Exeter River

The Exeter River is a 40.5-mile-long (65.2 km)[1] river located in Rockingham County in southeastern New Hampshire, United States.

It rises in the town of Chester, 12 miles (19 km) southeast of Manchester. It follows a winding course east and northeast to Exeter, where it becomes the Squamscott River, a tidal river leading north to Great Bay. There are falls and small dams at several locations along the river. A significant dam (Great Dam) that had long existed at the river's termination in Exeter was removed in the summer of 2016, restoring the river's flow to its natural state where it meets the Squamscott River.[2]

The Exeter River drainage basin encompasses an area of 126 square miles (330 km2). The upper 33.3 miles (53.6 km) of the river, from its headwaters to its confluence with Great Brook in Exeter, were designated into the NH Rivers Management and Protection Program in August 1995.

Coordinates: 42°58′56″N 70°56′45″W / 42.9823°N 70.9459°W

Exeter River, Exeter, NH
Exeter River in 1907, Exeter, New Hampshire.

See also

References

  1. ^ New Hampshire GRANIT state geographic information system Archived August 3, 2013, at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ Town of Exeter Great Dam Removal Project page

External links

Brentwood, New Hampshire

Brentwood is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. As of the 2010 census, the town had a total population of 4,486. Brentwood has been the county seat of Rockingham County since 1997.

Chester, New Hampshire

Chester is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 4,768 at the 2010 census. It was home to the now defunct Chester College (formerly White Pines College).

East Kingston, New Hampshire

East Kingston is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 2,357 at the 2010 census.

Exeter, New Hampshire

Exeter is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 14,306 at the 2010 census and an estimated 15,317 in 2018. Exeter was the county seat until 1997, when county offices were moved to neighboring Brentwood. Home to the Phillips Exeter Academy, a private university-preparatory school, Exeter is situated where the Exeter River feeds the tidal Squamscott River.

The urban portion of the town, where 9,242 people resided at the 2010 census, is defined by the U. S. Census Bureau as the Exeter census-designated place.

Exeter is named after the historic city in Devon, England.

Exeter (CDP), New Hampshire

Exeter is a census-designated place (CDP) and the main village in the town of Exeter in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population of the CDP was 9,242 at the 2010 census, out of 14,306 people in the entire town of Exeter.

Fremont, New Hampshire

Fremont is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 4,283 at the 2010 census. Fremont is crossed by the Rockingham Recreation Trail (a rail trail) and NH Route 107.

Kensington, New Hampshire

Kensington is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 2,124 at the 2010 census.

Kingston, New Hampshire

Kingston is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population at the 2010 census was 6,025.

List of generic forms in place names in Ireland and the United Kingdom

This article lists a number of common generic forms in place names in the British Isles, their meanings and some examples of their use. The study of place names is called toponymy; for a more detailed examination of this subject in relation to British and Irish place names, refer to Toponymy in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

Key to languages: ; Bry - Brythonic; C - Cumbric; K - Cornish; I - Irish; L - Latin; ME - Middle English; NF - Norman French; OE - Old English (Anglo-Saxon); ON - Old Norse; P - Pictish; S - Scots; SG - Scots Gaelic; W - Welsh

List of rivers of New Hampshire

This is a list of rivers and significant streams in the U.S. state of New Hampshire.

All watercourses named "River" (freshwater or tidal) are listed here, as well as other streams which are either subject to the New Hampshire Comprehensive Shoreland Protection Act or are more than 10 miles (16 km) long. New Hampshire rivers and streams qualify for state shoreland protection (and are listed here in bold) if they are fourth-order or larger water bodies, based on the Strahler method of stream order classification.

Little River (Brentwood, New Hampshire)

The Little River is a 7.3 mile long (11.7 km) river in the towns of Kingston and Brentwood in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, in the United States. It is a tributary of the Exeter River, part of the Great Bay/Piscataqua River watershed in the New Hampshire Seacoast region. The river should not be confused with the Little River of Exeter, New Hampshire, another tributary of the Exeter River less than three miles away.

The Little River rises in the northwestern part of Kingston, New Hampshire, and follows a winding course generally northeast through flat or slightly hilly terrain. The river turns north as it enters Brentwood and reaches the Exeter River east of Brentwood's town center.

Little River (Exeter, New Hampshire)

The Little River is a 7.2 mile long (11.6 km) river largely in the town of Exeter in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, in the United States. It is a tributary of the Exeter River, part of the Great Bay/Piscataqua River watershed in the New Hampshire Seacoast region. The river should not be confused with the Little River of Brentwood and Kingston, another Exeter River tributary less than three miles to the west.

The Little River rises in the northeastern corner of Brentwood, New Hampshire, and flows east, quickly entering the town limits of Exeter. The river flows southeast through wetlands and past low hills, passing just west of the downtown part of Exeter. The river flows into the Exeter River at the southern edge of the campus of Phillips Exeter Academy.

Little River (New Hampshire)

The Little River in New Hampshire may refer to:

Little River (Ammonoosuc River), a tributary of the Ammonoosuc River

Little River (Big River), a tributary of the Big River

Little River (Brentwood, New Hampshire), a tributary of the Exeter River

Little River (Exeter, New Hampshire), another tributary of the Exeter River

Little River (Lamprey River), a tributary of the Lamprey River

Little River (Merrimack River) in New Hampshire and Massachusetts, a tributary of the Merrimack River

Little River (New Hampshire Atlantic coast), in the Seacoast region of New Hampshire

New Hampshire Route 107

New Hampshire Route 107 is a 69.108-mile-long (111.219 km) north–south state highway in eastern New Hampshire. It connects Laconia in the Lakes Region with Seabrook on the Atlantic coast. The southern terminus of NH 107 is at U.S. Route 1 in Seabrook near the entrance to Seabrook Station Nuclear Power Plant. The northern terminus is at U.S. Route 3 on the Laconia/Gilford town line.

The highway is signed north-south, but follows a more southeast-to-northwest alignment. Although the route stretches for almost 70 miles (110 km), NH 107 essentially exists as a series of smaller segments connected by short concurrencies with other routes.

NH 107 between US 3 and Leavitt Road in Laconia is part of the Timberman 70.3 Triathlon bicycle course.

New Hampshire Route 111

New Hampshire Route 111 (abbreviated NH 111) is a 50.027-mile-long (80.511 km) east–west highway in Hillsborough and Rockingham counties in southeastern New Hampshire. The road runs from the Massachusetts border at Hollis to North Hampton on the Atlantic shore.

The western terminus of NH 111 is at the Massachusetts state line in Hollis, where, as Massachusetts Route 111 (Nashua Road), the road continues into the town of Pepperell, Massachusetts. The eastern terminus of NH 111 is at the junction with Ocean Boulevard (New Hampshire Route 1A) in North Hampton. At its terminus, the road is known as Atlantic Avenue.

Sandown, New Hampshire

Sandown is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 5,986 at the 2010 census.

Squamscott River

The Squamscott River is a 6-mile-long (9.7 km) tidal river in Rockingham County, southeastern New Hampshire, in the United States. It rises at Exeter, fed by the Exeter River. The Squamscott runs north between Newfields and Stratham to Great Bay, a tidal estuary, which is connected to the Piscataqua River, a tidal inlet of the Atlantic Ocean.

More specifically, after rising at the Great Bridge (actually a very modest Works Progress Administration project) adjacent to the former "Loaf & Ladle" restaurant in downtown Exeter, the Squamscott River passes the "Wooden Wave" (an interesting architectural statement next to the Phillips Exeter Academy boathouse), then tends north alongside the Swasey Parkway, through the haymarshes, passing by the town's water purification plant and then under State Route 101, a major east-west arterial road in New Hampshire. The river next passes under Route 108 at the site of the former "Singing Bridge", a metal bridge which was recently replaced. The river then debouches into Great Bay, a broad and shallow tidal estuary, just south of the mouth of the Lamprey River, arriving at the bay from Newmarket.

The Squamscott, also spelled Swampscott and Swamscott, gets its name from the Squamscott Indians who called it Msquam-s-kook (or Msquamskek) translated as 'at the salmon place' or 'big water place.' Plentiful game, the marshes and lush river-fed vegetation, and an abundance of fish supported the northeast Native American Indians who were present in the region for thousands of years until English settlers displaced them in the early 17th century. The Native American tribes of New Hampshire were most likely from the Abenaki nation, but independent of the Maine-based tribes. The name “Abenaki” and its derivatives originated from a Montagnais (Algonquin) word meaning "people of the dawn" or "easterners". In the eastern part of New Hampshire were the Pequaquaukes (or Pequakets), the Ossipees, the Minnecometts, the Piscataquas and the Squamscotts (Msquamskek).

The Phillips Exeter Academy crew team holds its practices on the Squamscott River in Exeter.

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