FIA World Endurance Championship

The FIA World Endurance Championship is an auto racing world championship organized by the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO) and sanctioned by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA). The series supersedes the ACO's former Intercontinental Le Mans Cup which began in 2010, and is the first endurance series of world championship status since the demise of the World Sportscar Championship at the end of 1992. The World Endurance Championship name was previously used by the FIA from 1981 to 1985.

The series features multiple classes of cars competing in endurance races, with sports prototypes competing in the Le Mans Prototype categories, and production-based grand tourers competing in the LM GTE categories. World champion titles are awarded to the top scoring manufacturers and drivers over the season,[1][2] while other cups and trophies will be awarded for drivers and private teams.[3]

FIA World Endurance Championship
FIA WEC logo
CategoryEndurance racing
RegionInternational
Inaugural season2012
Prototype ClassesLMP1, LMP2
GT ClassesLMGTE Pro, LMGTE Am
TeamsAbout 20
Tyre suppliersMichelin, Dunlop
Drivers' champion
Teams' champion
Makes' championLMGTE: Porsche
Official websitefiawec.com
Motorsport current event.svg Current season

Format

The World Endurance Championship was first run in 2012 as a replacement for the Intercontinental Le Mans Cup.[4]

The World Endurance Championship follows much of the format of the Intercontinental Le Mans Cup and features nine endurance races across the world, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans, with all races being at least six hours in duration.[2] The calendar includes four races in Europe, two in the Americas, two in Asia and one in the Middle East,[5] with a possible future expansion.[6] There are four categories: LMP1 and LMP2 prototypes and the GTE category, divided into GTE Pro for teams with professional driver line-ups, and GTE Am for teams featuring a mixture of amateur drivers.

Eight titles are awarded each season based on total point tally, with four being deemed world championships: World Endurance LMP1 Championship, World Endurance GTE Manufacturers' Championship, World Endurance LMP Drivers' Championship and World Endurance GTE Drivers' Championship. The points system is similar to that used in the FIA's other world championships, awarding points to the top ten finishers on a sliding point margin scale from first to tenth. Cars finishing the race but classified eleventh or further are awarded a half point. For the 24 Hours of Le Mans points are worth roughly 1.5x as much (i.e. 25 points for a win is worth 38 points at Le Mans).[7]

Future

Faced with declining manufacturer interest, the FIA commissioned a study into the future regulations of the category. Known as "Hypercar", the proposal called for move away from Le Mans Prototype entries and less reliance on hybrid technologies. The proposal was designed to make the championship more appealing to car manufacturers and cited flagship models such as the Aston Martin Vulcan and McLaren Senna GTR as examples of the cars the category was hoping to attract.[8][9]

Races

Current races

Race Circuit
6 Hours of Silverstone United Kingdom Silverstone Circuit
WEC 6 Heures de Spa-Francorchamps Belgium Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps
24 Heures du Mans France Circuit de la Sarthe
1000 Miles of Sebring United States Sebring International Raceway
6 Hours of Fuji Japan Fuji Speedway
6 Hours of Shanghai China Shanghai International Circuit

Returning races

Race Circuit Former seasons Returning season
6 Hours of São Paulo Brazil Autódromo José Carlos Pace 2012 to 2014 2019–20
6 Hours of Bahrain Bahrain Bahrain International Circuit 2012 to 2017 2019–20

Former races

Race Circuit Seasons
12 Hours of Sebring United States Sebring International Raceway Only 2012
6 Hours of Circuit of the Americas United States Circuit of the Americas 2013 to 2017
6 Hours of Nürburgring Germany Nürburgring 2015 to 2017
6 Hours of Mexico Mexico Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez 2016 & 2017

See also

References

  1. ^ "2012 FIA World Endurance Championship". fia.com. Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. 2011-06-03. Archived from the original on 2011-06-06. Retrieved 2011-06-04.
  2. ^ a b "World Motor Sport Council". fia.com. Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. 2011-06-03. Archived from the original on 2011-06-06. Retrieved 2011-06-04.
  3. ^ "The FIA World Endurance Championship is unveiled!". lemans.org. Automobile Club de l'Ouest. 2011-06-09. Archived from the original on 2011-06-16. Retrieved 2011-06-09.
  4. ^ ten Caat, Marcel (3 June 2011). "FIA announces World Endurance Championship". Planetlemans.com. Archived from the original on 12 November 2011. Retrieved 12 November 2011.
  5. ^ "Calendar, FIA World Endurance Championship". Archived from the original on 2017-03-22. Retrieved 2014-02-12.
  6. ^ Marcel ten Caat (2011-06-09). "Le Mans Press Conference: 2012 and further". planetlemans.com. Planet Le Mans. Retrieved 2011-06-09.
  7. ^ "Points – FIA World Endurance Championship". www.fiawec.com (in French). Retrieved 2018-06-18.
  8. ^ Watkins, Gary (7 June 2018). "FIA gives green light to WEC's 'hypercar' LMP1 prototype successor". autosport.com. Retrieved 11 June 2018.
  9. ^ Coch, Mat (8 June 2018). "FIA announces 'hypercar' rules for 2020/21 WEC season". speedcafe.com. Retrieved 11 June 2018.

External links

2012 FIA World Endurance Championship

The 2012 FIA World Endurance Championship was the inaugural running of the World Endurance Championship. It was co-organised by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) and the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO). The series replaced the former Intercontinental Le Mans Cup held by the ACO from 2010 to 2011. The series was open to Le Mans Prototypes and grand tourer-based racing cars meeting four ACO categories. Several championships, cups, and trophies were awarded in the series' four categories following an eight race season, with a World Championship available to the top scoring drivers and LMP1 category manufacturer.

Following a partial-season match-up against newcomers Toyota, Audi won the Manufacturers' World Championship, while the company's driver line-up of André Lotterer of Germany, Benoît Tréluyer of France, and Marcel Fässler of Switzerland earned the Drivers' World Championship ahead of their teammates Allan McNish and Tom Kristensen. Toyota's Alexander Wurz and Nicolas Lapierre were third in the Drivers' Championship standings. Ferrari defending their two Intercontinental Le Mans Cup LMGTE manufacturers title with the Manufacturers' World Cup, outscoring Porsche and Corvette. In the four FIA Trophies for the four categories in the championship, Rebellion Racing won the LMP1 Privateers title, while Starworks Motorsport secured the LMP2 championship; AF Corse won the LMGTE Pro category for the second season in a row, as did Larbre Compétition in LMGTE Am.

2013 FIA World Endurance Championship

The 2013 FIA World Endurance Championship season was the second season of the FIA World Endurance Championship auto racing series, co-organized by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) and the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO). The series was open to Le Mans Prototypes and grand tourer-style racing cars meeting four ACO categories. World Championships were awarded to drivers and to LMP1 category manufacturers, and several World Cups and Endurance Trophies were awarded for the series' other categories. The eight race championship began in April at the Silverstone Circuit and ended in November at the Bahrain International Circuit. The season was marred by the death of Allan Simonsen in the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

2014 FIA World Endurance Championship

The 2014 FIA World Endurance Championship season was the third season of the FIA World Endurance Championship auto racing series, co-organized by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) and the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO). The series was open to Le Mans Prototypes and grand tourer-style racing cars from four ACO categories. World Championship titles were awarded for Le Mans Prototypes drivers and for LMP1 manufacturers, and several World Endurance Cups and Endurance Trophies were also awarded. The eight race series began in April at the Silverstone Circuit and concluded in November at the Autódromo José Carlos Pace.

The World Endurance Championship for Drivers was won by Toyota Racing pairing Anthony Davidson and Sébastien Buemi, as they won four of the season's eight races. Davidson and Buemi finished as champions by 39 points, ahead of Audi Sport Team Joest trio Marcel Fässler, André Lotterer and Benoît Tréluyer, who won successive races at Le Mans and the Circuit of the Americas. Ten points further behind in third place, was the Porsche Team's Romain Dumas, Neel Jani and Marc Lieb. With their victory in São Paulo, Dumas, Jani and Lieb gained the tie-break over Audi Sport Team Joest's Lucas di Grassi and Tom Kristensen. The season's other event was won by the sister Toyota team of Mike Conway, Stéphane Sarrazin and Alexander Wurz in Bahrain, while Nicolas Lapierre was a part of the winning team at Silverstone and Spa with Davidson and Buemi. With five wins, Toyota won the World Endurance Championship for Manufacturers, 45 points ahead of Audi. Rebellion Racing won the two privateer trophies on offer for the LMP1-L cars, winning all eight races; five wins for the No. 12 entry of Mathias Beche, Nick Heidfeld and Nicolas Prost, with three wins for the sister No. 13 entry of Andrea Belicchi, Dominik Kraihamer and Fabio Leimer.

Consistent finishing within the LMP2 class was enough to give the No. 27 entry from SMP Racing the FIA Endurance Trophy for the class, while Sergey Zlobin won the drivers' championship. Despite only winning at Le Mans – which awarded double points, where he was partnered with Anton Ladygin and Mika Salo – Zlobin, achieved six podium finishes with four different teammates and won the championship by nine points. G-Drive Racing, with drivers Julien Canal, Olivier Pla and Roman Rusinov won four races, but retirements at Le Mans and São Paulo ultimately denied them the titles. Similarly, seven points further in arrears, KCMG with drivers Richard Bradley and Matthew Howson won three races but also suffered two retirements at Le Mans and Shanghai. Tsugio Matsuda (Circuit of the Americas) and Alexandre Imperatori (Bahrain and São Paulo) were also part of winning KCMG teams, but did not contest the whole season.

In the GT element of the series, the World Endurance Cup was won by AF Corse and drivers Gianmaria Bruni and Toni Vilander. Bruni and Vilander took 4 victories during the season, and finished 33.5 points clear of the next best driver Frédéric Makowiecki, driving for Porsche Team Manthey. Makowiecki won twice during the season, winning with Marco Holzer and Richard Lietz at Silverstone, and with Patrick Pilet in Shanghai. Lietz and Pilet finished third and fourth in the standings respectively. The only other winners in the GT standings as a whole, was Aston Martin Racing at the Circuit of the Americas and São Paulo, with drivers Stefan Mücke and Darren Turner. In the Endurance Trophy for LMGTE Pro teams standings, AF Corse finished 20 points clear of Porsche Team Manthey. In the separate sub-classifications for the LMGTE amateur class, Aston Martin Racing won seven out of the eight races, to take a 1–2 in the teams' championship. In the drivers' championship, David Heinemeier Hansson and Kristian Poulsen won the title with four wins and four second places. They finished 34 points clear of the sister entry of Paul Dalla Lana, Pedro Lamy and Christoffer Nygaard, who won a trio of races. Third place went to Nicki Thiim, 20 points further adrift, who was a part of the Heinemeier Hansson-Poulsen entry at 5 events. The season's other winners were AF Corse at Spa, with drivers Marco Cioci, Luís Pérez Companc and Mirko Venturi.

2015 FIA World Endurance Championship

The 2015 FIA World Endurance Championship season was the fourth season of the FIA World Endurance Championship auto racing series, co-organized by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) and the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO). The series was open to Le Mans Prototypes and grand tourer-style racing cars meeting four ACO categories. World championship titles were awarded for Le Mans Prototypes drivers and for manufacturers in the LMP1 category, and several World Endurance Cups and Endurance Trophies were also awarded in all four categories. The season began at the Silverstone Circuit in April and ended at the Bahrain International Circuit in November after eight rounds, and included the 83rd running of the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

Porsche secured the World Manufacturers' Championship at the 6 Hours of Shanghai, beating Audi by eighty points. Porsche's Timo Bernhard, Mark Webber, and Brendon Hartley won the World Drivers' Championship in the final round of the season, ahead of Audi's André Lotterer, Benoît Tréluyer, and Marcel Fässler. Porsche teammates Marc Lieb, Romain Dumas, and Neel Jani were third in the championship standings. Bernhard, Webber, and Hartley won four consecutive races over the course of the season. Porsche also won the World Endurance Cup for GT Manufacturers in the final event, overcoming the lead held by Ferrari earlier in the season. Richard Lietz of Porsche won the World Endurance Cup for GT Drivers over three-time defending Cup winner Gianmaria Bruni and his teammate Toni Vilander.

Rebellion Racing and their drivers Mathias Beche and Nicolas Prost won the trophies for LMP1 class private entries despite not participating in the first two rounds of the championship. The championships were Rebellion's fourth and Beche and Prost's second consecutive trophy titles respectively. Roman Rusinov, Julien Canal, and Sam Bird of G-Drive Racing secured the LMP2 class trophies over the KCMG team. Porsche Team Manthey won the LMGTE Professional category trophy for teams over Ferrari representative AF Corse. The LMGTE Amateur category trophies were won by SMP Racing and their drivers Viktor Shaitar, Aleksey Basov, and Andrea Bertolini, ahead of AF Corse's LMGTE Am entry.

2016 FIA World Endurance Championship

The 2016 FIA World Endurance Championship season was the fifth edition of the FIA World Endurance Championship auto racing series co-organised by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) and the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO). The series was open to Le Mans Prototypes and grand tourer-style racing cars meeting four ACO categories. The season began at the Silverstone Circuit in April and ended at the Bahrain International Circuit in November, and included the 84th running of the 24 Hours of Le Mans. This season was also the last WEC season for Audi Sport Team Joest as they decided not to race in the 2017 FIA World Endurance Championship Season.

2017 FIA World Endurance Championship

The 2017 FIA World Endurance Championship was the sixth season of the FIA World Endurance Championship, an auto racing series co-organised by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) and the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO). The series is open to Le Mans Prototypes and grand tourer-style racing cars divided into four categories. The season began at the Silverstone Circuit in April and will end at the Bahrain International Circuit in November, and include the 85th running of the 24 Hours of Le Mans. World championship titles will be awarded to the leading prototype drivers and manufacturers, while for the first time in the World Endurance Championship the leading grand touring drivers and manufacturers will also be awarded a world championship.

Following the 6 Hours of Fuji, the #2 Porsche drivers Timo Bernhard, Earl Bamber, and Brendon Hartley currently lead the World Endurance Drivers' Championship, the #38 Jackie Chan DC Racing crew of Ho-Pin Tung, Oliver Jarvis and Thomas Laurent lead the Endurance Trophies for LMP2 Drivers and Teams, the #51 AF Corse duo James Calado and Alessandro Pier Guidi lead the GT World Endurance Drivers' and Teams Championships, and the Proton Competition crew of Christian Ried, Marvin Dienst and Matteo Cairoli lead the Endurance Trophy for GTE-Am Drivers. The #61 Clearwater Racing entry leads the Endurance Trophy for GTE-Am Teams. Porsche lead the World Endurance Manufacturers' Championship, while Ferrari leads the GT World Endurance Manufacturers' Championship.

2018–19 FIA World Endurance Championship

The 2018–19 FIA World Endurance Championship was the seventh season of the FIA World Endurance Championship, an auto racing series co-organised by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) and the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO). The series is open to Le Mans Prototypes and grand tourer-style racing cars divided into four categories. The season marked the first move to a winter schedule for the championship, with the season starting at the Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps in May 2018 and concluding at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in June 2019. World championship titles were awarded for LMP drivers, GTE drivers, LMP1 teams and GTE manufacturers.

2019–20 FIA World Endurance Championship

The 2019–2020 FIA World Endurance Championship will be the eighth season of the FIA World Endurance Championship, an auto racing series co-organised by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) and the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO). The series is open to Le Mans Prototypes and grand tourer-style racing cars divided into four categories. World championship titles will be awarded to the leading manufacturers and drivers in both the prototype and grand tourer divisions. With the new winter scheduling format, the series will begin at Silverstone Circuit in September 2019 and end with the 24 Hours of Le Mans in June 2020.

AF Corse

AF Corse is an Italian auto racing team founded by former racing driver Amato Ferrari in 1995 in Piacenza. Strongly linked to the Maserati and Ferrari brands, AF Corse currently competes in the FIA World Endurance Championship, European Le Mans Series, Asian Le Mans Series, and International GT Open, and are four-time champions of the GT2 class of the former FIA GT Championship. The team has also entered cars under Advanced Engineering, AT Racing, Pecom Racing, Spirit of Race, Formula Racing and 8Star Motorsports, and in association with Michael Waltrip Racing (AF Waltrip).

Alessandro Pier Guidi

Alessandro Pier Guidi (born December 18, 1983) is a racing driver from Italy. He drove two races for the Italian A1 Team. Ferrari factory driver since 2017, he won LMGTE-PRO 2017 FIA World Endurance Championship and 2019 24 Hours of Le Mans

Pier Guidi drove a Ferrari 430 GT in the Spanish GT Championship and Italian GT Championship in 2005 and 2006, for the Scuderia Playteam. He won the 2005 Italian title, but missed out on the Spanish crown due to missing one race alongside team owner Giambasttista Giannocaro. In 2007 he moved to the FIA GT Championship, driving a Maserati MC12. He has also driven in the Italian Formula 3000 Championship.

In 2008 he drove the Galatasaray SK car in the Superleague Formula, scoring three podium finishes and taking the team to eighth overall in the final standings.

In 2014, driving a Level 5 Motorsport Ferrari F458 Italia, he won the GT Daytona (GTD) class at the Rolex 24 Hours of Daytona, one of the premier motor races in the American Tudor United SportsCar Championship.

In 2017, Ferrari reached a technical and racing agreement with Alessandro Pier Guidi. The Italian driver competed in the 2017 season of the FIA World Endurance Championship (WEC) pairing up with James Calado in the 488

GTE no. 51 managed on the track by the AF Corse team. Currently competing in the FIA World Endurance Championship for AF Corse, he is the current World Champion, alongside his fellow James Calado, in LMGTE Pro class, after winning the 2017 FIA World Endurance Championship.

Pier Guidi will thus join the other official Ferrari GT race drivers.

Dominik Kraihamer

Dominik Kraihamer (born 29 November 1989 in Oberndorf) is an Austrian racing driver, who competes in the FIA World Endurance Championship for ByKolles Racing Team.

DragonSpeed

DragonSpeed is an American racing team, currently competing in the European Le Mans Series, FIA World Endurance Championship and the 24 Hours of Le Mans. In 2019, the team entered the NTT IndyCar Series with a five race schedule, including the 103rd Indianapolis 500, with car #81 to be driven by Ben Hanley.

Frédéric Makowiecki

Frédéric Makowiecki (born 22 November 1980) is a French professional racing driver. He currently runs in the FIA World Endurance Championship with Porsche AG as a factory driver.

Kazuki Nakajima

Kazuki Nakajima (中嶋 一貴, Nakajima Kazuki, born January 11, 1985) is a professional racing driver who drove in Formula One for the Williams-Toyota team from 2007 to 2009. Racing for Toyota Gazoo Racing since 2016, he won the 2018 and 2019 24 Hours of Le Mans, and is 2018-19 World Endurance champion along with team-mates Fernando Alonso and Sébastien Buemi. He is the second FIA world champion from Japan after Toshi Arai.

Larbre Compétition

Larbre Compétition is a French auto racing team founded in 1988 by Jack Leconte. Based at the Circuit du Val de Vienne in Le Vigeant, Larbre has had considerable success in the Porsche Carrera Cup, French GT Championship, and international FIA GT Championship. Previously working with major automobile manufacturers like Porsche, Ferrari, and Chrysler, Larbre ran one of the factory Aston Martin squads in the Le Mans Series where they won the 2006 GT1 class championship.

For 2008 Larbre chose to enlist Saleen S7-Rs for the Le Mans Series and FFSA GT Championship. The team continued with the GT1 Saleens during the 2009 LMS season, but ACO denied an entry from them for the 2009 24 Hours of Le Mans.

For 2010 Larbre competed once again with the 10-year-old Saleen S7-R in the Le Mans Series, with drivers Fernando Rees, Gabriele Gardel and Patrice Goueslard. In 2010 24 Hours of Le Mans the team took the last ever LMGT1 class win with the aging Saleen S7-R, as well championship victories from both Le Mans Series and Intercontinental Le Mans Cup.

In 2011 the GT1 class got axed from ACO-sanctioned racing, and the old GT2 category (renamed as GTE) became the premier GT class. The team entered a Chevrolet Corvette C6.R into the GTE-Am division of the Le Mans Series and 24 Hours of Le Mans. The team won the GTE-Am category of the 2011 24 Hours of Le Mans with the Corvette and also took the second place with Porsche GT3 RSR. They also won the ILMC GTE-AM championship and thus became the first team to win a professional championship with a GT2-spec Corvette C6.R.

In 2012 and 2013, Larbre competed in the FIA World Endurance Championship with two GTE-Am class Corvette C6.Rs.

For 2014, Larbre competed in the first race of the European Le Mans Series season, the 4 Hours of Silverstone, with Keiko Ihara and Gustavo Yacamán driving a Morgan LMP2. The team also competed in the 24 Hours of Le Mans as an ELMS entry with the addition of Ricky Taylor.

For 2015, Larbre is currently competing with a Chevrolet Corvette C7.R in the GTE-Am class of the FIA World Endurance Championship with drivers Gianluca Roda, Paolo Ruberti, Kristian Poulsen, and Nicolai Sylvest. The team continues in the FIA World Endurance Championship in 2016, again with a Corvette C7.R racing in GTE-Am. The driver lineup consists of Yatuka Yamagishi, Pierre Ragues, and Paolo Ruberti.

Mike Conway

Mike Conway (born 19 August 1983) is a British professional racing driver. He lives in Sevenoaks, Kent and is currently competing in the FIA World Endurance Championship.

Nicki Thiim

Nicki Thiim (born 17 April 1989 in Sønderborg, Denmark) is a Danish professional racing driver, and Aston Martin Racing works driver in the FIA World Endurance Championship.

Rebellion Racing

Rebellion Racing is a Swiss racing team that competes in endurance racing. The team competed in the 2011 Intercontinental Le Mans Cup season and won the LMP1 teams' title in the 2011 Le Mans Series season. The team started as an association between Speedy Racing and Sebah Racing, which began in 2008. Rebellion Racing's team principal is Alexandre Pesci and the team manager is Bart Hayden.From 2011 to 2016 the team participated in the FIA World Endurance Championship in the LMP1 category as a privateer, with two Lola B12/60 cars from 2011 to 2013, and two Rebellion R-One cars from 2014 to 2016. In 2017 the team moved to the LMP2 category with two Oreca 07 cars.The team announced it would be withdrawing from the FIA World Endurance Championship after the 2019 edition of the Le Mans 24 Hours.

SMP Racing

SMP Racing is the motor sport endurance racing team and also motorsport management created in 2013 by Boris Rotenberg, founder of the SMP Bank of Russia.

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