Extreme cinema

Extreme cinema is a genre of film distinguished by its use of excessive violence, torture, and sex of extreme nature. The rising popularity of Asian films in the 21st century has contributed to the growth of extreme cinema, although extreme cinema is still considered to be a cult-based genre. Being a relatively new genre, extreme cinema is controversial and widely unaccepted by the mainstream media.[1] Extreme cinema films target a specific and small audience group.[2]

History

The prehistory of extreme cinema can be traced back to censorship of art films and advertising tactics for classical exploitation films to Anglophone markets alongside later liberal representations of sex in the first half of the 20th Century onwards.[3]

The name "extreme cinema" originated from a “line of Asian films that share a combination of sensational features, such as extreme violence, horror and shocking plots”.[4]

Controversy

Extreme cinema is highly criticized and debated by film critics and the general public. There have been debates over the hypersexualization that makes these films a threat to the ‘mainstream’ community standards.[5]

There has also been criticism over the increasing use of violence in modern-day films. Ever since the emergence of slasher-gore films in the ’70s, the rising popularity of extreme cinema has contributed to the casual violence in popular media.[6] Some criticize the easy exposure and unintended targeting of adolescence by extreme cinema films.[7]

Classification and guidelines

The British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) classifies extreme cinema films into an "R18" rating, which is defined as “special and legally restricted classification primarily for explicit works of consenting sex or strong fetish material involving adults.”[5]

Notable films

Notable directors

See also

References

  1. ^ Dirks, Tim. “100 Most Controversial Films of All Time.” 100 Most Controversial Films of All Time. Filmsite, n.d. Web. 9 Feb. 2016.
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ Frey, Mattias (15 March 2016). "Extreme Cinema: The Transgressive Rhetoric of Today's Art Film Culture". Rutgers University Press – via Google Books.
  4. ^ Lee, Eunah. “Trauma, excess, and the aesthetics of the affect: the extreme cinemas of Chan-Wook Park.” Post Script 2014:33. Literature Resource Center. Web. 7 Feb. 2016.
  5. ^ a b Pett, E. “A New Media Landscape? The BBFC,  Extreme Cinema As Cult, And Technological Change.” New Review of Film and Television Studies 13.1 (2015): 83-99. Scopus. Web. 9 Feb. 2016    
  6. ^ Sapolsky, Barry S., Fred Moliter, and Sarah Luque. “Sex and Violence in Slasher Films: Re-examining the Assumptions.” J&MC Quarterly 80.1 (2003): 28-38. SAGE Journals. Web. 9 Feb. 2016.    
  7. ^ Sargent, James D., Todd F. Hetherton, M. Bridget Ahrens, Madeline A. Dalton, Jennifer J. Tickle, and Michael L. Beach. “Adolescent Exposure to Extremely Violent Movies.” Journal of Adolescent Health 31.6 (2002): 449-454. JAMES MADISON UNIV's Catalog. Web.
  8. ^ a b "Extreme Cinema: Top 25 Most Disturbing Films of all time – part3 - HNN". horrornews.net.
  9. ^ "Extreme Cinema". Edinburgh University Press Books.
  10. ^ The 30 Most Extreme Movies of the 21st Century So Far « Taste of Cinema
  11. ^ a b c d Mattias, Frey,. "Extreme Cinema: The Transgressive Rhetoric of Today's Art Film Culture".
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Extreme Cinema: List of Disturbing Films Compendium A-D - HNN". horrornews.net.
  13. ^ [2]
  14. ^ a b "Cultivating Extreme Art Cinema". Edinburgh University Press Books.
  15. ^ The 30 Most Extreme Movies of the 21st Century So Far « Taste of Cinema
  16. ^ [3]
  17. ^ [4]
  18. ^ [5]
  19. ^ [6]
  20. ^ [7]
  21. ^ "Extreme Asian Horror - Cat III Asian Films". horrornews.net.
  22. ^ The 30 Most Extreme Movies of the 21st Century So Far « Taste of Cinema
  23. ^ [8]
  24. ^ [9]
  25. ^ [10]
  26. ^ The 30 Most Extreme Movies of the 21st Century So Far « Taste of Cinema
  27. ^ The 30 Most Extreme Movies of the 21st Century So Far « Taste of Cinema
  28. ^ [11]
  29. ^ [12]
  30. ^ [13]
  31. ^ [14]
  32. ^ [15]
  33. ^ [16]
  34. ^ [17]
  35. ^ [18]
  36. ^ [19]
  37. ^ The 30 Most Extreme Movies of the 21st Century So Far « Taste of Cinema
  38. ^ [20]
  39. ^ [21]
  40. ^ [22]
  41. ^ [23]
  42. ^ "Against Happiness - Los Angeles Review of Books".
  43. ^ The 30 Most Extreme Movies of the 21st Century So Far « Taste of Cinema
  44. ^ "Against Happiness - Los Angeles Review of Books".
  45. ^ The 30 Most Extreme Movies of the 21st Century So Far « Taste of Cinema

Sources

  • Lee, Eunah. “Trauma, excess, and the aesthetics of the affect: the extreme cinemas of Chan-Wook Park.” Post Script 2014:33. Literature Resource Center. Web. 7 Feb. 2016.
  • Review of Film And Television Studies 13.1 (2015): 83-99. Scopus. Web. 7 Feb. 2016
  • Totaro, Donato. “Sex and Violence: Journey into Extreme Cinema.” Offscreen7.11 (2003): n. pag. Web.
  • King, Mike. The American Cinema of Excess: Extremes Of The National Mind On Film. n.p.: Jefferson, N.C : McFarland, c2009., 2009. JAMES MADISON UNIV's Catalog. Web. 10. Feb. 2016
  • Malamuth, Neil. “Media's New Mood: Sexual Violence.” Media's New Mood: Sexual Violence. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Feb. 2016.
  • Fyfe, Kristen. “More Violence, More Sex, More Troubled Kids.” Media Research Center. MRC Culture, 11 Jan. 2007. Web. 9 Feb. 2016
  • Pett, E. “A New Media Landscape? The BBFC,  Extreme Cinema As Cult, And Technological Change.” New Review of Film and Television Studies 13.1 (2015): 83-99. Scopus. Web. 9 Feb. 2016
  • Dirks, Tim. “100 Most Controversial Films of All Time.” 100 Most Controversial Films of All Time. Filmsite, n.d. Web. 9 Feb. 2016.
  • Sapolsky, Barry S., Fred Moliter, and Sarah Luque. “Sex and Violence in Slasher Films: Re-examining the Assumptions.” J&MC Quarterly 80.1 (2003): 28-38. SAGE Journals. Web. 9 Feb. 2016.
  • Sargent, James D., Todd F. Hetherton, M. Bridget Ahrens, Madeline A. Dalton, Jennifer J. Tickle, and Michael L. Beach. “Adolescent Exposure to Extremely Violent Movies.” Journal of Adolescent Health 31.6 (2002): 449-454. JAMES MADISON UNIV's Catalog. Web.

External links

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