FA Cup semi-finals

The FA Cup semi-finals are played to determine which teams will contest the FA Cup Final. They are the penultimate phase of the FA Cup, the oldest football tournament in the world.

Location

Wembley Stadium, illuminated
Since 2008, the new Wembley Stadium has been the home of the FA Cup semi-final.

The semi-finals have always been contested at neutral venues. Since 2008, all semi-finals have been held at Wembley. In the past any suitably large ground which was not the home ground of a team in that semi-final was used. Villa Park in Birmingham, Old Trafford in Manchester, and Hillsborough in Sheffield were common hosts.

All semi-finals between 1871 and 1881 were played at Kennington Oval. The first neutral semi-final match outside London took place in 1882 in Huddersfield.[1]

The 1989 semi-final between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest at Hillsborough, Sheffield, turned into tragedy when 96 supporters were killed in the stands due to overcrowding.[2] The Hillsborough disaster had wide-ranging effects on future stadium design. Liverpool were granted a special dispensation to avoid playing their 2012 semi-final match against Everton on the 23rd anniversary of the disaster.[3]

The 1991 semi-final between Arsenal and Tottenham Hotspur was the first to be played at Wembley, the traditional venue for the FA Cup Final. Two years later both semi-finals were held at Wembley after the Steel City derby between Sheffield clubs Wednesday and United was switched from the original venue of Elland Road, Leeds. This was repeated in 1994, although a replay between Manchester United and Oldham Athletic was held at Maine Road, Manchester.

From 1995 to 1999 and from 2001 to 2004 other neutral grounds were used, though in 2000 both matches were played at the old Wembley, in its final year of operation. In 2005 both semi-finals were played at the Millennium Stadium, Cardiff. However, in 2006 the FA decided to revert to the neutral ground system, with Villa Park and Old Trafford hosting the games.

In 2003, it was announced that all future semi-finals would be played at the new Wembley Stadium, once it had opened;[4] this took effect in 2008. The decision was mainly for financial reasons, to allow the FA to recoup some of the costs of rebuilding the stadium. However, the move was opposed by traditionalists and drew criticism from some supporters' groups.[5][6] Over a decade after the move, Aston Villa (amongst others) have called for the semi-finals to be regionalised once again.[7]

Tottenham Hotspur's 2018 semi-final was to some extent a home match for them, as they played their home games at Wembley that season while their new stadium was under construction. However for the semi-final the FA did not treat them as a home team.[8][9]

Format

Highfield Road - geograph-2008790
Highfield Road in Coventry (1982 image) hosted the only semi-final third replay in 1979–80.

In the past, there would be a replay if a semi-final match was drawn. If the replay was also drawn, there would be a second replay. In theory, an unlimited number of games could be played to obtain a winner. For example, in 1980 it took four games to decide the tie between Arsenal and Liverpool. This was the most games needed to settle an FA Cup semi-final, although there were several occasions when three games were played. Prior to the 1992 semi-finals, the only semi-final played under different rules to this was the rearranged 1989 semi-final between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest, for which it had been declared in advance that the game would be decided by extra time and penalties if necessary due to the Hillsborough Stadium disaster.

Queen's Park chose not to contest the 1871–72 replay match with Wanderers.

There were no semi-finals played in the 1872–73 competition. Under the rules at the time, holders Wanderers received a bye to the final. Queen's Park again decided not to contest a semi-final, so Oxford University advanced automatically.[10]

Between 1877–1881 only one semi-final was played due to the format of the competition leaving three teams remaining.

In 1991 the FA decided that only one replay should be played (starting with the 1991–92 competition). If this game ended in a draw, extra time would be played, followed by penalty kicks if the match was still even. In 1999 it was decided that the semi-finals should be decided in one game, with extra time and penalties if the score was level after 90 minutes. Replays are still used in earlier rounds, however, though they were eliminated in the quarter-finals in 2016. The last FA Cup semi-final replay, in 1999, saw Manchester United take on Arsenal at Villa Park.[11] This turned out to become one of the most memorable semi-finals of all time, with Peter Schmeichel saving a last-minute penalty from Dennis Bergkamp and a Ryan Giggs extra time goal deciding the outcome in Manchester United's favour. In 2003 this goal was voted the greatest ever in FA Cup history.

From 2016 to 2017, a fourth substitute was allowed in semi-final matches if the game went into extra time.[12]

Records

Villa Park
Villa Park in Birmingham hosted 55 semi-final matches between 1901 and 2007, more than any other stadium.

Villa Park is the most used stadium in FA Cup semi–final history, having hosted 55 semi–finals.[13]

The highest attendance for an FA Cup semi-final is 88,141 for Everton's penalty win over Manchester United on 19 April 2009.[14] It was the fourth semi-final to be played at the new Wembley Stadium.

The highest winning margin was Newcastle United's 6–0 victory over Fulham in the 1908 Anfield semi-final. The highest post-war winning margin was Stoke City's 5–0 victory over Bolton Wanderers in the second 2011 semi-final on 17 April 2011. The highest-scoring match was Hull City's 5–3 victory over Sheffield United in the second 2014 semi-final.

List of FA Cup semi-finals

Key

* Match went to extra time
Match decided by a penalty shootout after extra time
Bold Winning team won The Double
Italics Team from outside the top level of English football
(since the formation of The Football League in 1888)

Results

Year SF Winner Loser Score Venue
1872 1 Royal Engineers Crystal Palace 0–0 Kennington Oval
3–0 Kennington Oval
2 Wanderers Queen's Park 0–0 Kennington Oval
w/o [note 1]
1873 1 Oxford University Queen's Park w/o [note 2]
Bye Wanderers (holders)
1874 1 Oxford University Clapham Rovers 1–0 Kennington Oval
2 Royal Engineers Swifts 2–0 Kennington Oval
1875 1 Old Etonians Shropshire Wanderers 1–0 Kennington Oval
2 Royal Engineers Oxford University 1–1 Kennington Oval
1–0 Kennington Oval
1876 1 Old Etonians Oxford University 1–0 Kennington Oval
2 Wanderers Swifts 2–1 Kennington Oval
1877 1 Wanderers Cambridge University 1–0 Kennington Oval
Bye Oxford University
1878 1 Royal Engineers Old Harrovians 2–1 Kennington Oval
Bye Wanderers
1879 1 Old Etonians Nottingham Forest 2–1 Kennington Oval
Bye Clapham Rovers
1880 1 Oxford University Nottingham Forest 1–0 Kennington Oval
Bye Clapham Rovers
1881 1 Old Carthusians Darwen 4–1 Kennington Oval
Bye Old Etonians
1882 1 Blackburn Rovers The Wednesday 0–0 St John's Ground
5–1 Whalley Range
2 Old Etonians Marlow 5–0 Kennington Oval
1883 1 Blackburn Olympic Old Carthusians 4–0 Whalley Range
2 Old Etonians Notts County 2–1 Kennington Oval
1884 1 Blackburn Rovers Notts County 1–0 Aston Lower Grounds
2 Queen's Park Blackburn Olympic 4–1 Trent Bridge
1885 1 Blackburn Rovers Old Carthusians 5–1 Trent Bridge
2 Queen's Park Nottingham Forest 1–1 Racecourse Ground
3–0 Merchiston Castle School
1886 1 Blackburn Rovers Swifts 2–1 Racecourse Ground
2 West Bromwich Albion Small Heath Alliance 4–0 Aston Lower Grounds
1887 1 Aston Villa Rangers 3–1 Alexandra Recreation Ground
2 West Bromwich Albion Preston North End 3–1 Trent Bridge
1888 1 Preston North End Crewe Alexandra 4–0 Anfield
2 West Bromwich Albion Derby Junction 3–0 Victoria Ground
1889 1 Preston North End West Bromwich Albion 1–0 Bramall Lane
2 Wolverhampton Wanderers Blackburn Rovers 1–1 Alexandra Recreation Ground
3–1 Alexandra Recreation Ground
1890 1 Blackburn Rovers Wolverhampton Wanderers 1–0 Racecourse Ground
2 The Wednesday[note 3] Bolton Wanderers 2–1 Wellington Road
1891 1 Blackburn Rovers West Bromwich Albion 3–2 Victoria Ground
2 Notts County Sunderland 3–3 Bramall Lane
2–0 Bramall Lane
1892 1 Aston Villa Sunderland 4–1 Bramall Lane
2 West Bromwich Albion Nottingham Forest[note 3] 1–1 Molineux
1–1 Molineux
6–2 Racecourse Ground
1893 1 Everton Preston North End 2–2 Bramall Lane
0–0 Bramall Lane
2–1 Ewood Park
2 Wolverhampton Wanderers Blackburn Rovers 2–1 Town Ground
1894 1 Bolton Wanderers The Wednesday 2–1 Fallowfield Stadium
2 Notts County[note 4] Blackburn Rovers 1–0 Bramall Lane
1895 1 Aston Villa Sunderland 2–1 Ewood Park
2 West Bromwich Albion The Wednesday 2–0 Racecourse Ground
1896 1 The Wednesday Bolton Wanderers 1–1 Goodison Park
3–1 Town Ground
2 Wolverhampton Wanderers Derby County 2–1 Wellington Road
1897 1 Aston Villa Liverpool 3–0 Bramall Lane
2 Everton Derby County 3–2 Victoria Ground
1898 1 Derby County Everton 3–1 Molineux
2 Nottingham Forest Southampton[note 3] 1–1 Bramall Lane
2–0 Crystal Palace
1899 1 Derby County Stoke City 3–1 Molineux
2 Sheffield United Liverpool 2–2 Burnden Park
4–4 Burnden Park
[note 5] Fallowfield Stadium
1–0 Baseball Ground
1900 1 Bury Nottingham Forest 1–1 Victoria Ground
3–2 Bramall Lane
2 Southampton[note 3] Millwall Athletic[note 3] 0–0 Crystal Palace
3–0 Elm Park
1901 1 Sheffield United Aston Villa 2–2 City Ground
3–0 Baseball Ground
2 Tottenham Hotspur[note 3] West Bromwich Albion 4–0 Villa Park
1902 1 Sheffield United Derby County 2–2 The Hawthorns
1–1 Molineux
1–0 City Ground
2 Southampton[note 3] Nottingham Forest 3–1 White Hart Lane
1903 1 Bury Aston Villa 3–0 Goodison Park
2 Derby County Millwall Athletic[note 3] 3–0 Villa Park
1904 1 Bolton Wanderers[note 4] Derby County 1–0 Molineux
2 Manchester City The Wednesday 3–0 Goodison Park
1905 1 Aston Villa Everton 1–1 Victoria Ground
2–1 City Ground
2 Newcastle United The Wednesday 1–0 Hyde Road
1906 1 Everton Liverpool 2–0 Villa Park
2 Newcastle United Woolwich Arsenal 2–0 Victoria Ground
1907 1 Everton West Bromwich Albion[note 4] 2–1 Burnden Park
2 The Wednesday Woolwich Arsenal 3–1 St Andrew's
1908 1 Newcastle United Fulham[note 4] 6–0 Anfield
2 Wolverhampton Wanderers[note 4] Southampton[note 4] 2–0 Stamford Bridge
1909 1 Bristol City Derby County[note 4] 1–1 Stamford Bridge
2–1 St Andrew's
2 Manchester United Newcastle United 1–0 Bramall Lane
1910 1 Barnsley[note 4] Everton 0–0 Elland Road
3–0 Old Trafford
2 Newcastle United Swindon Town[note 3] 2–0 White Hart Lane
1911 1 Bradford City Blackburn Rovers 3–0 Bramall Lane
2 Newcastle United Chelsea[note 4] 3–0 St Andrew's
1912 1 Barnsley[note 4] Swindon Town[note 3] 0–0 Stamford Bridge
1–0 Meadow Lane
2 West Bromwich Albion Blackburn Rovers 0–0 Anfield
1–0* Hillsborough
1913 1 Aston Villa Oldham Athletic 1–0 Ewood Park
2 Sunderland Burnley[note 4] 0–0 Bramall Lane
3–2 St Andrew's
1914 1 Burnley Sheffield United 0–0 Old Trafford
1–0 Goodison Park
2 Liverpool Aston Villa 2–0 White Hart Lane
1915 1 Chelsea Everton 2–0 Villa Park
2 Sheffield United Bolton Wanderers 2–1 Ewood Park
1920 1 Aston Villa Chelsea 3–1 Bramall Lane
2 Huddersfield Town[note 4] Bristol City[note 4] 2–1 Stamford Bridge
1921 1 Tottenham Hotspur Preston North End 2–1 Hillsborough
2 Wolverhampton Wanderers[note 4] Cardiff City[note 4] 0–0 Anfield
3–1 Old Trafford
1922 1 Huddersfield Town Notts County[note 4] 3–1 Turf Moor
2 Preston North End Tottenham Hotspur 2–1 Hillsborough
1923 1 Bolton Wanderers Sheffield United 1–0 Old Trafford
2 West Ham United[note 4] Derby County[note 4] 5–2 Stamford Bridge
1924 1 Aston Villa Burnley 3–0 Bramall Lane
2 Newcastle United Manchester City 2–0 St Andrew's
1925 1 Cardiff City Blackburn Rovers 3–1 Meadow Lane
2 Sheffield United Southampton[note 4] 2–0 Stamford Bridge
1926 1 Bolton Wanderers Swansea Town[note 4] 3–0 White Hart Lane
2 Manchester City Manchester United 3–0 Bramall Lane
1927 1 Arsenal Southampton[note 4] 2–1 Stamford Bridge
2 Cardiff City Reading[note 4] 3–0 Molineux
1928 1 Blackburn Rovers Arsenal 1–0 Filbert Street
2 Huddersfield Town Sheffield United 2–2 Old Trafford
0–0 Goodison Park
1–0 Maine Road
1929 1 Bolton Wanderers Huddersfield Town 3–1 Anfield
2 Portsmouth Aston Villa 1–0 Highbury
1930 1 Arsenal Hull City[note 4] 2–2 Elland Road
1–0 Villa Park
2 Huddersfield Town Sheffield Wednesday 2–1 Old Trafford
1931 1 Birmingham Sunderland 2–0 Elland Road
2 West Bromwich Albion[note 4] Everton[note 4] 1–0 Old Trafford
1932 1 Arsenal Manchester City 1–0 Villa Park
2 Newcastle United Chelsea 2–1 Leeds Road
1933 1 Everton West Ham United[note 4] 2–1 Molineux
2 Manchester City Derby County 3–2 Leeds Road
1934 1 Manchester City Aston Villa 6–1 Leeds Road
2 Portsmouth Leicester City 4–1 St Andrew's
1935 1 Sheffield Wednesday Burnley[note 4] 3–0 Villa Park
2 West Bromwich Albion Bolton Wanderers[note 4] 1–1 Elland Road
2–0 Victoria Ground
1936 1 Arsenal Grimsby Town 1–0 Leeds Road
2 Sheffield United[note 4] Fulham[note 4] 2–1 Molineux
1937 1 Preston North End West Bromwich Albion 4–1 Highbury
2 Sunderland Millwall[note 6] 2–1 Leeds Road
1938 1 Huddersfield Town Sunderland 3–1 Ewood Park
2 Preston North End Aston Villa[note 4] 2–1 Bramall Lane
1939 1 Portsmouth Huddersfield Town 2–1 Highbury
2 Wolverhampton Wanderers Grimsby Town 5–0 Old Trafford
1946 1 Charlton Athletic Bolton Wanderers 2–0 Villa Park
2 Derby County Birmingham City 1–1 Hillsborough
4–1* Maine Road
1947 1 Charlton Athletic Newcastle United[note 4] 4–0 Elland Road
2 Burnley[note 4] Liverpool 0–0* Ewood Park
1–0 Maine Road
1948 1 Manchester United Derby County 3–1 Hillsborough
2 Blackpool Tottenham Hotspur[note 4] 3–1* Villa Park
1949 1 Wolverhampton Wanderers Manchester United 1–1 Hillsborough
1–0 Goodison Park
2 Leicester City[note 4] Portsmouth 3–1 Highbury
1950 1 Liverpool Everton 2–0 Maine Road
2 Arsenal Chelsea 2–2 White Hart Lane
1–0* White Hart Lane
1951 1 Newcastle United Wolverhampton Wanderers 0–0 Hillsborough
2–1 Leeds Road
2 Blackpool Birmingham City[note 4] 0–0 Maine Road
2–1 Goodison Park
1952 1 Arsenal Chelsea 1–1 White Hart Lane
3–0 White Hart Lane
2 Newcastle United Blackburn Rovers[note 4] 0–0 Hillsborough
2–1 Elland Road
1953 1 Blackpool Tottenham Hotspur 2–1 Villa Park
2 Bolton Wanderers Everton[note 4] 4–3 Maine Road
1954 1 Preston North End Sheffield Wednesday 2–0 Maine Road
2 West Bromwich Albion Port Vale[note 6] 2–1 Villa Park
1955 1 Manchester City Sunderland 1–0 Villa Park
2 Newcastle United York City[note 6] 1–1 Hillsborough
1–0 Roker Park
1956 1 Birmingham City Sunderland 3–0 Hillsborough
2 Manchester City Tottenham Hotspur 1–0 Villa Park
1957 1 Aston Villa West Bromwich Albion 2–2 Molineux
1–0 St Andrew's
2 Manchester United Birmingham City 2–0 Hillsborough
1958 1 Bolton Wanderers Blackburn Rovers[note 4] 2–1 Maine Road
2 Manchester United Fulham[note 4] 2–2 Villa Park
5–3 Highbury
1959 1 Luton Town Norwich City[note 6] 1–1 White Hart Lane
1–0 St Andrew's
2 Nottingham Forest Aston Villa 1–0 Hillsborough
1960 1 Blackburn Rovers Sheffield Wednesday 2–1 Maine Road
2 Wolverhampton Wanderers Aston Villa[note 4] 1–0 The Hawthorns
1961 1 Leicester City Sheffield United[note 4] 0–0 Elland Road
0–0* City Ground
2–0* St Andrew's
2 Tottenham Hotspur Burnley 3–0 Villa Park
1962 1 Burnley Fulham 1–1 Villa Park
2–1 Filbert Street
2 Tottenham Hotspur Manchester United 3–1 Hillsborough
1963 1 Leicester City Liverpool 1–0 Hillsborough
2 Manchester United Southampton[note 4] 1–0 Villa Park
1964 1 Preston North End[note 4] Swansea Town[note 4] 2–1 Villa Park
2 West Ham United Manchester United 3–1 Hillsborough
1965 1 Liverpool Chelsea 2–0 Villa Park
2 Leeds United Manchester United 0–0 Hillsborough
1–0 City Ground
1966 1 Everton Manchester United 1–0 Burnden Park
2 Sheffield Wednesday Chelsea 2–0 Villa Park
1967 1 Chelsea Leeds United 1–0 Villa Park
2 Tottenham Hotspur Nottingham Forest 2–1 Hillsborough
1968 1 Everton Leeds United 1–0 Old Trafford
2 West Bromwich Albion Birmingham City[note 4] 2–0 Villa Park
1969 1 Leicester City West Bromwich Albion 1–0 Hillsborough
2 Manchester City Everton 1–0 Villa Park
1970 1 Chelsea Watford[note 4] 5–1 White Hart Lane
2 Leeds United Manchester United 0–0 Hillsborough
0–0* Villa Park
1–0 Burnden Park
1971 1 Arsenal Stoke City 2–2 Hillsborough
2–0 Villa Park
2 Liverpool Everton 2–1 Old Trafford
1972 1 Arsenal Stoke City 1–1 Villa Park
2–1 Goodison Park
2 Leeds United Birmingham City[note 4] 3–0 Hillsborough
1973 1 Leeds United Wolverhampton Wanderers 1–0 Maine Road
2 Sunderland[note 4] Arsenal 2–1 Hillsborough
1974 1 Liverpool Leicester City 0–0 Old Trafford
3–1 Villa Park
2 Newcastle United Burnley 2–0 Hillsborough
1975 1 Fulham[note 4] Birmingham City 1–1 Hillsborough
1–0* Maine Road
2 West Ham United Ipswich Town 0–0 Villa Park
2–1 Stamford Bridge
1976 1 Manchester United Derby County 2–0 Hillsborough
2 Southampton[note 4] Crystal Palace[note 6] 2–0 Stamford Bridge
1977 1 Manchester United Leeds United 2–1 Hillsborough
2 Liverpool Everton 2–2 Maine Road
3–0 Maine Road
1978 1 Arsenal Orient[note 4] 3–0 Stamford Bridge
2 Ipswich Town West Bromwich Albion 3–1 Highbury
1979 1 Arsenal Wolverhampton Wanderers 2–0 Villa Park
2 Manchester United Liverpool 2–2 Maine Road
1–0 Goodison Park
1980 1 Arsenal Liverpool 0–0 Hillsborough
1–1* Villa Park
1–1* Villa Park
1–0 Highfield Road
2 West Ham United[note 4] Everton 1–1 Villa Park
2–1 Elland Road
1981 1 Manchester City Ipswich Town 1–0* Villa Park
2 Tottenham Hotspur Wolverhampton Wanderers 2–2* Hillsborough
3–0 Highbury
1982 1 Queens Park Rangers[note 4] West Bromwich Albion 1–0 Highbury
2 Tottenham Hotspur Leicester City[note 4] 2–0 Villa Park
1983 1 Manchester United Arsenal 2–1 Villa Park
2 Brighton & Hove Albion Sheffield Wednesday[note 4] 2–1 Highbury
1984 1 Everton Southampton 1–0* Highbury
2 Watford Plymouth Argyle[note 6] 1–0 Villa Park
1985 1 Manchester United Liverpool 2–2* Goodison Park
2–1 Maine Road
2 Everton Luton Town 2–1* Villa Park
1986 1 Liverpool Southampton 2–0* White Hart Lane
2 Everton Sheffield Wednesday 2–1* Villa Park
1987 1 Coventry City Leeds United[note 4] 3–2* Hillsborough
2 Tottenham Hotspur Watford 4–1 Villa Park
1988 1 Liverpool Nottingham Forest 2–1 Hillsborough
2 Wimbledon Luton Town 2–1 White Hart Lane
1989 1 Liverpool Nottingham Forest [note 7] Hillsborough
3–1 Old Trafford
2 Everton Norwich City 1–0 Villa Park
1990 1 Manchester United Oldham Athletic[note 4] 3–3* Maine Road
2–1* Maine Road
2 Crystal Palace Liverpool 4–3* Villa Park
1991 1 Nottingham Forest West Ham United[note 4] 4–0 Villa Park
2 Tottenham Hotspur Arsenal 3–1 Wembley Stadium (Original)
1992 1 Liverpool Portsmouth[note 4] 1–1* Highbury
0–0†[note 8] Villa Park
2 Sunderland[note 4] Norwich City 1–0 Hillsborough
1993 1 Arsenal Tottenham Hotspur 1–0 Wembley Stadium (Original)
2 Sheffield Wednesday Sheffield United 2–1* Wembley Stadium (Original)
1994 1 Chelsea Luton Town[note 4] 2–0 Wembley Stadium (Original)
2 Manchester United Oldham Athletic 1–1* Wembley Stadium (Original)
4–1 Maine Road
1995 1 Everton Tottenham Hotspur 4–1 Elland Road
2 Manchester United Crystal Palace 2–2* Villa Park
2–0 Villa Park
1996 1 Manchester United Chelsea 2–1 Villa Park
2 Liverpool Aston Villa 3–0 Old Trafford
1997 1 Chelsea Wimbledon 3–0 Highbury
2 Middlesbrough Chesterfield[note 6] 3–3* Old Trafford
3–0 Hillsborough
1998 1 Arsenal Wolverhampton Wanderers[note 4] 1–0 Villa Park
2 Newcastle United Sheffield United[note 4] 1–0 Old Trafford
1999 1 Manchester United Arsenal 0–0* Villa Park
2–1* Villa Park
2 Newcastle United Tottenham Hotspur 2–0* Old Trafford
2000 1 Aston Villa Bolton Wanderers[note 4] 0–0†[note 9] Wembley Stadium (Original)
2 Chelsea Newcastle United 2–1 Wembley Stadium (Original)
2001 1 Arsenal Tottenham Hotspur 2–1 Old Trafford
2 Liverpool Wycombe Wanderers[note 6] 2–1 Villa Park
2002 1 Arsenal Middlesbrough 1–0 Old Trafford
2 Chelsea Fulham 1–0 Villa Park
2003 1 Arsenal Sheffield United[note 4] 1–0 Old Trafford
2 Southampton Watford[note 4] 2–1 Villa Park
2004 1 Manchester United Arsenal 1–0 Villa Park
2 Millwall[note 4] Sunderland[note 4] 1–0 Old Trafford
2005 1 Arsenal Blackburn Rovers 3–0 Millennium Stadium
2 Manchester United Newcastle United 4–1 Millennium Stadium
2006 1 Liverpool Chelsea 2–1 Old Trafford
2 West Ham United Middlesbrough 1–0 Villa Park
2007 1 Manchester United Watford 4–1 Villa Park
2 Chelsea Blackburn Rovers 2–1* Old Trafford
2008 1 Portsmouth West Bromwich Albion[note 4] 1–0 Wembley Stadium (New)
2 Cardiff City[note 4] Barnsley[note 4] 1–0 Wembley Stadium (New)
2009 1 Chelsea Arsenal 2–1 Wembley Stadium (New)
2 Everton Manchester United 0–0†[note 10] Wembley Stadium (New)
2010 1 Chelsea Aston Villa 3–0 Wembley Stadium (New)
2 Portsmouth Tottenham Hotspur 2–0* Wembley Stadium (New)
2011 1 Manchester City Manchester United 1–0 Wembley Stadium (New)
2 Stoke City Bolton Wanderers 5–0 Wembley Stadium (New)
2012 1 Liverpool Everton 2–1 Wembley Stadium (New)
2 Chelsea Tottenham Hotspur 5–1 Wembley Stadium (New)
2013 1 Wigan Athletic Millwall[note 4] 2–0 Wembley Stadium (New)
2 Manchester City Chelsea 2–1 Wembley Stadium (New)
2014 1 Arsenal Wigan Athletic[note 4] 1–1†[note 10] Wembley Stadium (New)
2 Hull City Sheffield United[note 6] 5–3 Wembley Stadium (New)
2015 1 Arsenal Reading[note 4] 2–1* Wembley Stadium (New)
2 Aston Villa Liverpool 2–1 Wembley Stadium (New)
2016 1 Manchester United Everton 2–1 Wembley Stadium (New)
2 Crystal Palace Watford 2–1 Wembley Stadium (New)
2017 1 Chelsea Tottenham Hotspur 4–2 Wembley Stadium (New)
2 Arsenal Manchester City 2–1* Wembley Stadium (New)
2018 1 Manchester United Tottenham Hotspur 2–1 Wembley Stadium (New)
2 Chelsea Southampton 2–0 Wembley Stadium (New)
2019 1 Manchester City Brighton and Hove Albion 1–0 Wembley Stadium (New)
2 Watford Wolverhampton Wanderers 3–2 Wembley Stadium (New)

Semi-finals table

Woolwich Arsenal v. Newcastle United, April 1906
Playing the first of their 28 semi-finals, Woolwich Arsenal (in dark shirts) faced Newcastle United (in striped shirts) at the Victoria Ground, Stoke in 1906.
A match at the Millennium Stadium - geograph.org.uk - 1772120
Arsenal against Blackburn Rovers was one of the 2005 semi-finals held at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff, taking the fixture out of England for the first time since 1885.
Middlesbrough West Ham FA Cup semi-final 2006
The pre-match line-ups at Villa Park for Middlesbrough versus West Ham United, 2006
Old Trafford football ground - geograph.org.uk - 1770907
Blackburn Rovers v Chelsea at Old Trafford in 2007: the last FA Cup semi-final before the event was moved to the new Wembley Stadium.
Arsenal vs Chelsea FA Cup 2009
Arsenal versus Chelsea in 2009 was one of several London derbies held at the national stadium
Wembley Manchester derby pre-kick-off (edited)
Manchester clubs City and United have reached the FA Cup semi-final a combined 40 times. The Manchester derby has twice been a semi-final.
Wembley Stadium 2014-04-13
In amongst Hull City fans at the 2014 all-Yorkshire semi-final against Sheffield United

Teams shown with an asterisk beside their name are no longer in existence. This table is updated after 2016–17 FA Cup.

Team Appearances Won Lost
Arsenal 29 20 9
Aston Villa 21 11 10
Barnsley 3 2 1
Birmingham City 9 2 7
Blackburn Olympic 2 1 1
Blackburn Rovers 18 8 10
Blackpool 3 3 0
Bolton Wanderers 14 7 7
Bradford City 1 1 0
Brighton and Hove Albion 1 1 0
Bristol City 2 1 1
Burnley 8 3 5
Bury 2 2 0
Cambridge University 1 0 1
Cardiff City[note 11] 4 3 1
Charlton Athletic 2 2 0
Chelsea 22 12 10
Chesterfield 1 0 1
Clapham Rovers* 1 0 1
Coventry City 1 1 0
Crewe Alexandra 1 0 1
Crystal Palace (1861)* 1 0 1
Crystal Palace (1905) 4 2 2
Darwen 1 0 1
Derby County 13 4 9
Derby Junction* 1 0 1
Everton 26 13 13
Fulham 6 1 5
Grimsby Town 2 0 2
Huddersfield Town 7 5 2
Hull City 2 1 1
Ipswich Town 3 1 2
Leeds United 8 4 4
Leicester City 7 4 3
Orient 1 0 1
Liverpool 24 14 10
Luton Town 4 1 3
Manchester City 13 10 3
Manchester United 28 19 9
Marlow 1 0 1
Middlesbrough 3 1 2
Millwall 5 1 4
Newcastle United 17 13 4
Norwich City 3 0 3
Nottingham Forest 12 3 9
Notts County 5 2 3
Old Carthusians 3 1 2
Old Etonians 5 5 0
Old Harrovians 1 0 1
Oldham Athletic 3 0 3
Oxford University 5 3 2
Plymouth Argyle 1 0 1
Port Vale 1 0 1
Portsmouth 7 5 2
Preston North End 10 7 3
Queen's Park[note 12] 3 2 1
Queens Park Rangers 1 1 0
Rangers[note 12] 1 0 1
Reading 2 0 2
Royal Engineers 4 4 0
Sheffield United 14 6 8
Sheffield Wednesday 16 6 10
Shropshire Wanderers* 1 0 1
Southampton 11 4 7
Stoke City 4 1 3
Sunderland 12 4 8
Swansea City[note 11] 2 0 2
Swifts* 3 0 3
Swindon Town 2 0 2
Tottenham Hotspur 20 9 11
Wanderers* 3 3 0
Watford 6 1 5
West Bromwich Albion 20 10 10
West Ham United 7 5 2
Wigan Athletic 2 1 1
Wimbledon* 2 1 1
Wolverhampton Wanderers 14 8 6
Wycombe Wanderers 1 0 1
York City 1 0 1

Venues

Hillsborough Finial Square
Semi-finals were held at Sheffield Wednesday's home ground Hillsborough for 85 years.
Main Stand, Maine Road, 1985
Maine Road (1985 image), dubbed the Wembley of the North, was used for semi-finals between 1928 and 1994.
Cricket, WG Grace, 1891- Kennington Oval
In the 19th century, seventeen FA Cup semi-final matches were held at the Kennington Oval (1891 image).
Bramall Lane - geograph.org.uk - 993721
Bramall Lane (1965 photo) hosted 17 semi-finals from 1889 to 1938; Sheffield has been host city on 51 occasions.
The old Wembley Stadium
The original Wembley Stadium began hosting semi-finals in 1991 with the North London derby.
Nottingham2
Meadow Lane, The City Ground and Trent Bridge in 2003: the extant three of Nottingham's four FA Cup semi-final hosts.
Venues that no longer exist or regularly host football matches are denoted with an asterisk.
Stadium City SF
matches
Year of
first SF
Most
recent SF
Kennington Oval* London 17 1872 1883
St John's Ground* Huddersfield 1 1882 1882
Whalley Range* Manchester 2 1882 1883
Aston Lower Grounds* Birmingham 2 1884 1886
Trent Bridge* West Bridgford 3 1884 1887
Racecourse Ground* Derby 5 1885 1890
Merchiston Castle School* Edinburgh, Scotland [note 13] 1 1885 1885
Alexandra Recreation Ground* Crewe 3 1887 1889
Anfield Liverpool 5 1888 1929
Victoria Ground* Stoke-on-Trent 7 1897 1935
Wellington Road* Perry Barr 2 1890 1896
Bramall Lane Sheffield 17 1889 1938
Molineux Wolverhampton 10 1892 1957
Ewood Park Blackburn 6 1893 1947
Town Ground* Nottingham 2 1893 1896
Fallowfield Stadium* Manchester 2 1894 1899
Goodison Park Liverpool 10 1896 1985
Crystal Palace* London 2 1898 1900
Burnden Park* Bolton 5 1899 1970
Baseball Ground* Derby 2 1899 1901
Elm Park* Reading 1 1900 1900
Villa Park Birmingham 55 1901 2007
City Ground West Bridgford 5 1901 1965
The Hawthorns West Bromwich 2 1902 1960
White Hart Lane* London 12 1902 1988
Hyde Road* Manchester 1 1905 1905
St Andrew's Birmingham 9 1907 1961
Stamford Bridge London 10 1910 1978
Elland Road Leeds 10 1910 1995
Old Trafford Manchester 23 1910 2007
Meadow Lane Nottingham 2 1912 1925
Hillsborough Sheffield 34 1912 1997
Turf Moor Burnley 1 1922 1922
Filbert Street* Leicester 2 1928 1962
Maine Road* Manchester 18 1928 1994
Highbury* London 12[15] 1929 1997
Leeds Road* Huddersfield 6 1932 1951
Roker Park* Sunderland 1 1955 1955
Highfield Road* Coventry 1 1980 1980
Old Wembley* London 7 1991 2000
Millennium Stadium Cardiff, Wales[note 14] 2 2005 2005
New Wembley London 20 2008 2018

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Queen's Park could not afford a second trip to London for their semi-final replay and were forced to withdraw.
  2. ^ Queen's Park once again withdrew from the FA Cup at the semi-final stage.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Non-League club
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw Club in second flight of league system
  5. ^ Match abandoned at half time due to a crush in the crowd and dark conditions.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i Club in third flight of league system
  7. ^ Abandoned after 6 minutes (see Hillsborough Disaster).
  8. ^ 3–1 on penalties
  9. ^ 4–1 on penalties
  10. ^ a b 4–2 on penalties
  11. ^ a b Welsh team
  12. ^ a b Scottish team that was invited to compete
  13. ^ Venue in nation other than England or Wales
  14. ^ Venue in Wales

References

  1. ^ http://www.rsssf.com/tablese/engcup1882.html
  2. ^ https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/0/happened-hillsborough-1989/
  3. ^ https://www.bbc.com/sport/football/17672088
  4. ^ "New Wembley to host semis". BBC News. 3 January 2003. Retrieved 25 February 2011.
  5. ^ "Football Supporters Hail FA Cup Semi-final Decision" (Press release). Football Supporters Federation. 18 November 2005. Archived from the original on 8 February 2007. Retrieved 25 February 2011.
  6. ^ "Moyes unhappy with Wembley semi". BBC News. 9 March 2009. Retrieved 25 February 2011.
  7. ^ https://www.birminghammail.co.uk/sport/football/football-news/aston-villa-chief-want-fa-14583932
  8. ^ http://www.nydailynews.com/newswires/sports/spurs-beat-swansea-home-fa-cup-semifinal-wembley-article-1.3880350
  9. ^ http://www.espn.com/soccer/tottenham-hotspur/story/3390091/no-wembley-privileges-for-tottenham-if-they-reach-fa-cup-semifinals-report?src=com
  10. ^ http://www.rsssf.com/tablese/engcup1873.html
  11. ^ https://news.arseblog.com/2015/04/f-a-cup-semi-final-facts-stats-and-trivia
  12. ^ https://sports.yahoo.com/news/fa-cup-quarter-finals-why-162042008.html
  13. ^ http://www.thefa.com/news/2014/Apr/12/the-fa-cup-stats-and-figures-2013-14
  14. ^ Hughes, Rob (6 April 2008). "Nwanko Kanu repays Harry Redknapp's faith in one moment". London: TimesOnline. Retrieved 10 May 2008.
  15. ^ https://www.arsenal.com/news/news-archive/fa-cup-semi-finals
1919–20 Chelsea F.C. season

The 1919–20 season was Chelsea Football Club's 11th of competitive football. It was also the first full English football season since the end of World War I. It proved to be Chelsea's most successful season to that point, as they finished 3rd in the First Division and reached the FA Cup semi-finals.

1946–47 Liverpool F.C. season

The 1946–47 season was the 55th season in Liverpool F.C.'s existence, and ended their season as Champions, winning the title by one point from Manchester United and Wolverhampton Wanderers.

The chances of them doing the double was over by being beaten in the FA Cup Semi-Finals by 2nd Division Burnley.

Albert Mullard

Albert Thomas Mullard (22 November 1920 – 27 May 1984) was an English footballer who played at right-half and inside forward.

After spending most of World War II in a Prisoner-of-war camp he turned to professional football. He plied his trade in the Midlands with Walsall, Crewe Alexandra, and Stoke City, though his most successful time was with Port Vale, with whom he won the Third Division North title and reached the FA Cup semi-finals in 1953–54. He also turned out for non-league sides Hinckley United and Northwich Victoria.

Arsenal Stadium

Arsenal Stadium was a football stadium in Highbury, North London, which was the home of Arsenal Football Club between 6 September 1913 and 7 May 2006. It was popularly known as "Highbury" due to its location and was given the affectionate nickname of the "Home of Football" by the club.It was originally built in 1913 on the site of a local college's recreation ground and was significantly redeveloped twice. The first reconstruction came in the 1930s from which the Art Deco East and West Stands date. There was a second development; the first phase was completed in 1989 which added executive boxes to the Clock End, and afterwards in 1993 a new North Bank Stand was constructed, both following the recommendations of the Taylor Report which replaced the terraces to make the stadium an all-seater with four stands. However, further attempts to expand the stadium were blocked by the community, and the resulting reduction in capacity and matchday revenue eventually led to Arsenal opting to build a new stadium, to become known as the Emirates Stadium in nearby Islington. After the club moved to their new stadium upon the conclusion of the 2005–2006 season, Highbury was redeveloped as a residential development known as Highbury Square, with the Clock End and North Bank stands being demolished; parts of the East and West Stands remained and were incorporated into the new development due to their listed status.

The stadium also hosted international matches – both for England and in the 1948 Summer Olympics – and FA Cup semi-finals, as well as boxing, baseball and cricket matches. Its presence also led to the local London Underground station being renamed to Arsenal in 1932, making it the only station on the Underground network to be named after a football club.

In addition to its architecture, the stadium was known for its small but immaculate pitch and for the clock which had been positioned in the southern side of the ground since its introduction in 1930.

Bill Rawlings

William Ernest Rawlings (3 January 1896 – 25 September 1972) was an English footballer. A centre-forward, he scored more than 196 goals in 367 league games in a 15-year career.

He began his career with Southampton in 1918, who were elevated from the Southern League to the Football League in 1919. He finished as the club's top-scorer eight times in nine seasons from 1920–21 to 1927–28, helping the "Saints" to win the Third Division South title in 1921–22 and to reach the FA Cup semi-finals in 1925 and 1927. He also won himself two England caps in 1922, both of which were from British Home Championship games. He signed with Manchester United in March 1928, and moved on to Port Vale in November 1929. He picked up a serious ankle injury whilst with the "Valiants", and moved onto Newport via New Milton the following year, before retiring in 1933.

Harry Betmead

Harry Betmead (11 April 1912 – 26 August 1984) was an English footballer who played for Grimsby Town, as well as the English national side. He also played cricket for Lincolnshire. He spent his entire 17-year career with Grimsby, from 1930 to 1947, and is one of only three players to win an England cap whilst at the club (the other two being teammates Jackie Bestall and George Tweedy). He helped the club to win the Second Division title in 1933–34 and to reach two FA Cup semi-finals. After retiring from the game he went into business in Hertfordshire.

Harry Kingscott

Arthur Henry "Harry" Kingscott (2 March 1890 – 17 November 1956) was the referee of the 1931 FA Cup Final and son of Arthur Kingscott, twice a Cup Final referee himself and FA Treasurer at the time of his son's appointment.

Harry Kingscott was an international referee taking charge of the Wales v Scotland Home International played at Wrexham in 1927 as well as the return fixture the following year in Glasgow.He was on the Football League list from 1921 until 1933.

From "The Football Who's Who" edited by Frank Johnston (1935):

A. H. Kingscott needs no introduction to Derbyshire football fans. In fact, he needs no introduction to football followers in any part of the British Isles, for on April 25, 1931, Mr Kingscott was in charge of the FA Cup Final at Wembley. Thus, in realising the ambition which every referee must cherish,Mr Kingscott created a remarkable record - he had followed right in his father's footsteps as a Cup Final referee. Mr A. G. Kingscott had held the reins in 1900 and 1901. "AH", a Long Eaton man, born and bred, was a keen footballer himself, and played for 15 years, mainly with Sawley United and the 7th Hussars (in India) before embarking on his career as referee. In 1920, he was placed on the linesmen's list of the Football League and acted as linesman at the FA Cup Final of 1925. His big chance came when he was acting as linesman in the match, Sheffield Wednesday v. Bristol City. Just before half-time the referee became too ill to continue. Mr. Kingscott stepped into the breach and conducted the game in such fine style that shortly afterwards his name appeared on the referees' list. Apart from the Cup Final of 1931, the following games stand out among the high spots of his brilliant career: two FA Cup semi-finals; Holland v. Uruguay; Spain v. Italy; France v. Spain; Belgium v. Holland (twice) and the Amateur Cup Final of 1923.

John Ritchie (footballer, born 1941)

John Henry Ritchie (12 July 1941 – 23 February 2007) was an English footballer. He is Stoke City's all-time record goalscorer.

Ritchie began his career with his hometown club Kettering Town before joining Stoke City in 1962. In his first full season as a professional Ritchie scored an impressive 30 goals and hit 81 goals in 135 appearances. He was surprisingly sold by Tony Waddington to Sheffield Wednesday in November 1966 for £80,000. After scored 45 goals for Wednesday in three seasons Waddington decided that selling Ritchie was a mistake and re-signed him for £28,000. He continued to be a prolific goalscorer for Stoke City and helped then win their first major trophy, the 1972 Football League Cup and reach two FA Cup semi finals. He remained at Stoke until September 1974 when a broken leg ended his career. He had scored 176 goals for Stoke in 347 matches making him Stoke's record goalscorer.

Maine Road

Maine Road was a football stadium in Moss Side, Manchester, England, that was home to Manchester City F.C. from 1923 to 2003. It hosted FA Cup semi-finals, Charity Shield matches, a League Cup final and England matches and, because of its high capacity, gained the nickname Wembley of the North. Maine Road holds the record for the highest attendance for a club in their normal home stadium in English club football, set in 1934 at an FA Cup sixth round match between Manchester City and Stoke City.

By Manchester City's last season at Maine Road in 2002–03, it was an all-seater stadium with a capacity of 35,150 and of haphazard design with stands of varying heights due to the ground being renovated several times over its 80-year history. The following season Manchester City moved to the City of Manchester Stadium in East Manchester, a mile from the city centre and near Ardwick where the club originally formed in 1880.

Mark Smith (footballer, born 1960)

Mark Craig Smith (born 21 March 1960) is an English former professional footballer who is now a youth team coach at Chesterfield.

An England under-21 international, he posted 510 league appearances in a seventeen-year career in the Football League. He spent the first ten years of his career at Sheffield Wednesday, and by the time he left for Plymouth Argyle in 1987 he had made 282 league appearances for Wednesday. During his time in Sheffield he was named as the club's Player of the Year in 1981 and Wednesday twice won promotion and twice appeared in the FA Cup semi-finals. He switched to Barnsley in 1990 and was named as the club's Player of the Year in 1992. He signed with Notts County in 1992. He was loaned out to Port Vale, Huddersfield Town and Chesterfield, before he finished his career at Lincoln City in 1994. He then began work as a coach at various clubs, which included a one-game stint in charge of Sheffield Wednesday in 2004, in a caretaker manager capacity. He then returned to coaching, and also worked as caretaker-manager of Chesterfield in November 2015.

Matěj Helebrand

Matěj Helebrand (born 19 June 1997) is a professional Czech football defender currently playing for SFC Opava in the Czech National Football League.

He made his senior league debut for Opava on 21 August 2016 in a Czech National Football League 3–3 draw at Viktoria Žižkov. On 26 April 2017, he scored the winning goal in Opava's 2–0 win at Mladá Boleslav in the Czech FA Cup semi-finals, helping his Second League team to defeat their fourth First League opponents in a row and advance to the FA Cup final for the first time in club history.

Percy Sands

Percy Robert Sands (1881 – December 1965) was an English footballer, who spent seventeen years playing for Arsenal, making him one of the club's most enduring servants.

Born in Norwood, London, Sands trained as a teacher in Cheltenham and also turned out for Cheltenham Town while in the town. He joined Woolwich Arsenal (as they were then known) as an amateur in 1902. While still an amateur, he became the club's first-choice centre half in 1903-04, having made his debut against Blackpool on 5 September 1903. He would not turn fully professional for another three years, and would still work as a teacher when not playing.

Woolwich Arsenal were promoted to the First Division in 1904, and Sands was a near ever-present in the side. Although Arsenal were an undistinguished mid-table side at this time, they reached the FA Cup semi-finals two years running, in 1905-06 and 1906-07. Nicknamed "Mr Reliable", Sands stuck with the club through leaner times, including financial difficulties and then relegation in 1912-13, by which time he had been made captain of the side, and the club's move to Highbury (and its subsequent renaming) that same year.

With the advent of World War I, first-class football was suspended, but despite his age (33), Sands continued to play for Arsenal in unofficial wartime matches. He later left to serve in the Royal Army Medical Corps on the Western Front. After peace broke out, he joined Southern League side Southend United, before retiring. In all he played 350 matches for the Gunners, a record that stood until it was broken by Bob John fifteen years later.

He was never capped for England, although he was called up for trials with the squad, and also played for the Football League representative team. He died in December 1965 aged 84.

Phil Kelso

Phil Wade Kelso (26 May 1871 – 13 February 1935), born in Largs on the Firth of Clyde, Scotland, was a Scottish football manager.Kelso was manager of Hibernian for one season, before taking over as manager of newly promoted Woolwich Arsenal in 1904. He managed the club for four years, during which time he took the side to the FA Cup semi-finals two seasons in a row; however, his best in the league was seventh (in 1906-07).With the club starting to run into financial trouble and with results declining, Kelso resigned in 1908 to return to Scotland to manage a hotel; but was tempted back down south to become manager of Fulham in 1909. He stayed with the Cottagers for 15 years, making him their longest-serving manager. After retiring from football he ran a couple of pubs in the Hammersmith area and was chairman of the Football League Managers and Secretaries Association.Kelso died in London, in 1935, aged 63. He is buried in East Sheen

Reg Potts

Reginald Potts (31 July 1927 – 28 January 1996) was an English football defender, nicknamed "Dan" after Desperate Dan.

A key member of Port Vale's history, he played 301 competitive games for the club between 1945 and 1957. He helped the "Valiants" to win the Third Division North title and to reach the FA Cup semi-finals in 1953–54. He later turned out for non-league sides Worcester City and Macclesfield Town.

Roger Palmer (footballer)

Roger Palmer (born 30 January 1959) is a former footballer. He played for Manchester City and Oldham Athletic. He is the all-time leading goal-scorer at Oldham.

Roger was an undemonstrative player, and a quiet and modest man off the field.

Roger's career culminated in a superb run of success for Oldham, including appearances in the 1990 Football League Cup Final at Wembley and FA Cup semi-finals. In his testimonial season (1990–91), Oldham won the Second Division championship and rejoined the top flight of English football.

Since his retirement from football, he has been reclusive but he is remembered with fondness in Oldham.

The Latics fans demonstrate their reverence for Roger in their chant "Ooooh, Roger Palmer, oooooh, Roger Palmer,".

In January 2008, the BBC Sport website put out an appeal for information on Palmer's whereabouts, ahead of the Oldham v Everton FA Cup Third Round tie. The teams last played in a cup tie in 1990, with Palmer the only player whose whereabouts were unknown. Both the media and Oldham Athletic attempted several times to contact Palmer without success. 'Where is Roger Palmer?' went round Boundary Park several times.

Finally, on 8 May 2010 on the final day of the season against Charlton Athletic, Palmer made an appearance on the Boundary Park pitch at half time to rapturous applause and chants of "OOOHH ROGER PALMER!".

Roger has been living on the Racecourse Estate in Sale, Greater Manchester, since retirement. He played the odd game for local community centre and a couple of Sunday games for local pubs.

Stan Turner

Stanley Simpson Turner (21 October 1926 – 28 April 1991) was an English footballer. A tough-tackling defender, he made 246 appearances (227 in the league, 18 in the FA Cup and 1 in the Coronation Cup) for Port Vale during one of the club's brightest periods. He helped the "Valiants" to win the Third Division North title and to reach the FA Cup semi-finals in 1953–54.

Steven Gaughan

Steven Edward Gaughan (born 14 April 1970 in Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England) was an English footballer who played as a midfielder for various clubs in The Football League. Whilst at Chesterfield he featured in their memorable run to the 1997 FA Cup semi finals, coming on as a substitute in their quarter final victory over Wrexham. However, he didn't play in the semi final itself, as Chesterfield ultimately lost to Middlesbrough after a replay.

Tommy Cheadle

Thomas Cheadle (8 April 1919 – 4 September 1993) was an English footballer. He played for Port Vale in various positions for over a decade. It was his time as a "hard-man" centre-back, captaining some of the most successful Vale sides in the club's history, that made Cheadle a legend at the club. He helped the "Valiants" to win the Third Division North title and to reach the FA Cup semi-finals in 1953–54. He ended his career in 1959, following two years with Crewe Alexandra.

Tony Waddington

Anthony "Tony" Waddington (9 November 1924 – 21 January 1994) was an English football manager at both Crewe Alexandra and Stoke City.Waddington had a seven-year playing career with Crewe Alexandra before becoming a coach at Stoke City. He progressed to assistant manager to Frank Taylor and took his position in June 1960. He set about staving off the threat of relegation before bringing back club legend Stanley Matthews in an effort to rekindle the club's supporter base. It worked well and he had enough money to bring in a number of established veterans as Stoke took the Football League Second Division title in 1962–63 and reached the 1964 Football League Cup Final, losing out to Leicester City.

More fine signings followed as Stoke enjoyed great success at the beginning of the 1970s reaching two FA Cup semi-finals, playing in the UEFA Cup twice and winning their first major trophy, the Football League Cup in 1972. Stoke then nearly won the First Division in 1974–75 but after the Butler Street Stand roof fell off in a strong storm at the Victoria Ground Stoke had to sell their best players to cover the repair costs and a despondent Waddington quit in March 1977 with Stoke heading for relegation. He later had a two-year spell at Crewe Alexandra before becoming associate director of Stoke in 1991 until his death in 1994.

Seasons
Qualifying rounds
Finals

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