Ezekiel Elliott

Ezekiel Elijah Elliott (born July 22, 1995) is an American football running back for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Ohio State, where he earned second-team All-America honors in 2015. He was drafted by the Cowboys fourth overall in the 2016 NFL Draft. In his first NFL season, he led the league in rushing yards and was invited to the Pro Bowl.

Ezekiel Elliott
refer to caption
Elliott with the Dallas Cowboys in 2017
No. 21 – Dallas Cowboys
Position:Running back
Personal information
Born:July 22, 1995 (age 23)
Alton, Illinois
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:228 lb (103 kg)
Career information
High school:John Burroughs School
(Ladue, Missouri)
College:Ohio State
NFL Draft:2016 / Round: 1 / Pick: 4
Career history
Roster status:Active
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of Week 16, 2018
Rushing yards:4,048
Yards per carry:4.7
Rushing touchdowns:28
Receptions:135
Receiving yards:1,199
Receiving touchdowns:6
Player stats at NFL.com

Early life

Elliott was born in Alton, Illinois, to a mother and father whom were both athletes in college.[1] His mother, the former Dawn Huff, was a high school state champion in three sports before attending the University of Missouri and running track there.[2][3] His father, Stacy, was a linebacker for the Missouri football team and CEO of Fifth Down Enterprises.[4] Elliott's maternal grandfather played basketball for Drake University.[2]

High school career

Despite his athletic pedigree, Elliott attended more academically driven John Burroughs School in Ladue, Missouri,[5][6] where he was a three-sport star in football, basketball, and track, and also played baseball.[6] He played as a running back for the John Burroughs Bombers football team. As a junior in 2012, he was named the St. Louis Post-Dispatch offensive player of the year after rushing for 1,802 yards and 34 touchdowns and receiving 23 passes for 401 yards and six scores. In his senior year, he had 3,061 all-purpose yards and 50 total touchdowns, including 2,155 rushing yards and 40 rushing touchdowns.[7] He led the football team to three straight championship games, but lost all three.[6]

Also a standout track and field athlete, Elliott was a state qualifier in sprinting and hurdling events. He capped his high school career by winning four state championships at the Missouri Class 3 state championships in ​2 12 hours (100-meter dash, 200-meter dash, 110-meter high hurdles and 300-meter hurdles).[8] He recorded career-best times of 10.95 seconds in the 100-meter dash, 22.05 seconds in the 200-meter dash, 13.77 seconds in the 110m hurdles and 37.52 seconds in the 300m hurdles. He was named the Gatorade Track Athlete of the Year in the state of Missouri.[9]

Considered a four-star recruit by Scout.com, Elliott was listed as the No. 9 running back in the nation in 2013.[10] He played in the 2013 U.S. Army All-American Bowl. Despite overwhelming support and pressure for Elliott to sign with his parents' alma mater, the University of Missouri, he decided to sign with Ohio State University.[6]

College career

As a true freshman at Ohio State University in 2013, Elliott rushed for 262 yards on 30 carries with two touchdowns as a backup to starter Carlos Hyde, mostly playing as a gunner on special teams.[6][11][12]

Ezekiel Elliott interview picture
Elliott in 2014

In 2014, with the departure of Hyde to the NFL, Elliott took over as the starter for the Buckeyes.[13][14] During the season, Elliott was named to the Academic All-Big Ten Conference team.[15] Elliott rushed over 100 yards six times during the scheduled season.[16] In the 2014 Big Ten Championship Game against the Wisconsin Badgers, Elliott ran for 220 yards on 20 carries for two touchdowns. This win qualified Ohio State for the first-ever College Football Playoff. In the 2015 Sugar Bowl against #1 Alabama, Elliott ran for 230 yards on 20 carries in a hard-fought 42–35 win where he was named the Offensive Player of the Game.[17] He then capped the Buckeyes' championship season by rushing for 246 yards on 36 carries and scoring four touchdowns against the Oregon Ducks.[18][19] He was named the Offensive MVP of that game as well; it was the third most rushing yards ever by an Ohio State player.[20]

In 2015, Elliott began the season by rushing for over 100 yards in 10 straight wins, including 274 against Indiana on October 3 (the second most all-time by an Ohio State player).[21][20] However, the team suffered a 14–17 loss to Michigan State on November 21, 2015, and Elliott announced that he would enter the 2016 NFL Draft.[22][23] The following week, Elliott ran for 214 yards on 30 carries in a 42–13 Ohio State victory over rival Michigan in Ann Arbor, his fifth 200+ yard game.[24] He ended his collegiate career with 149 yards and four touchdowns in a Fiesta Bowl win over Notre Dame.[25]

Elliott finished his career at Ohio State on several leaderboards.[26] He was second in career rushing yards with 3,961 and yards per game with 101.6 (both behind only Archie Griffin), had the second and third most rushing yards in a season, and five of the top 20 rushing yards in a game. His 43 rushing touchdowns was fourth most all time, and his 23 in 2015 was third most in a season. His twelve 100-yard rushing games in the 2015 season tied Eddie George for a school record, and the 22 he amassed over his career was again second only to Griffin (as was his streak of 15 consecutive 100-yard games from 2014–2015). He and George are the only Ohio State players with five 200-yard rushing games.[20]

Individual awards

Elliott received numerous honors during his tenure at Ohio State. In the 2014 season, Elliott was named the Offensive MVP of both the 2015 Sugar Bowl and the 2015 College Football Playoff National Championship Game.

Elliott's success at the end of the 2014 season made him a front-runner for the 2015 Heisman Trophy, though he in fact finished 8th in the voting.[27][28] After a successful regular season in which he gained 1,672 yards and 19 touchdowns, Elliott was named the 2015 Graham-George Offensive Player of the Year, 2015 Ameche-Dayne Running Back of the Year and was selected as Unanimous First Team All-Big Ten. In addition to the yearly awards, he was also named Big Ten Player of the Week twice during the 2015 season for his performances in Week 5 against Indiana, and in Week 13 against Michigan.[29]

Statistics

Collegiate career statistics
Season Rushing Receiving
Att Yards Avg Long TD Rec Yards Avg Long TD
2013 30 262 8.7 57 2 3 23 7.7 11 1
2014 273 1,878 6.9 85 18 28 220 7.9 22 0
2015 289 1,821 6.3 80 23 27 206 7.6 30 0
NCAA Total 592 3,961 6.7 85 43 58 449 7.7 30 1

Professional career

Before the draft, Elliott was labeled the most complete back to enter the NFL since Adrian Peterson in 2007, and was predicted to be a top 10 selection.[30][31][32][33][34] On a draft breakdown by NFL.com, he drew comparisons to Edgerrin James and was listed as a three-down back that had "rare combination of size, athleticism, pass-catching and blocking skills", and that he "should still come out of the gates as one of the most productive young running backs in the league".[35]

Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt Arm length Hand size 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad
5 ft 11 34 in
(1.82 m)
225 lb
(102 kg)
31 14 in
(0.79 m)
10 14 in
(0.26 m)
4.47 s 1.58 s 2.62 s 32 12 in
(0.83 m)
9 ft 10 in
(3.00 m)
All values from NFL Combine.[36][37]

Elliott was selected in the first round with the fourth overall pick by the Dallas Cowboys in the 2016 NFL Draft on April 28, 2016.[38] He was the first running back selected in the draft that year.[39] He was widely regarded as an early favorite for the 2016 Offensive Rookie of the Year while playing behind what many agreed upon as the NFL's most dominant offensive line leading up to the 2016 NFL season.[40][41][42][43]

On May 18, 2016, Elliott signed his four-year rookie contract reportedly worth $24.9 million with a $16.3 million signing bonus.[44]

2016 season

Ezekiel Elliott vs. the Redskins in 2016
Elliott playing against the Washington Redskins in 2016

Elliott was named the Dallas Cowboys' starting running back going into the regular season, ahead of veterans Alfred Morris and Darren McFadden. In his professional debut, he had 20 rushing attempts for 51 rushing yards and scored his first career touchdown on an eight-yard run against the New York Giants.[45] The following game against the Washington Redskins, Elliott had 21 carries for 83 yards and a touchdown but also fumbled twice, losing one of them.[46] In a Week 3 matchup against the Chicago Bears, he posted his first game with over a hundred yards and finished Dallas' second consecutive victory with 30 rushing attempts for 140 rushing yards.[47] In the next game, against the San Francisco 49ers, he had 138 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown.[48] On October 9, 2016, Elliott helped his team defeat the Cincinnati Bengals 28–14 and rushed for 134 yards on 15 attempts and scored two rushing touchdowns, including a 60-yard touchdown.[49] The next week, the Cowboys played the Green Bay Packers, and Elliott continued his four-game streak with over 100 yards after carrying the ball 28 times for 157 rushing yards.[50][51]

After the ninth game of the 2016 season, he became the second Cowboys rookie to rush for more than 1,000 yards in a season, after Tony Dorsett achieved the mark in 1977. As well, he became the third running back to rush for 1,000 yards after just the ninth game of his career, joining Adrian Peterson and Eric Dickerson.[52]

In a November 13 victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers, Elliott recorded 209 total yards and three touchdowns, including his first career receiving touchdown on an 83-yard pass from fellow rookie Dak Prescott, and a 32-yard run for the game-winning touchdown with 9 seconds left.[50] In Week 11, Elliott rushed for 97 yards against the Baltimore Ravens, passing Tony Dorsett's Cowboys rookie rushing record on his second carry.[53]

In Week 15, after scoring a touchdown against Tampa Bay, Elliott jumped into an oversized Salvation Army Red Kettle; an unusual touchdown celebration.[54][55] With that rushing touchdown, he surpassed Tony Dorsett and Herschel Walker for the Cowboys rookie record.[56] He ran for 159 yards in the game.[57] Since the Cowboys clinched the number one seed and home field advantage throughout the playoffs, Elliott rushed for only 80 yards in Week 16 and did not play in Week 17.[58][59] He finished the season as the NFL's top rusher with 1,631 yards[60] and third with 15 touchdowns.[61] Elliott's 464 yards after contact ranked fourth among NFL running backs.[62] As a result of his successful 2016 season, Elliott was selected as a First-team All-Pro,[63] and earned his first Pro Bowl, joining Dak Prescott as the first rookie running back and quarterback duo in NFL history to be selected.[64] He was also ranked seventh by his peers on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2017 as the highest ranked running back.[65]

In his first career playoff game, he ran 22 times for 125 yards in a loss to the Green Bay Packers in the Divisional Round, joining Duane Thomas as the only Cowboy rookie to rush for over 100 yards in a playoff game.[66]

2017 season

Ezekiel Elliott (38027138731)
Elliott against the Redskins in 2017

On August 11, 2017, the NFL suspended Elliott for the first six games of the 2017 season for violating the personal conduct policy. His suspension stemmed from accusations of domestic violence against his ex-girlfriend on five occasions in 2016. NFL officials conducted a year-long investigation into the allegations, and though Elliott was never criminally charged, decided to suspend him.[67] On August 16, Elliott announced that he would appeal the suspension.[68][69] Although the suspension was upheld on September 6 by a league-appointed arbitrator, on September 8, a federal judge granted a request for injunction by the NFL Players Association (NFLPA), putting the suspension on hold indefinitely.[70]

On September 10, 2017, in Week 1 against the New York Giants on NBC Sunday Night Football, Elliott rushed for 104 yards on 24 attempts as the Cowboys won by a score of 19–3.[71][72]

On September 17, 2017, in Week 2, Elliott had the worst game of his career statistically in an away game against the Denver Broncos. He was held to eight rushing yards on nine carries in the 42–17 defeat.[73]

On October 12, the Fifth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals announced that Elliot's suspension had been reinstated, meaning that he would have to serve the six-game suspension up from that point.[74][75] On October 18, Elliott was granted a temporary restraining order, meaning that he would not have to serve his suspension from that point, allowing him to play in Week 7.[76] In Week 7, against the San Francisco 49ers, Elliott rushed for 147 yards and two touchdowns and had a 72-yard touchdown reception from Dak Prescott in the 40–10 victory.[77]

On October 30, Judge Katherine Polk Failla of the New York Southern District Court, denied Elliott's request for a preliminary injunction, which reinstated the 6-game suspension.[78] The following day, the NFLPA filed an emergency motion for the injunction.[79]

On November 3, Elliott was once again granted a stay by the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, which delayed the suspension.[80]

On November 9, the suspension was once again reinstated by the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.[81] Three days afterward, Elliott decided to accept the suspension and leave the country to train for a little while.[82] On November 15, Elliott officially announced that he withdrew from another appeal attempt.[83] During his suspension, he had been training and rehabbing his hamstrings in Mexico before his reinstatement.[84] Elliott returned in Week 16 during a must-win situation against the Seattle Seahawks, where he rushed for 97 yards. The Cowboys lost 12–21 and were eliminated from playoff contention.[85][86] In the regular season finale against the Philadelphia Eagles, Elliott recorded 27 carries for 103 rushing yards in the 6–0 victory.[87] Overall, in the 2017 season, he finished with 983 rushing yards, seven rushing touchdowns, 269 receiving yards, and two receiving touchdowns.[88] He was ranked 54th by his peers on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2018.[89]

2018 season

In the first two games of his third professional season, Elliott recorded a rushing touchdown in both games against the Carolina Panthers and New York Giants.[90][91] In Week 3, in a loss to the Seattle Seahawks, he recorded 127 rushing yards.[92] In the following game, against the Detroit Lions, he had 152 rushing yards and four receptions for 88 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown in the victory.[93] On October 14, 2018, Elliot ran for 106 yards and a touchdown against the Jacksonville Jaguars. With his only score, he became the 12th Cowboy to reach 25 touchdowns on the ground as well as the fastest to do so, three games faster than Emmitt Smith.[94] On November 11, Elliot scored twice, racking up 151 rushing yards and 36 receiving yards against the reigning Super Bowl champions, the Philadelphia Eagles.[95] He broke 150 yards rushing for the fifth time in his career, surpassing DeMarco Murray for third-most in franchise history.[96] The following week, he recorded 201 scrimmage yards and a touchdown against the Atlanta Falcons, his fourth game over 200, tying with DeMarco Murray and Emmitt Smith for most in franchise history.[97] He continued his success, with 121 yards and a score on the run against the Washington Redskins on Thanksgiving, eclipsing 1,000 yards on the year, the second time of his career, tied for third (along with DeMarco Murray & Calvin Hill) most in Cowboys' history.[98][99] In Week 13, in a narrow 13–10 victory over the New Orleans Saints on Thursday Night Football, he recorded 136 scrimmage yards and a receiving touchdown.[100] Overall, he finished the 2018 season with 1,434 rushing yards, six rushing touchdowns, 77 receptions, 567 receiving yards, and three receiving touchdowns.[101] He won the rushing title for the second time in three seasons.[102] The Cowboys won the NFC East and made the playoffs as the #4-seed for the NFC Playoffs. In the 2019 NFC Wild Card Round against the Seattle Seahawks, Elliott rushed 26 times for 137 yards and a touchdown in the 24–22 victory.[103] In the Divisional Round against the Los Angeles Rams, he had 20 carries for 47 yards and a touchdown in the 30–22 loss.[104]

2019 season

On April 17, 2019, the Cowboys picked up the fifth-year option on Elliott's contract.[105]

NFL career statistics

Year Team Games Rushing Receiving
GP GS Att Yards Avg Lng TD Yds/g Att/g Rec Yds Avg Lng TD Rec/g Yds/g
2016 DAL 15 15 322 1,631 5.1 60 15 108.7 21.5 32 363 11.3 83T 1 2.1 24.2
2017 DAL 10 10 242 983 4.1 30 7 98.3 24.2 26 269 10.3 72 2 2.6 26.9
2018 DAL 15 15 304 1,434 4.7 41 6 95.6 20.3 77 567 7.4 38 3 5.1 37.8
Career 40 40 868 4,048 4.7 60 28 101.2 21.7 135 1,199 8.9 83T 6 3.4 30.0
    • GP: games played
    • GS: games started
    • Att: rushing attempts
    • Avg (rushing): yards per attempt
    • Yds/G (rushing): yards per game
    • Att/G: rushing attempts per game
    • Rec: receptions
    • Avg (receiving): yards per reception
    • Rec/G: receptions per game
    • Yds/G (receiving): receiving yards per game

Awards

  • FedEx Ground Player of the Year (2016)
  • Offensive Rookie of the Month – October 2016[106]
  • Pepsi NFL Rookie of the Week[107]
  • NFC Offensive Player of the Week – Week 10, 2016[108]
  • NFL Castrol Edge Clutch Performer of the Week – Week 10, 2016[109]
  • 2× NFL FedEx Ground Running Back of the Week – Weeks 4 and 5, 2016

Personal life

Elliott bought his parents Dawn and Stacy Elliott a new house after signing his rookie contracts. He studied marketing at Ohio State University. He was good friends with fellow Buckeye teammate Kosta Karageorge, who was a walk-on defensive end. Karageorge received national attention when he committed suicide by a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. Elliott was very surprised by the death of his friend. "Our hearts dropped," he told ESPN. "It was just a hard moment for all of us. For me, personally, that was my first time losing someone that I was very close with."[110]

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External links

2014 Ohio State Buckeyes football team

The 2014 Ohio State Buckeyes football team represented The Ohio State University in the 2014 NCAA Division I FBS football season. It was the Buckeyes' 125th overall, the 102nd as a member of the Big Ten Conference, and first season as a member of the newly reorganized Eastern Division. The team was led by Urban Meyer, in his third year as head coach, and played their home games at Ohio Stadium in Columbus, Ohio. They finished the season with 14 wins and 1 loss (14–1 overall, 8–0 in the Big Ten), as Big Ten champions and as national champions after they defeated Oregon in the inaugural College Football Playoff National Championship Game. Winning 14 games in a season tied the school record set by the Buckeyes' previous national champion team.

After a 12–2 season the previous year, Ohio State signed a highly ranked recruiting class and entered the season ranked No. 5 in the AP poll and No. 6 in the coaches' preseason poll. In the second game of the season, Ohio State was upset by Virginia Tech, 35–21. Following the loss, Ohio State won five consecutive games, including four against Big Ten opponents. In the ninth game of the season, Ohio State defeated Michigan State in a rematch of the previous year's Big Ten Championship Game. After the 49–37 win over the Spartans, the Buckeyes moved into the top ten in all major polls. After a 42–28 win over bitter rival Michigan, Ohio State completed their third consecutive undefeated Big Ten regular season, and earned their second consecutive berth in the Big Ten Championship Game, where they defeated Wisconsin 59–0. In the first season of the College Football Playoff, Ohio State was selected as the No. 4 team, where they defeated Alabama in the Sugar Bowl 42–35. The win advanced the Buckeyes to the 2015 College Football Playoff National Championship Game, where they defeated Oregon 42–20 to capture the 2014 national championship. They were voted consensus national champions as the Associated Press and the Coaches Poll both named them the number one team in their final polls.

2015 College Football Playoff National Championship

The 2015 College Football Playoff National Championship was a bowl game that determined a national champion of NCAA Division I FBS college football for the 2014 season, which took place at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas on January 12, 2015. It was the culminating game of the 2014–15 bowl season as the inaugural College Football Playoff National Championship, replacing the BCS National Championship Game. The national title was contested through a four-team bracket system, the College Football Playoff, which replaced the previous Bowl Championship Series.The game was played between the winners of two designated semi-final bowl games played on January 1, 2015: the No. 4 Ohio State Buckeyes, who upset No. 1 Alabama 42–35 in the 2015 Sugar Bowl, and the No. 2 Oregon Ducks, who defeated previously unbeaten No. 3 Florida State 59–20 in the 2015 Rose Bowl. This was the first championship game since 2006 that did not feature at least one SEC team, and the teams' first meeting since the 2010 Rose Bowl, which the Buckeyes won 26–17.

The Ohio State Buckeyes won the game, 42–20, marking the first national championship awarded under the CFP system. Following the game, the AP Poll and Coaches' Poll also named Ohio State as their top team of the season, marking Ohio State's first national championship since 2002 and their 8th overall.

2015 Ohio State Buckeyes football team

The 2015 Ohio State Buckeyes football team represented The Ohio State University in the 2015 NCAA Division I FBS football season. It was the Buckeyes' 126th season overall, the 103rd as a member of the Big Ten Conference, and second as a member of the Eastern Division. The team was led by Urban Meyer, in his fourth year as head coach, and played its home games at Ohio Stadium in Columbus, Ohio. They finished the season 12–1, 7–1 in Big Ten play, to finish in a tie for the East Division championship with Michigan State. Due to their head-to-head loss to Michigan State, they did not represent the East Division in the Big Ten Championship Game. They were invited to the Fiesta Bowl where they defeated Notre Dame.

2015 Sugar Bowl

The 2015 Sugar Bowl was a college football game that was played on January 1, 2015 at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. It was the 81st Sugar Bowl, and a semifinal game in the College Football Playoff. It was one of the 2014–15 bowl games that concluded the 2014 FBS football season. Sponsored by the Allstate insurance company, the game was officially known as the College Football Playoff Semifinal at the Allstate Sugar Bowl.

In the game, the fourth-ranked Ohio State Buckeyes defeated the top-ranked Alabama Crimson Tide by a score of 42–35. The Buckeyes advanced to the College Football Playoff Championship Game against the Oregon Ducks, which was played January 12 at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas.

The contest was televised on ESPN and ESPN Deportes, with a radio broadcast on ESPN Radio and XM Satellite Radio. Kickoff time was set for 8:30 PM, Eastern Standard Time, but was delayed until after the end of the Rose Bowl.

2016 Dallas Cowboys season

The 2016 Dallas Cowboys season was the franchise's 57th season in the National Football League, the eighth playing their home games at AT&T Stadium and the 6th full season under head coach Jason Garrett.

After losing their first game to the New York Giants, the Cowboys went undefeated for 11 straight games. The streak ended with them losing again to the same team in week 14, making this the first time since 2011 that the Giants would sweep the Cowboys. With division rivals Washington Redskins losing to the Arizona Cardinals in Week 13, the Cowboys clinched a playoff berth after missing the playoffs the previous year. Following the Giants' loss to the Philadelphia Eagles in Week 16, the Cowboys became NFC East champions for the second time in three years and clinched home field advantage throughout the playoffs for the first time since 2007. The 13–3 record is tied for the best record in team history, which was also set in 1992 and 2007 after a disastrous 2015 season. However, despite having the NFC's top seed as well as home-field advantage, the Cowboys suffered a devastating loss in the divisional round of the playoffs to the Green Bay Packers by a score of 31–34, ending their season and not making to the conference championship for the 22nd straight year. This was also QB Tony Romo's last season in the NFL, as he announced his retirement on April 4, 2017.

2016 Fiesta Bowl (January)

The 2016 Fiesta Bowl was a college football bowl game that was played on January 1, 2016 at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Arizona. The 44th Fiesta Bowl was one of the New Year's Bowls. It was one of the 2015–16 bowl games that concluded the 2015 FBS football season.

The game was televised on ESPN and ESPN Deportes, and broadcast on ESPN Radio and XM Satellite Radio, with the kickoff time set for 1:00 P.M. ET (11 A.M. MT). Sponsored by obstacle racing series BattleFrog, it was officially known as the BattleFrog Fiesta Bowl.Coincidentally, it took place 10 years after the 2006 Fiesta Bowl, that was also played by Ohio State and Notre Dame. That was also the last time Notre Dame participated in the Fiesta Bowl.

Ohio State wound up beating Notre Dame, 44-28.

2017 Dallas Cowboys season

The 2017 Dallas Cowboys season was the franchise's 58th season in the National Football League, the ninth playing their home games at AT&T Stadium and the seventh full season under head coach Jason Garrett. It was also the 29th season under owner Jerry Jones.

For the first time since 2002, quarterback Tony Romo was not on the opening day roster, as he announced his retirement on April 4, 2017. The Cowboys failed to make the playoffs in consecutive seasons, as they were mathematically eliminated from playoff contention after a Week 16 loss at home to the Seattle Seahawks.

2018 All-Pro Team

The 2018 All-Pro teams were named by the Associated Press (AP), Pro Football Writers of America (PFWA), and Sporting News (SN) for performance in the 2018 NFL season. While none of the All-Pro teams have the official imprimatur of the NFL (whose official recognition is nomination to the 2019 Pro Bowl), they are included in the NFL Record and Fact Book and also part of the language of the 2011 NFLPA Collective Bargaining Agreement. Any player selected to the first-team of any of the teams can be described as an "All-Pro." The AP team, with first-team and second-team selections, was chosen by a national panel of fifty NFL writers and broadcasters. The Sporting News All-NFL team is voted on by NFL players and executives and will be released at a later date. The PFWA team is selected by its more than 300 national members who are accredited media members covering the NFL.

2018 Dallas Cowboys season

The 2018 season was the Dallas Cowboys' 59th in the National Football League (NFL), their 30th under the ownership of Jerry Jones, their 10th playing their home games at AT&T Stadium, and their eighth full season under head coach Jason Garrett. AT&T Stadium also became the first stadium venue to host the annual draft. For the first time since 2009, wide receiver Dez Bryant was not on the opening day roster, as he was released on April 13, 2018 and later signed with the New Orleans Saints on November 7, 2018. For the first time since 2002, tight end Jason Witten was not on the opening day roster, having announced his retirement on May 3, 2018. For the first time since 2010, kicker Dan Bailey was not on the opening day roster, as he was released on September 1, 2018 and later signed with the Minnesota Vikings on September 17, 2018.

The Cowboys clinched the NFC East division following a Week 16 win over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and a week later, improved their 9–7 record from the previous season with a win over the New York Giants.

In the playoffs, the Cowboys defeated the Seattle Seahawks 24–22 in the Wild Card round and advanced to the Divisional round, where they lost to the Los Angeles Rams 22–30.

A'Shawn Robinson

A'Shawn Robinson (born March 21, 1995) is an American football defensive tackle for the Detroit Lions of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Alabama, and was drafted by the Lions in the second round of the 2016 NFL Draft.

He was a five-star recruit out of high school, with one service listing him as the nation's top defensive tackle. Robinson played in all 13 of Alabama's games in the 2013 season and started in two games. Robinson was the only true freshman under head coach Nick Saban at Alabama to lead the team in sacks. At 320 pounds, Robinson would line-up at both defensive end and tackle for Alabama during his freshman season. In his junior season, he appeared at fullback in goal line situations in games against LSU and Michigan State in addition to starting on the defensive line.

Crop top

A crop top (also cropped top, belly shirt, half shirt, midriff shirt, midriff top, tummy top, short shirt, and cutoff shirt) is a top, the lower part of which is high enough to expose the waist, navel, or some of the midriff.

List of National Football League rushing champions

In American football, running (also referred to as rushing) is, along with passing, one of the two main methods of advancing the ball down the field. A running play generally occurs when the quarterback hands or tosses the ball backwards to the running back, but other players, such as the quarterback, can run with the ball. In the National Football League (NFL), the player who has recorded the most rushing yards for a season is considered the winner of the rushing title for that season. In addition to the NFL rushing champion, league record books recognize the rushing champions of the American Football League (AFL), which operated from 1960 to 1969 before being absorbed into the National Football League in 1970.The NFL did not begin keeping official records until the 1932 season. The average amount of yardage the rushing champion has gained has increased over time—since the adoption of the 14-game season in 1961, all but two rushing champions have recorded over 1,000 yards rushing, and the adoption of the 16-game season in 1978 has resulted in many rushing champions recording over 1,500 rushing yards. Seven rushing champions have recorded over 2,000 rushing yards, a feat first accomplished by O. J. Simpson in 1973 and most recently accomplished by Adrian Peterson in 2012.

The player with the most rushing titles is Jim Brown, who was the rushing champion eight times over his career. Eric Dickerson, Emmitt Smith, O. J. Simpson, Steve Van Buren, and Barry Sanders are tied for the second-most rushing titles, each having won four times. Jim Brown also holds the record for the most consecutive rushing titles with five, having led the league in rushing each year from 1957 to 1961. Steve Van Buren, Emmitt Smith, and Earl Campbell each recorded three consecutive rushing titles. The Cleveland Browns have recorded the most rushing titles with eleven; the Dallas Cowboys rank second, with seven rushing titles. The most recent rushing champion is Ezekiel Elliott of the Dallas Cowboys, who led the league with 1,434 yards rushing over the 2018 season.

NFL Total Access

NFL Total Access is a television news program on the NFL Network.

The network treats it as the league's "show of record" and bills it as the only year-round show dedicated to the National Football League, despite the ESPN show NFL Live running year round as well.

It is also broadcast on Sky Sports at various times in the UK.

During the 2007 season, another edition of the program previewing the week's action aired Saturday evenings on MyNetworkTV.NFL Total Access was originally at the 7pm ET slot before being moved down to the 8pm ET time slot on September 2, 2013. On July 14, 2014, "NFL Total Access" moved back to the 7pm ET slot.

Nick Vannett

Nick Vannett (born March 6, 1993) is an American football tight end for the Seattle Seahawks of the National Football League (NFL). Vannett played his college football at Ohio State.

Noah Brown (American football)

Noah Brown (born January 6, 1996) is an American football wide receiver for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Ohio State.

Ohio State Buckeyes football yearly statistical leaders

Ohio State Buckeyes football yearly statistical leaders in points scored, rushing yards, passing yards, receptions, and total tackles.

Pat Elflein

Patrick Elflein (born July 6, 1994) is an American football center for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Ohio State, where he won the Rimington Trophy as a senior in 2016. Elflein was drafted by the Vikings in the third round of the 2017 NFL Draft.

Peter C. Harvey

Peter C. Harvey was the first African American to serve as New Jersey Attorney General. Harvey was appointed by New Jersey Governor Jim McGreevey as Acting Attorney General on February 15, 2003, and was confirmed by the New Jersey Senate as Attorney General on June 16, 2003. Harvey served until 2006, when he was succeeded by Zulima Farber. Following his resignation as Attorney General, he became a Partner in the New York City law office of Patterson, Belknap, Webb, and Tyler.Harvey was one of the advisers to the National Football League in the league's 2017 personal conduct investigation of Dallas Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott.

Ronald Leary

Ronald Leary (born April 29, 1989) is an American football guard for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Memphis and signed with the Dallas Cowboys as an undrafted free agent in 2012.

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Dallas Cowboys current roster
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Ezekiel Elliott—awards, championships, and honors

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