Extended play

An extended play record, often referred to as an EP, is a musical recording that contains more tracks than a single, but is usually unqualified as an album or LP.[1][2][3] Contemporary EPs generally contain a minimum of three tracks and maximum of six tracks,[4] and are considered "less expensive and time-consuming" for an artist to produce than an album.[3] An EP originally referred to specific types of vinyl records other than 78 rpm standard play (SP) and LP,[5] but it is now applied to mid-length CDs and downloads as well.

Ricardo Baca of The Denver Post said, "EPs—originally extended-play 'single' releases that are shorter than traditional albums—have long been popular with punk and indie bands."[6] In the United Kingdom, the Official Chart Company defines a boundary between EP and album classification at 25 minutes of maximum length and no more than four tracks (not counting alternative versions of featured songs, if present).[1][2]

Michael Nesmith EP
Extended-play vinyl record

Background

EPs were released in various sizes in different eras. The earliest multi-track records, issued around 1919 by Grey Gull Records, were vertically cut 78 rpm discs known as "2-in-1" records. These had finer than usual grooves, like Edison Disc Records. By 1949, when the 45 rpm single and 33​13 rpm LP were competing formats, seven-inch 45 rpm singles had a maximum playing time of only about four minutes per side.

Partly as an attempt to compete with the LP introduced in 1948 by rival Columbia, RCA Victor introduced "Extended Play" 45s during 1952. Their narrower grooves, achieved by lowering the cutting levels and sound compression optionally, enabled them to hold up to 7.5 minutes per side—but still be played by a standard 45 rpm phonograph. These were usually 10-inch LPs (released until the mid-1950s) split onto two seven-inch EPs or 12-inch LPs split onto three seven-inch EPs, either sold separately or together in gatefold covers. This practice became much less common with the advent of triple-speed-available phonographs.

Some classical music albums released at the beginning of the LP era were also distributed as EP albums—notably, the seven operas that Arturo Toscanini conducted on radio between 1944 and 1954. These opera EPs, originally broadcast on the NBC Radio network and manufactured by RCA, which owned the NBC network then, were made available both in 45 rpm and 33​13 rpm. In the 1990s, they began appearing on compact discs. RCA also had success in the format with their top money earner, Elvis Presley, issuing 28 Elvis EPs between 1956 and 1967, many of which topped the separate Billboard EP chart during its brief existence.

During the 1950s, RCA published several EP albums of Walt Disney movies, containing both the story and the songs. These usually featured the original casts of actors and actresses. Each album contained two seven-inch records, plus a fully illustrated booklet containing the text of the recording so that children could follow along by reading. Some of the titles included Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937), Pinocchio (1940), and what was then a recent release, the movie version of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea that was presented in 1954. The recording and publishing of 20,000 was unusual: it did not employ the movie's cast, and years later, a 12 in 33⅓ rpm album, with a nearly identical script, but another different cast, was sold by Disneyland Records in conjunction with the re-release of the movie in 1963.

Because of the popularity of 7" and other formats, SP (78 rpm, 10") records became less popular and the production of SPs in Japan was suspended in 1963.[7][8]

In the 1950s and 1960s, EPs were usually compilations of singles or album samplers and were typically played at 45 rpm on seven-inch (18 cm) discs, with two songs on each side.[9][10] Other than those published by RCA, EPs were relatively uncommon in the United States and Canada, but they were widely sold in the United Kingdom, and in some other European countries, during the 1950s and 1960s. Record Retailer printed the first EP chart in 1960. The New Musical Express (NME), Melody Maker, Disc and Music Echo and the Record Mirror continued to list EPs on their respective singles charts. The Beatles' Twist and Shout outsold most singles for some weeks in 1963. When the BBC and Record Retailer commissioned the British Market Research Bureau (BMRB) to compile a chart it was restricted to singles and EPs disappeared from the listings.

In the Philippines, seven-inch EPs marketed as "mini-LPs" (but distinctly different from the mini-LPs of the 1980s) were introduced in 1970, with tracks selected from an album and packaging resembling the album they were taken from.[11] This mini-LP format also became popular in America in the early 1970s for promotional releases, and also for use in jukeboxes.[12]

Stevie Wonder included a bonus four-song EP with his double LP Songs in the Key of Life in 1976. During the 1970s and 1980s, there was less standardization and EPs were made on seven-inch (18 cm), 10-inch (25 cm) or 12-inch (30 cm) discs running either 33​13 or 45 rpm. Some novelty EPs used odd shapes and colors, and a few of them were picture discs.

Alice in Chains was the first band to ever have an EP reach number one on the Billboard album chart. Its EP, Jar of Flies, was released on January 25, 1994. In 2004, Linkin Park and Jay-Z's collaboration EP, Collision Course, was the next to reach the number one spot after Alice in Chains. In 2010, the cast of the television series Glee became the first artist to have two EPs reach number one, with Glee: The Music, The Power of Madonna on the week of May 8, 2010, and Glee: The Music, Journey to Regionals on the week of June 26, 2010.

In 2010, Warner Bros. Records revived the format with their "Six-Pak" offering of six songs on a compact disc.[13]

Definition

The first EPs were seven-inch vinyl records with more tracks than a normal single (typically five to nine of them). Although they shared size and speed with singles, they were a recognizably different format than the seven-inch single. Although they could be named after a lead track, they were generally given a different title.[9] Examples include The Beatles' The Beatles' Hits EP from 1963, and The Troggs' Troggs Tops EP from 1966, both of which collected previously released tracks.[9] The playing time was generally between 10 and 15 minutes.[9] They also came in cardboard picture sleeves at a time when singles were usually issued in paper company sleeves. EPs tended to be album samplers or collections of singles. EPs of all original material began to appear in the 1950s. Examples are Elvis Presley's Love Me Tender from 1956 and "Just for You", "Peace in the Valley" and "Jailhouse Rock" from 1957, and The Kinks' Kinksize Session from 1964.

Twelve-inch EPs were similar, but generally had between three and five tracks and a length of over 12 minutes.[9] Like seven-inch EPs, these were given titles.[9] EP releases were also issued in cassette and 10-inch vinyl formats.[9] With the advent of the compact disc (CD), more music was often included on "single" releases, with four or five tracks being common, and playing times of up to 25 minutes.[9] These extended-length singles became known as maxi singles and while commensurate in length to an EP were distinguished by being designed to feature a single song, with the remaining songs considered B-sides, whereas an EP was designed not to feature a single song, instead resembling a mini album.

EPs of original material regained popularity in the punk rock era, when they were commonly used for the release of new material, e.g. Buzzcocks' Spiral Scratch EP.[9] These featured four-track seven-inch singles played at 33​13 rpm, the most common understanding of the term EP.

Beginning in the 1980s, many so-called "singles" have been sold in formats with more than two tracks. Because of this, the definition of an EP is not determined only by the number of tracks or the playing time; an EP is typically seen as four (or more) tracks of equal importance, as opposed to a four-track single with an obvious A-side and three B-sides.

In the United States, the Recording Industry Association of America, the organization that declares releases "gold" or "platinum" based on numbers of sales, defines an EP as containing three to five songs or under 30 minutes.[14] On the other hand, The Recording Academy's rules for Grammy Awards state that any release with five or more different songs and a running time of over 15 minutes is considered an album, with no mention of EPs.[15]

In the United Kingdom, any record with more than four distinct tracks or with a playing time of more than 25 minutes is classified as an album for sales-chart purposes. If priced as a single, they will not qualify for the main album chart but can appear in the separate Budget Albums chart.[2]

An intermediate format between EPs and full-length LPs is the mini-LP, which was a common album format in the 1980s. These generally contained 20–30 minutes of music and about seven tracks.[9]

In underground dance music, vinyl EPs have been a longstanding medium for releasing new material, e.g. Fourteenth Century Sky by The Dust Brothers.

Double EPs

A double extended play is a name typically given to vinyl records or compact discs released as a set of two discs, each of which would normally qualify as an EP. The name is thus analogous to double album. As vinyl records, the most common format for the double EP, they consist of a pair of 7" discs recorded at 45 or 33​13 rpm, or two 12" discs recorded at 45 rpm. The format is useful when an album's worth of material is being pressed by a small plant geared for the production of singles rather than albums and may have novelty value which can be turned to advantage for publicity purposes. Double EPs are rare, since the amount of material recordable on a double EP could usually be more economically and sensibly recorded on a single vinyl LP.

In the 1950s, Capitol Records had released a number of double EPs by its more popular artists, including Les Paul. The pair of double EPs (EBF 1-577, sides 1 to 8!) were described on the original covers as "parts... of a four-part album". In 1960, Joe Meek's I Hear a New World double EP was released in 1960 and has since become a collector's item. Probably the most well-known double EP is The Beatles' Magical Mystery Tour, released as a double 7" EP in the United Kingdom eleven days after the long-playing version, which became the standard for compact disc reissue, was released in the United States. The Style Council album The Cost of Loving was originally issued as two 12" EPs.

It is becoming more common to release two 12" 45s rather than a single 12" LP. Though there are 11 songs that total about 40 minutes, enough for one LP, the songs are spread across two 12" 45 rpm discs. Also, the vinyl pressing of Hail to the Thief by Radiohead uses this practice but is considered to be a full-length album. In 1982 Cabaret Voltaire released their studio album "2x45" on the UK-based label Rough Trade, featuring extended tracks over four sides of two 12" 45 rpm discs, with graphics by artist Neville Brody. The band subsequently released a further album in this format, 1985's "Drinking Gasoline", on the Virgin Records label.

There are a limited number of double EPs which serve other purposes, however. An example of this is the Dunedin Double EP, which contains tracks by four different bands. Using a double EP in this instance allowed each band to have its tracks occupying a different side. In addition, the groove on the physical record could be wider and thus allow for a louder album.

Jukebox EP

Filben Maestro juke box 01
Filben Maestro 78 rpm jukebox

In the 1960s and 1970s, record companies released EP versions of long-play (LP) albums for use in jukeboxes. These were commonly known as "compact 33s" or "little LPs". It was played at 33​13 rpm, was pressed on seven-inch vinyl and frequently had as many as six songs. What made them EP-like was that some songs were omitted for time purposes, and the tracks deemed the most popular were left on. Unlike most EPs before them, and most seven-inch vinyl in general (pre-1970s), these were issued in stereo.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Austin, Chris; Blyth, Lucy (March 2015). "Rules for Chart Eligibility – Singles" (PDF). Official Charts Company. Retrieved March 21, 2017.
  2. ^ a b c Austin, Chris; Blyth, Lucy (March 2015). "Rules for Chart Eligibility – Albums" (PDF). Official Charts Company. Retrieved March 21, 2017.
  3. ^ a b Fuhr, Michael (2015). Globalization and Popular Music in South Korea: Sounding Out K-Pop. Routledge. ISBN 9781317556909. Retrieved March 21, 2017. Mini-albums and EPs are shorter than full-length albums and usually contain four or five songs [...] They are less expensive and time-consuming in production than albums, and they help to popularize new groups who otherwise lack the number of songs required for a full-length album.
  4. ^ "What Does EP Stand for in Music?". Retrieved July 10, 2018. Four tracks if you’re going to be generous with it to use as a promotional EP and six if you want to make some dough off it.
  5. ^ Maes, Jan; Vercammen, Marc (2001). Digital Audio Technology: A Guide to CD, MiniDisc, SACD, DVD(A), MP3 and DAT (4th ed.). Focal Press. p. 2. ISBN 9780240516547. Retrieved June 20, 2014.
  6. ^ Baca, Ricardo (January 4, 2010). "As albums fade away, music industry looks to shorter records". The Denver Post. Chattanooga Times Free Press. Retrieved July 21, 2010.
  7. ^ "A brief description of the Japanese recording industry 2000" (PDF). Recording Industry Association of Japan. Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 July 2004.
  8. ^ レコード産業界の歴史 1960年~1969年 [The History of The Record Industry 1960–1969] (in Japanese). Recording Industry Association of Japan. Retrieved July 23, 2010.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Strong, Martin C. (2002). The Great Rock Discography (6th ed.). Canongate. ISBN 978-1-84195-312-0.
  10. ^ Shuker, Roy (2005). "Singles; EPs". Popular Music: The Key Concepts. Routledge. p. 246. ISBN 978-0-415-34770-9. Retrieved June 20, 2014.
  11. ^ Salazar, Oskar (June 13, 1970). "Philippines Gets First Mini-LP". Billboard: 80–81.
  12. ^ "7-in. LP Growing Concept". Billboard: 39. March 25, 1972.
  13. ^ Price, Deborah Evans (February 3, 2010). "Another Body Blow For Albums: Warner To Launch New Six-Pak Format". Billboard. Retrieved February 3, 2010.
  14. ^ "About the Awards – RIAA". Recording Industry Association of America.
  15. ^ "Awards Process Updates". The Recording Academy. July 8, 2015.
Austin Mahone

Austin Harris Mahone (; born April 4, 1996) is an American singer and songwriter. Mahone gained popularity when his covers became very popular on YouTube. He is currently signed to Atlantic Records as of 2019.

BTS albums discography

South Korean boy group BTS have released six studio albums (one of which was reissued under a different title), four compilation albums and five extended plays.

The group debuted in South Korea on June 13, 2013 with the single album 2 Cool 4 Skool. They made a comeback on September 2013 with an extended play, O!RUL8,2?. In February 2014, BTS released their second extended play, Skool Luv Affair. This marked the first time their album charted on the Billboard World Albums chart, and Japan's Oricon Albums Chart. A repackaged version of the album, Skool Luv Affair Special Addition was released in May 2014.

BTS released their first studio album, Dark & Wild in August 2014. It was their first album to break into the US Top Heatseekers chart. To wrap up 2014, BTS made their Japanese debut in December 2014 with first Japanese studio album Wake Up. All of their Japanese singles—"No More Dream", released on June 4; "Boy in Luv", released on July 16; and "Danger", released on November 19—made it into the top 10 of the Oricon Albums Chart as well as the Japan Hot 100.

The group's third extended play, The Most Beautiful Moment In Life, Part 1, was released in April 2015. BTS made a comeback with their fourth extended play, The Most Beautiful Moment in Life, Part 2, in November 2015. For the first time, the group entered the Billboard 200 at 171 with the EP. It also topped the Billboard Top Heatseekers and World Albums charts for 4 weeks, the most by a South Korean act. Their first compilation album, The Most Beautiful Moment in Life: Young Forever was released in May 2016.

In September 2016, BTS released their second Japanese studio album, entitled Youth, selling over 44,000 copies in its first day of release. It become the group's first studio album to top both the daily and weekly Oricon albums charts. To wrap up 2016, the group released their second studio album, Wings in October 2016. It debuted at 26 on the Billboard 200, making it the highest-ranking Korean album ever on the chart at the time. Its repackage album, You Never Walk Alone, was released in February 2017.

BTS' fifth extended play, Love Yourself: Her, was then released in September 2017. The EP opened at number seven on the US Billboard 200 with 31,000 album-equivalent units, making it the highest-charting K-pop album on the chart and biggest sales week of a K-pop album to date.Their third Japanese studio album, Face Yourself, was released in April 2018. It debuted at number 43 on the Billboard 200 with 12,000 album-equivalent units, making it the third-highest-charting Japanese album in the history of the chart. Just one month later, it became their first Japanese album to be certified Platinum by the RIAJ, selling over 250,000 copies within that time. BTS's third Korean studio album, Love Yourself: Tear, was released on May 18, 2018, and debuted at number one on the US Billboard 200, becoming the group's highest-charting album in a Western market, as well as the first K-pop album to top the US albums chart and the highest-charting album by an Asian act. In 2018, the group had the second best total album sales in the US, behind Eminem. In Korea, BTS accounted for 65% of the total albums sold in 2018. In 2019, the group scored their third number one with Map of the Soul: Persona, BTS’ sixth extended play, on the US Billboard 200 making them the first group since The Beatles in 1996 to have three number one albums in less than a year.[1]

Christina Perri

Christina Judith Perri (born August 19, 1986) is an American singer and songwriter from Bucks County, Pennsylvania. After her debut single "Jar of Hearts" was featured on the television series So You Think You Can Dance in 2010, Perri signed with Atlantic Records and released her debut extended play, The Ocean Way Sessions. Her debut studio album, Lovestrong (2011), followed soon after and has since been certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA).Perri also gained recognition for writing and recording "A Thousand Years", the love theme for the film The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 2 (2012), which appears on the accompanying soundtrack. The song went on to sell over 4 million copies in the United States, being certified 4× platinum. She later released her second extended play, A Very Merry Perri Christmas (2012), followed by her second studio album, Head or Heart (2014).

Evanescence

Evanescence () is an American rock band founded in Little Rock, Arkansas, in 1995 by singer and pianist Amy Lee and guitarist Ben Moody. After recording independent albums, the band released their first full-length album, Fallen, on Wind-up Records in 2003. Fallen sold more than 17 million copies worldwide and helped the band win two Grammy Awards out of seven nominations. A year later, Evanescence released their first live album, Anywhere but Home, which sold more than one million copies worldwide. In 2006, the band released their second studio album, The Open Door, which sold more than five million copies.The lineup of the group changed several times over the course of the first two studio albums' productions and promotions: David Hodges left in 2002, co-founder Moody left in 2003 (mid-tour), bassist Will Boyd in 2006, followed by guitarist John LeCompt and drummer Rocky Gray in 2007, and Terry Balsamo in 2015. As a result, none of the band's three studio albums feature the same lineup. The latter two changes led to a hiatus, with temporary band members contributing to tour performances.

The band reconvened in June 2009 with a new lineup; their next studio album, Evanescence, was released in 2011. It debuted at the top of the Billboard 200 chart with 127,000 copies in sales. The album also debuted at number one on four other different Billboard charts; the Rock Albums, Digital Albums, Alternative Albums, and the Hard Rock Albums charts. The band spent 2012 on tour in promotion of their latest album with other bands including The Pretty Reckless and Fair to Midland. Troy McLawhorn also became a full-time band member during this time. Following the end of the album's tour cycle in 2012, the band entered another hiatus.

In 2015, Evanescence emerged from hiatus and announced they would resume touring; however, they denied that new Evanescence material was being produced, as Lee was focusing on a solo project instead. In addition, Balsamo left the band and was replaced by Jen Majura. Late 2016 saw additional touring from the band and a statement from Lee that Evanescence would continue. In March 2017, Lee stated Evanescence was working on a fourth album for release later in 2017. Synthesis was released worldwide on November 10, 2017, and marked a stylistic change in the band's sound.

Extended Play (Fleetwood Mac EP)

Extended Play is an EP by British-American rock band Fleetwood Mac, released in 2013. Released as a digital download only by the band themselves and without a record company, it was the band's first new music in ten years, since their 2003 album Say You Will was released.

Fifth Harmony

Fifth Harmony (often shortened to 5H) is an American girl group based in Miami, composed of Ally Brooke, Normani Kordei, Dinah Jane, Lauren Jauregui, and previously Camila Cabello until her departure from the group in December 2016. The group signed a joint record deal with Simon Cowell's label Syco Records and L.A. Reid's label Epic Records after forming and finishing third in the second season of the American singing competition series The X Factor in 2012. Rising to prominence by social media, the group's debut extended play and their three studio albums all charted within the top ten of the Billboard 200 in the United States.

Following their exit from The X Factor, they released their debut single "Miss Movin' On", preceding their extended play Better Together, certified gold in the United States. Its music video won the group the MTV Video Music Award for Artist to Watch. The group released their debut studio album Reflection in 2015, also receiving a gold certification in the country. The album included the singles "Boss", "Sledgehammer" and "Worth It". The latter achieved triple platinum certification in the United States and reached the top-ten in thirteen countries. The following year, "Work from Home", the lead single from their second album 7/27, became the group's first top-ten single on the Billboard Hot 100 and the first top-five by a girl group in a decade on that chart. They released their self-titled third album in 2017.

Their accolades include three MTV Europe Music Awards, four MTV Video Music Awards, four iHeartRadio Music Awards, an American Music Award, a Billboard Women in Music award and six Teen Choice Awards. As of December 2016, in the United States, Fifth Harmony has sold a total of 456,000 albums, seven million digital songs and earned 1.6 billion on-demand streams, according to Nielsen Soundscan. The group went on hiatus in May 2018, allowing the members to pursue solo projects.

Hyuna

Kim Hyun-ah (born June 6, 1992), better known by the mononym Hyuna, is a South Korean singer-songwriter, rapper and model. She debuted as a member of the girl group Wonder Girls in February 2007. After leaving the ensemble shortly after, Hyuna subsequently left JYP Entertainment and joined the girl group 4Minute, under Cube Entertainment. 4Minute debuted in June 2009 and went on to become one of the most popular girl groups in the country.

In 2010, Hyuna began a solo career with a style she described as "performance-oriented music". Her debut single "Change" charted at number two on South Korea's Gaon Digital Chart. In 2011, Hyuna earned wider public recognition with the release of her first extended play Bubble Pop!. The title track sold more than three million digital copies and she became the first female K-pop solo artist to reach 100 million views on a single music video on YouTube. In 2012, she appeared in a successful duet rendition of Psy's worldwide hit "Gangnam Style" and later released her second extended play Melting, which spawned her first number one single "Ice Cream". Following 4Minute's disbandment in mid 2016, she released her fifth extended play A'wesome, which was supported by her first concert tour The Queen's Back.

Hyuna has released six extended plays since her professional solo debut and has collaborated with several artists under Cube Entertainment. In 2011, she formed the duo Trouble Maker with former Beast member Hyunseung, which spawned two number one singles, including "Trouble Maker". In 2017, she was involved in the trio Triple H with Pentagon members Hui and E'Dawn.

In 2018, Hyuna ended her contract with Cube Entertainment after several internal conflicts, and signed with Psy's P-Nation the following year.

Kid Galahad (EP)

Kid Galahad is an EP by American singer Elvis Presley, containing six songs from the motion picture of the same name. Six songs were recorded for the film and the soundtrack was issued as an extended play record in August 1962 to coincide with the film's premiere. The extended play record was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America on March 27, 1992 for the sales of 250 thousand copies.. The featured song from the album, "King of the Whole Wide World," received Top 40 radio airplay and reached #30 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. The extended play record was the number-one EP in the UK for 17 weeks.

Miley Cyrus discography

American singer Miley Cyrus has released six studio albums, one live album, one extended play (EP), twenty-nine singles and seven promotional singles. Cyrus is known for starring as the title character in the Disney Channel television series Hannah Montana. As of 2014, Cyrus' total album sales, including her work as her "Hannah Montana" character, stand at 15.9 million. In June 2007, the series' second soundtrack and Cyrus' debut studio album were jointly released by Walt Disney Records and Hollywood Records as the double album Hannah Montana 2: Meet Miley Cyrus. The project reached number one in the United States. Its latter disc included the single "See You Again", which became Cyrus' first track to impact the top-ten in the United States, Australia, and Canada. On her debut live album Best of Both Worlds Concert, released in March 2008, Cyrus performed seven songs as herself and seven tracks as her title character Hannah Montana.

The singer's second studio album Breakout was released in July 2008, topping the United States, Australian, and Canadian charts. Its lead single "7 Things" reached the top 10 in the United States, Australia, and Norway. She recorded two tracks as herself for the soundtrack for the feature film Hannah Montana: The Movie, which came out in March 2009. The soundtrack's lead single "The Climb" peaked within the top five in the United States, Australia, Canada, Ireland, and Norway. Cyrus' first extended play The Time of Our Lives followed in August 2009, and its track "Party in the U.S.A." made the top five in the United States, Canada, Ireland, and New Zealand. She released her third studio album Can't Be Tamed in June 2010, peaking within the top five in the United States, Australia, Austria, Canada, Germany, Ireland, Italy, and New Zealand. While the title track reached the top 10 in the United States, Canada, Ireland, and New Zealand, the album was less commercially successful than her past efforts.

Cyrus' fourth studio album Bangerz was released through RCA Records in October 2013, topping the United States, Australia, Canada, Ireland, Norway, and the United Kingdom charts. Its songs "We Can't Stop" and "Wrecking Ball" both reached the summit in the United Kingdom while former also topped the charts in New Zealand and the latter went number one in the United States and Canada. Her fifth album, Miley Cyrus & Her Dead Petz, was released via streaming in August 2015 and did not chart. She released her sixth album Younger Now in September 2017, which charted within the top five in the United States, Australia, Canada, Ireland, and New Zealand. Its lead single "Malibu" reached the top five in Australia, Canada, Norway, and New Zealand.

Miranda Cosgrove

Miranda Taylor Cosgrove (born May 14, 1993) is an American actress and singer. Her career began at the age of seven with several television commercial appearances. Cosgrove's film debut came in 2003, when she appeared as Summer Hathaway in School of Rock. She appeared in a number of minor television roles over several years before coming to prominence as Megan Parker on the Nickelodeon television series Drake & Josh. In 2007, she landed the role of Carly Shay, the lead character on the Nickelodeon teen sitcom iCarly, on which she starred until 2012. As of May 2010, Cosgrove earned $180,000 per episode of iCarly, making her the second-highest-paid child star on television, and in 2012 was listed in the Guinness World Records as the highest paid child actress. Cosgrove also voiced Margo in the animated film Despicable Me (2010) and its sequels. In 2016, she starred as Shea Moore on the short-lived NBC sitcom Crowded.In music, Cosgrove debuted with iCarly (2008), a soundtrack album for the series in which she performs four songs. In 2009, she released her debut extended play, About You Now. Cosgrove's debut studio album, Sparks Fly, was released in April 2010, followed by her second extended play, High Maintenance, the following year. The EP's lead single, "Dancing Crazy", written by Avril Lavigne, debuted at number 40 on the US Billboard Adult Pop Songs and peaked at number 100 on the Billboard Hot 100.

NOFX

NOFX is an American punk rock band from Los Angeles, California. They were formed in 1983 by vocalist/bassist Fat Mike (formerly of False Alarm) and guitarist Eric Melvin. Drummer Erik Sandin joined NOFX shortly after, and El Hefe joined the band in 1991 to play lead guitar and trumpet, rounding out the current line-up.

NOFX's mainstream success was signified by a growing interest in punk rock during the 1990s, though unlike many of their contemporaries (including Bad Religion, Green Day and The Offspring), they have never been signed to a major label. NOFX has released thirteen studio albums, sixteen extended plays and a number of seven-inch singles. The band rose to popularity with their fifth studio album Punk in Drublic (1994). Their latest studio album, First Ditch Effort, was released on October 7, 2016. The group has sold over 8 million records worldwide, making them one of the most successful independent bands of all time. NOFX broadcasts their own show on Fuse TV entitled NOFX: Backstage Passport.

Sevyn Streeter

Amber Denise Streeter (born July 7, 1986), known by her stage name Sevyn Streeter, is an American singer and songwriter, best known for being a member of the girl groups TG4 and RichGirl where she was known as Se7en. She signed to Atlantic Records and released her debut single "I Like It" in 2012.

Her debut extended play Call Me Crazy, But... was released on December 3, 2013. It sold over 17,000 copies within its first week and spawning her first top 40 hit single "It Won't Stop", and "Next". The single achieved gold certification from RIAA marking it as her biggest selling single to date. In 2015, her first extended play (EP) Shoulda Been There, Pt. 1 was released. The extended play was preceded by two singles "Don't Kill the Fun" and "Shoulda Been There".

Her debut studio album Girl Disrupted was released on July 7, 2017. The album has been preceded by the release of five singles "Prolly", "My Love for You", "D4L", "Before I Do" and "Fallen". She has written songs for artists such as Chris Brown, K. Michelle, Usher, Kelly Rowland, Ariana Grande, Trey Songz, Alicia Keys, Fantasia, Brandy, and Tamar Braxton.

Sister Hazel

Not to be confused with Hazel (band)

Sister Hazel is an American alternative rock band from Gainesville, Florida, whose style blends elements of jangle pop, folk rock, classic rock 'n' roll and southern rock. Their music is characterized by highly melodic tunes and prominent harmonies. Most of their songs have optimistic lyrics. The band's instrumentation often features abrupt shifts among electric, acoustic and a cappella, with striking use of tacets. Though often described as alternative, Sister Hazel leans toward an upbeat sound and away from the clashing punk discordance often associated with the alternative rock genre. There have been no changes to the band's main lineup after over 20 years, although guitarist Ryan Newell was only listed as a guest musician on their debut album, and non-original member Dave LaGrande has been touring with them since 2012.

Sky Ferreira

Sky Tonia Ferreira (born July 8, 1992) is an American singer, songwriter, model, and actress. As a teenager, Ferreira began uploading videos on Myspace of herself singing songs she had written, which led to her discovery by producers Bloodshy & Avant and an eventual recording contract with Parlophone in 2009. She released her first extended play, As If!, in 2011, which combined elements of electropop and dance music. Ferreira's second extended play Ghost (2012), however, incorporated pop with more stripped-down song structures and featured collaborations with Jon Brion and Shirley Manson, as well as the critically acclaimed track "Everything Is Embarrassing", which she composed with Dev Hynes.

After multiple delays and disputes with her record label, Ferreira's debut studio album Night Time, My Time was released on October 29, 2013, and marked a departure from her former style, incorporating more experimental indie rock with synth-pop elements. The album was preceded by its lead single "You're Not the One". That year, she ventured into the film industry after appearing in Eli Roth's The Green Inferno and garnered media attention after being arrested for drug possession. She was exposed to a mainstream audience after having been announced as an opening act for the international Bangerz Tour, headlined by Miley Cyrus, which began on February 14, 2014.

Ferreira's earlier work incorporated elements of dance-pop, while her recent projects experiment with acoustic, new wave and primarily indie rock musical styles. Her lyrical content originally incorporated themes of rebellion and teenage romance, and has since evolved to discuss personal insecurities and more mature romantic themes. Outside her work in the entertainment industry, she has modeled for several brands and magazines, including serving as the spokeswoman for the hair care brand Redken in 2014.

Tash Sultana

Tash Sultana (born 15 June 1995) is an Australian singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, described as a "one-person band". Sultana's 2016 single "Jungle" was voted into third place in the Triple J Hottest 100, 2016; Sultana also had three songs voted into the Triple J Hottest 100, 2017.Sultana grew up in Melbourne, and has been playing guitar from the age of three, beginning a career in music through busking. An active musician on Bandcamp since 2013, Sultana's recordings were viewed millions of times on YouTube in 2016. Sultana's EP, Notion, was released on 23 September 2016, followed by a sold-out world tour in early 2017.

Troye Sivan

Troye Sivan Mellet ( TROY sih-VAHN; born 5 June 1995), is a South African-born Australian singer, songwriter, actor, and YouTuber. After gaining popularity as a singer on YouTube and in Australian talent competitions, Sivan signed with EMI Australia in 2013 and released his debut extended play, TRXYE (2014), which peaked at number five on the U.S. Billboard 200. Its lead single, "Happy Little Pill", reached number 10 on Australian music charts. In 2015, he released his second extended play Wild followed by his debut studio album Blue Neighbourhood, whose lead single "Youth" became Sivan's first single to enter the top 40 of the Billboard Hot 100 chart, peaking at number 23. His second studio album Bloom (2018) reached number three in Australia and number four on the Billboard 200 chart. Its lead single "My My My!" became Sivan's second number-one single on the Billboard Dance Club Songs chart.As an actor, Sivan portrayed the younger version of the titular character in the 2009 X-Men film X-Men Origins: Wolverine and starred as the title character in the Spud film trilogy. As a YouTube personality, Sivan used to upload video blogs regularly and, as of 2016, has over 4 million subscribers and over 241 million total views. His video, "The 'Boyfriend' Tag", with fellow vlogger Tyler Oakley earned them a Teen Choice Award in the "Choice Web Collaboration" category. In October 2014, Time named Sivan as one of the "25 Most Influential Teens of 2014". In 2018, he received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Original Song for "Revelation", from the film Boy Erased, in which he also had a supporting acting role.

Won't Get Fooled Again (EP)

Won't Get Fooled Again is an extended play of songs by The Who released in 1988 by Polydor Records. This EP was only released in the United Kingdom.

X-Play

X-Play (previously GameSpot TV and Extended Play) is a TV program about video games that ran between July 4, 1998, and January 23, 2013. The program, known for its reviews and comedy skits, aired on G4 in the United States, G4 Canada in Canada, FUEL TV in Australia, Ego in Israel, GXT in Italy, MTV Россия in Russia and Solar Sports in the Philippines.

The show in its final incarnation was hosted by Morgan Webb and Blair Herter, with Kristin Adams (née Holt) and Jessica Chobot serving as special correspondents/co-hosts (Tiffany Smith, Alex Sim-Wise and Joel Gourdin have also served as correspondents during the show's run). Adam Sessler was the original host of the program; he previously co-hosted with Lauren Fielder and Kate Botello.

X-Play began on the ZDTV network in 1998 as GameSpot TV, where Sessler co-hosted with Fielder for the show's first year, then co-hosted with Botello up through 2002 (the producers of ZDTV originally had plans to air a video-game program when the channel launched called Extended Play that would be hosted by Simon Rex; however, when an agreement was reached with the makers of the newly created GameSpot website, plans for the original show's format were scrapped in favor of a GameSpot-branded program, and Rex was dropped as host).

The show assumed the previously rejected Extended Play moniker in 2001 after ZDTV changed to TechTV and the partnership with Ziff Davis' GameSpot ended. Botello left in early 2002, and Sessler hosted the show by himself up until April 2003, when Webb joined the cast and the show was renamed X-Play.

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