatau Penitala Teo who was appointed as the first Governor General of Tuvalu (1978–1986) following independence from Great Britain.He was first elected to the Parliament of Tuvalu at the 1998 general election to represent the constituency of Niutao. He served as the Minister of Works, Energy and Communications in the governments led by Ionatana Ionatana (1999-2000) and Lagitupu Tuilimu (2000-2001). He was the Minister for Natural Resources in the governments led by Faimalaga Luka (2001) and Koloa Talake (2001–2002). He was re-elected in the Tuvaluan general election, 2002, then lost his seat in the Tuvaluan general election, 2006 when the vote of the Tuvaluan electorate resulted in the election of 8 new members to the 15 member parliament.Samuelu Teo was again elected to represent Niutao in the Tuvaluan general election, 2015. The 2015 election was strongly contested with 6 candidates including the two incumbent MPs (Vete Sakaio and Fauoa Maani) and three former MPs (Sir Tomu Sione, Tavau Teii and Teo).

Saufatu Sopoanga

Saufatu Sopoanga, OBE (born 22 February 1952) is a political figure from the Pacific nation of Tuvalu. Sopoanga was the eighth Prime Minister of Tuvalu and a foreign minister of Tuvalu. He is the elder brother of Enele Sopoaga, who was appointed as Prime Minister of Tuvalu in 2013.

There are no political parties in Tuvalu. During his term as prime minister Sapoanga had a shifting alliance of MPs who supported him, and there was also an opposition group against him. Both Sapoanga's group and the opposition group were plagued by defections; a series of by-elections also created uncertainty as to which side would emerge with a parliamentary majority. The survival of his government has been described as resulting from his dexterous handling of the distribution of ministerial and other appointments.On 26 August 2004, while one of the 15 members of parliament was sick in New Zealand and another had defected from Sapoanga's group, the opposition finally Sapoanga to resign in a no confidence vote, 8–6.

Speaker of the Parliament of Tuvalu

The Speaker of the Parliament of Tuvalu is the presiding officer of that legislature - the Parliament of Tuvalu (Palamene o Tuvalu).

Tomasi Puapua

Sir Tomasi Puapua (born 10 September 1938) is a political figure who represented Vaitupu in the Parliament of Tuvalu. He attended the Fiji School of Medicine and the Otago University Medical School. He is married to Riana Puapua.

Tomu Sione

Sir Tomu Malaefone Sione (17 November 1941 – April 2016) was a political figure from the Pacific nation of Tuvalu. He worked as a journalist from 1962–68. He was the head of the southern Niutao clan. He was married to Segali.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.