FIFA Women's World Rankings

The FIFA Women's World Rankings for football were introduced in 2003,[2] with the first rankings published in March of that year, as a follow-on to the existing Men's FIFA World Rankings. They attempt to compare the strength of internationally active women's national teams at any given time.

FIFA Women's World Rankings as of 12 July 2019.[1]
Rank Change Team Points
1 Steady  United States 2180
2 Steady  Germany 2059
3 Increase 5  Netherlands 2037
4 Steady  France 2029
5 Decrease 2  England 2027
6 Increase 3  Sweden 2021
7 Decrease 2  Canada 1976
8 Decrease 2  Australia 1965
9 Increase 2  North Korea 1940
10 Steady  Brazil 1938
11 Decrease 4  Japan 1937
12 Steady  Norway 1917
13 Steady  Spain 1899
14 Increase 1  Italy 1891
15 Increase 2  Denmark 1839
16 Steady  China PR 1838
17 Increase 5  Iceland 1822
18 Steady   Switzerland 1815
19 Increase 1  Belgium 1813
20 Decrease 6  South Korea 1805
*Change from 29 March 2019
Complete rankings at FIFA.com

Specifics of the ranking system

  • FIFA Women's World Rankings are based on every international match a team ever played, dating back to 1971, the first FIFA-recognized women's international between France and the Netherlands.
  • FIFA Women's World Rankings are implicitly weighted to emphasize recent results.
  • FIFA Women's World Rankings are only published four times a year. Normally, rankings are released in March, June, September and December. (In World Cup years, dates may be adjusted to reflect the World Cup results.)

The first two points result from the FIFA Women's World Rankings system being based on the Elo rating system adjusted for football; in 2018, FIFA modified the men's ranking system to similarly be based on Elo systems after continued criticism. FIFA considers the ratings for teams with fewer than 5 matches provisional and at the end of the list. Also any team that plays no matches for 18 months becomes unranked.

Leaders

To date Germany and the United States have been the only two teams to have led the rankings. They have also held the top two spots in all but five releases, when Germany was ranked third: Norway was in second position in the first two rankings until Germany overtook them by winning the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, Brazil was ranked second in March and June 2009 until Germany won 2009 Euro and rejoined the top two, and England reached the #2 ranking in March 2018.

The United States holds the record for the longest period leading the rankings of nearly 7 years, from March 2008 to December 2014.

Ranking procedure

The rankings are based on the following formulae:[2]

Where

= The team rating after the match
= The team rating before the match
= , the weighted importance of the match
= The actual result of the match, see below
= The expected result of the match
= The scaled difference in rating points between the teams
= The opposing team's rating before the match
= The "home advantage" correction, see below
= A scaling factor, see below
= The "Match Importance Factor", see below

The average points of all teams are about 1300 points. The top nations usually exceed 2000 points. In order to be ranked, a team must have played at least 5 matches against officially ranked teams, and have not been inactive for more than 18 months. Even if teams are not officially ranked, their points rating is kept constant until they play their next match.

Actual result of the match

The main component of the actual result is whether the team wins, loses, or draws, but goal difference is also taken into account.

If the match results in a winner and loser, the loser is awarded a percentage given by the accompanying table, with the result always less than or equal to 20% (for goal differences greater than zero). The result is based on the goal difference and the number of goals they scored. The remaining percentage points are awarded to the winner. For example, a 2–1 match has the result awarded 84%–16% respectively, a 4–3 match has the result awarded 82%–18%, and an 8–3 match has the result awarded 96.2%–3.8%. As such, it is possible for a team to lose points even if they win a match, assuming they did not "win by enough".

If the match ends in a draw the teams are awarded the same result, but the number depends on the goals scored so the results will not necessarily add up to 100%. For example, a 0–0 draws earns both teams 47% each, a 1–1 draw earns 50% each, and a 4–4 draw earns 52.5% each.[2]

Actual result table

Goal Difference
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 /+
Goals scored
by non winning team
Actual result (percentage)
0 47.0 / 47.0 85.0 / 15.0 92.0 / 8.0 96.0 / 4.0 97.0 / 3.0 98.0 / 2.0 99.0 / 1.0
1 50.0 / 50.0 84.0 / 16.0 91.1 / 8.9 95.2 / 4.8 96.3 / 3.7 97.4 / 2.6 98.5 / 1.5
2 51.0 / 51.0 83.0 / 17.0 90.2 / 9.8 94.4 / 5.6 95.6 / 4.4 96.8 / 3.2 98.0 / 2.0
3 52.0 / 52.0 82.0 / 18.0 89.3 / 10.7 93.6 / 6.4 94.9 / 5.1 96.2 / 3.8 97.5 / 2.5
4 52.5 / 52.5 81.0 / 19.0 88.4 / 11.6 92.8 / 7.2 94.2 / 5.8 95.6 / 4.4 97.0 / 3.0
5 53.0 / 53.0 80.0 / 20.0 87.5 / 12.5 92.0 / 8.0 93.5 / 6.5 95.0 / 5.0 96.5 / 3.5

Source[2]

Neutral ground or Home vs. Away

Historically, home teams earn 66% of the points available to them, with away teams earning the other 34%. To account for this, when two teams are not playing on neutral ground, the home team has its inflated by 100 points for the purposes of calculation. That is, if two equally ranked teams playing at one team's home ground, the home team would be expected to win at the same rate a team playing on neutral ground with a 100-point advantage. This 100 point difference corresponds to a 64%–36% advantage in terms of expected result.

This also helps define the scaling constant , which has a value of 200. In addition to a 100-point difference causing an expected result difference of 64%–36%, it also results in a 300-point difference causing expected results of 85%–15%.[2]

Importance of the match

Match importance Match importance
factor (M)
K-value
FIFA Women's World Cup match 4 60
Women's Olympic football tournament 4 60
FIFA Women's World Cup qualifier 3 45
Women's Olympic football qualifier 3 45
Women's Continental finals match 3 45
Women's Continental qualifier 2 30
Women's friendly match between two Top 10 teams 2 30
Women's friendly match 1 15

Ranking schedule

Rankings are published four times a year, usually on a Friday.[3]

2018 Rankings schedule
Release date
23 March
12 July
28 September
7 December

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 12 July 2019. Retrieved 12 July 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Fact Sheet, FIFA Women's World Ranking" (PDF). Retrieved 2015-06-08.
  3. ^ "Women's Ranking Procedure". FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking. FIFA. Retrieved 11 January 2018.

External links

2016 OFC Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament

The 2016 OFC Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament was the 4th edition of the OFC Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament, the quadrennial international football competition organised by the Oceania Football Confederation (OFC) to determine which women's national teams from Oceania qualify for the Olympic football tournament.

The tournament consisted of two stages. The first stage was the Pacific Games women's football tournament, where the highest-ranked team who is a member of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) advanced to the second stage. The second stage was a two-legged play-off between the first stage qualifier and New Zealand, OFC's highest ranked team in the FIFA Women's World Rankings. The winner of the second stage qualified for the 2016 Summer Olympics women's football tournament in Brazil.New Zealand qualified for their third straight Olympics after the second leg of their final play-off against Papua New Guinea was cancelled due to visa issues preventing Papua New Guinea's team from travelling to New Zealand for the match.

2017 SheBelieves Cup

The 2017 SheBelieves Cup was the second edition of the SheBelieves Cup, an invitational women's football tournament held in the United States. It took place between March 1 and 7, 2017.The four teams were ranked No. 1, 2, 3 and 5 in the FIFA Women's World rankings, thus making the tournament the most important friendly Cup of the year. The Algarve Cup ran in parallel as well as the Cyprus Cup. France won the tournament for the first time, winning two and drawing one of their games in the process.

Anguilla women's national football team

Anguilla women's national football team is the national team of Anguilla, a British Overseas Territory in the Caribbean, and is controlled by the Anguilla Football Association. It is affiliated to the Caribbean Football Union of CONCACAF. As of November 2015, it remains unranked on the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

Azerbaijan women's national football team

The Azerbaijan women's national football team represents Azerbaijan in international women's football. They are currently 67th in the FIFA Women's World Rankings. Azerbaijan has never qualified for any international tournament. The majority of Azerbaijan's home matches are held at the national stadium, Tofiq Bahramov Stadium.

Bahrain women's national football team

The Bahrain Women's National Football Team was first formed in 2003. The team represents Bahrain in international women's football and thus falls under the governance of the Bahrain Football Association; more specifically run by the women's committee at the Association. Although participating in several friendly tournaments, the team played its first official international match against the Maldives on April 22, 2007 and entered the FIFA Women's World Rankings in June 2007 at 111th out of 142.

CONCACAF

The Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF KON-kə-kaf; typeset for branding purposes since 2018 as Concacaf) is one of FIFA's 6 continental governing bodies for association football. Its 41 members include nations and territories in North America, including Central America and the Caribbean. Three geographically South American entities are also members — Guyana, Suriname, and the French overseas department of French Guiana and Martinique. CONCACAF's primary functions are to organize competitions for national teams and clubs, and to conduct World Cup and Women's World Cup qualifying tournaments.

CONCACAF was founded in its current form on 18 September 1961 in Mexico City, Mexico, with the merger of the NAFC and the CCCF, which made it one of the then five, now six continental confederations affiliated with FIFA. Canada, Costa Rica, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Netherlands Antilles (Curaçao), Nicaragua, Panama, Suriname and United States were founding members.CONCACAF is the third-most successful FIFA confederation. Mexico dominated CONCACAF men's competition early on and has since won the most Gold Cups since the beginning of the tournament in its current format. The Mexican national team is the only CONCACAF team to win an official FIFA tournament by winning the 1999 FIFA Confederations Cup. Mexico and the U.S. have won all but one of the editions of the CONCACAF Gold Cup. In recent years Costa Rica and Panama have become powers in the region; in 2014, Costa Rica became the 4th CONCACAF country after the United States, Cuba, and Mexico to make the World Cup quarterfinals, while Panama became the eleventh country from the confederation to participate in the World Cup in 2018. The United States has been very successful in the women's game, being the only CONCACAF member to win all three major worldwide competitions in women's football — the World Cup (4), the Olympics (4), and the Algarve Cup (10). Canada is the only other member to win at least one of the major competitions, winning the Algarve Cup in 2016.

Eritrea women's national football team

The Eritrea women's national football team is the national women's football team of Eritrea and is overseen by the Eritrean National Football Federation (ENFF), the governing body of football in Eritrea. It has neither qualified for the finals of the FIFA Women's World Cup nor the Africa Women Cup of Nations.

It is managed by Ghezai Tesfagabir and plays its home games in Asmara. Eritrea is currently unranked in the FIFA Women's World Rankings for being inactive for more than 18 months.

FIFA World Rankings

The FIFA World Ranking is a ranking system for men's national teams in association football, currently led by Belgium. The teams of the member nations of FIFA, football's world governing body, are ranked based on their game results with the most successful teams being ranked highest. The rankings were introduced in December 1992, and eight teams (Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and Spain) have held the top position, of which Brazil have spent the longest ranked first.

A points system is used, with points being awarded based on the results of all FIFA-recognised full international matches.

The ranking system has been revamped on several occasions, generally responding to criticism that the preceding calculation method did not effectively reflect the relative strengths of the national teams. The current version of the ranking system was first used on 16 August 2018, adapted from the Elo rating system used in chess and Go.

Football in China

Football in China consists of association football (Chinese: 足球; pinyin: zúqiú) as well as the China national football team. Modern football has been one of the most well supported sports in China, since it was introduced in the early 1900s. The country was erroneously recognised by disgraced former FIFA president Joseph "Sepp" Blatter as the first to invent football, 5000 years ago through Tsu' Chu, an ancient Chinese ball game (although there is no lineage between Tsu' Chu or Cuju and modern football). It is universally accepted that football was officially formalised in England in 1863, originating from a simple game that had been played for many centuries between villages in England. .

The national governing body is the Chinese Football Association (CFA). Hong Kong and Macau have separate national teams and leagues. Association football is the most popular spectator sport in China, followed by basketball.

According to FIFA ranking on 10/08/2017, the Men's National Team is ranked 77th in the world, and according to FIFA women's world rankings on 23/6/2017, the Women's National Team is ranked 14th.

Futsal at the 2018 Summer Youth Olympics

The futsal competition at the 2018 Summer Youth Olympics was held from 7 to 18 October. At Tecnópolis and the CeNARD, the first one located in Villa Martelli, and the second one in Buenos Aires. There are two tournaments, one for boys and one for girls.

India women's national football team

The India women's national football team is controlled by the All India Football Federation and represents India in women's international football competitions. The women's team resumed playing on 7 September 2012 after nearly a year-long hiatus. Under the global jurisdiction of FIFA and governed in Asia by the AFC, the team is also part of the South Asian Football Federation. The team was one of the best teams in Asia in the mid 70s to early 80s, when they became runners-up at 1979 and 1983 AFC Women's Asian Cup. Presently, the Indian team has won all the SAFF Women's Championship that they have participated in since 2010.

The team has yet to participate in the FIFA Women's World Cup and Olympic Games, and failed to participate in the last 5 Asian Cups since 2003 at Thailand, as their last participation. Present ranking of the team according to FIFA Women's World Rankings is 63 and 13th among the Asian countries.

Ivory Coast women's national football team

The Ivory Coast women's national football team represents Ivory Coast in international women's football and is controlled by the Ivorian Football Federation. They played their first international match in 1988. The team is currently ranked 64th in the FIFA Women's World Rankings and as the 6th best team in CAF.

Mali women's national football team

Mali women's national football team represents Mali in women's international football and is overseen by the Malian Football Federation, the governing body for football in Mali. They play their home matches at the Stade Modibo Kéïta, a multi-purpose stadium located in the city of Bamako.

Currently, Mali is ranked 85th in FIFA Women's World Rankings. They have never qualified for a FIFA Women's World Cup, but made a total of six appearances in the Africa Women Cup of Nations since the 2002 edition.

Malta women's national football team

The Malta women's national football team represents the Malta Football Association in international women's football matches sanctioned by UEFA. As of June 2017, Malta ranks 94th in the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

Moldova women's national football team

The Moldova women's national football team is the women's national football team of Moldova. It took part in the UEFA qualification stages of the 2003 and 2007 World Cups, ending bottom in their group both times, and currently plays in UEFA Women's Euro 2017 qualifying. Moldova is ranked 89th in the FIFA Women's World Rankings as of June 2017.Moldova also still competes in the Under-19 and Under-17 European Championships' qualification stages with its U-19 and U-17 women's national teams.

Netherlands women's national football team

The Netherlands women's national football team (Dutch: Nederlands vrouwenvoetbalelftal) is directed by the Royal Dutch Football Association (KNVB), which is a member of UEFA and FIFA.

In 1971, the team played the first women's international football match recognized by FIFA against France. They have played at the final tournament of the 2009, 2013, and 2017 UEFA Women's Championship and were champions in 2017. They have played at the final tournament of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time, and reached thirteenth place. They have also played at the final tournament in the 2019 edition, losing 2-0 the final against the United States.

The nicknames for the team are Oranje (Orange) and Leeuwinnen (Lionesses). Sarina Wiegman has been head coach since January 2017. As of July 2019, the team is ranked number 3 in the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

Scotland women's national football team

The Scotland women's national football team represents Scotland in international women's football competitions. Since 1998, the team has been governed by the Scottish Football Association (SFA). Scotland qualified for the FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time in 2019, and qualified for their first UEFA Women's Euro in 2017. As of July 2019, the team was 22nd in the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

Togo women's national football team

The Togo women's national football team (French: Équipe du Togo féminine de football) represents the Togolese Republic in women's international football competition since 2006. Togo is managed by the Togolese Football Federation (FTF), the governing body of football in Togo. The team has played five FIFA-recognised matches, in 2006 and 2007, before reappearing in the 2018 WAFU Women's Cup, set in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. Their manager since January 2018 is Kaï Tomety. Togo's home stadium is the Stade de Kégué, located in Lomé.

Togo has never qualified for a FIFA World Cup or an Africa Women Cup of Nations. Currently, they are unranked on the FIFA Women's World Rankings for not having played more than five matches against officially ranked teams.

World Football Elo Ratings

The World Football Elo Ratings is a ranking system for men's national association football teams that is published by the website eloratings.net. It is based on the Elo rating system but includes modifications to take various football-specific variables into account, like the margin of victory, importance of a match, and home field advantage. Other implementations of the Elo rating system are possible and there is no single nor any official Elo ranking for football teams.

Since being developed, the Elo rankings have been found to have the highest predictive capability for football matches. FIFA's official rankings, both the FIFA World Rankings for men and the FIFA Women's World Rankings are based on a modified version of the Elo formula, the men's rankings having switched away from FIFA's own system for matches played since June 2018.

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