Executive producer

Executive producer (EP) is one of the top positions in the making of a commercial entertainment product. Depending on the medium, the executive producer may be concerned with management accounting or associated with legal issues (like copyrights or royalties).[1] In films, the executive producer generally contributes to the film's budget and usually does not work on set, in contrast to most other producers.[2]

Motion pictures

In films, executive producers finance the film or participate in the creative effort, but do not work on the set. Their responsibilities vary from funding or attracting investors into the movie project to legal, scripting, marketing, advisory and supervising capacities.[3]

The crediting of executive producers in the film industry has risen over time. In the mid-to-late 1990s, there were an average of just under two executive producers per film. In 2000, the number jumped to 2.5 (more than the number of standard "producers"). In 2013, there were an average of 4.4 executive producers per film, compared with 3.2 producers.[4]

Television

In television, an executive producer usually supervises the creative content and the financial aspects of a production. Some writers, like Stephen J. Cannell, Tina Fey, and Ryan Murphy, have worked as both the creator and the producer of the same TV show.[5] In case of multiple executive producers on a TV show, the one outranking the others is called the showrunner,[6] or the leading executive producer.

Music

In recorded music, record labels distinguish between an executive producer and a record producer. The executive producer is responsible for business decisions and more recently, organizing the recordings along with the music producer, whereas the record producer produces the music. Sometimes the executive producer organises the recording and selects recording-related crew, such as sound engineers and session musicians.[7]

Video games

In the video game industry, the title "executive producer" is not well-defined. It may refer to an external producer working for the publisher, who works with the developers.

For example, in 2012, Jay-Z was announced as executive producer for NBA 2K13. His role consisted of appearing in an introduction, picking songs for the game's soundtrack and contributing to the design of its in-game menus "and other visual elements".[8][9]

Radio

An executive radio producer helps create, develop, and implement strategies to improve product and ratings.[10]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Typically an executive producer may handle business and legal issues". Retrieved March 10, 2013.
  2. ^ "What is an Executive Producer?". WiseGEEK. Retrieved 2014-01-21.
  3. ^ "Executive Producer (aka Executive in Charge of Production)". Retrieved January 12, 2017.
  4. ^ "How many movie producers does a film need?". Retrieved 2016-05-04.
  5. ^ "In television, an Executive Producer may also be the Creator/Writer of a series". Retrieved March 12, 2013.
  6. ^ "There can be multiple executive producers on a series, but the one in charge is called the showrunner". Retrieved March 10, 2013.
  7. ^ "The executive producer usually chooses the musicians and technicians for a record, decides where and when to record, and the production budget and timetable". Archived from the original on 10 April 2013. Retrieved 12 March 2013.
  8. ^ "Argent said Jay-Z's influence would be felt immediately in the game, starting during its video introduction. Jay-Z also handpicked the game's soundtrack". CNN. 1 August 2012. Retrieved August 1, 2012.
  9. ^ "Jay-Z NBA 2K13: Rapper Announced As 'Executive Producer'". Retrieved August 2, 2012.
  10. ^ "Executive Producer | Radio & Television Business Report". www.rbr.com. Retrieved 2018-03-25.

External links

Amy Poehler

Amy Meredith Poehler (; born September 16, 1971) is an American actress, comedian, director, producer, and writer. After studying improv at Chicago's Second City and ImprovOlympic in the early 1990s, she Co-founded the Chicago-based improvisational-comedy troupe, Upright Citizens Brigade. The group moved to New York City in 1996 where their act became a half-hour sketch comedy series on Comedy Central in 1998. Along with other members of the comedy group, Poehler is a founder of the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre.She is best known for starring as Leslie Knope in the NBC sitcom Parks and Recreation, for which she won a Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Television Musical or Comedy Series in 2014 and a Critics' Choice Award for Best Actress in a Comedy Series in 2012. Poehler was a cast member on the NBC television series Saturday Night Live from 2001 to 2008 and became co-anchor of SNL's Weekend Update in 2004 alongside friend and colleague Tina Fey. She is also known for voicing Joy from Inside Out, Sally O'Malley from the Horton Hears a Who! movie adaptation, Bessie Higgenbottom from the Nickelodeon series, The Mighty B! from 2008-2010, and Homily Clock from the American-English dub of The Secret World of Arrietty.

Poehler served as an executive producer on the Swedish-American sitcom Welcome to Sweden, along with her brother Greg Poehler. She is also an executive producer on Broad City which airs on Comedy Central, and appeared in the season one finale. For its three season run from 2015 to 2017, she has served as an executive producer on the Hulu series Difficult People. In December 2015, Poehler received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for her contributions in television. She and Tina Fey both won the 2016 Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series for Saturday Night Live. Currently, Poehler is credited as a writer and executive producer of the Netflix comedy series, Russian Doll, which was co-created with Natasha Lyonne and Leslye Headland. The series premiered on February 1, 2019.

Dan Schneider (TV producer)

Dan Schneider (born 1965/1966) is an American actor, television and film writer, and producer. After appearing in mostly supporting roles in a number of 1980s and 1990s films and TV shows, Schneider devoted himself to behind-the-scenes work in production. He is the co-president of television production company Schneider's Bakery and made What I Like About You for The WB and All That, The Amanda Show, Drake & Josh, Zoey 101, iCarly, Victorious, Sam & Cat, Henry Danger, Game Shakers, and The Adventures of Kid Danger for Nickelodeon.

Jimmy Iovine

James Iovine (; Italian: [ˈjoːvine]; born March 11, 1953) is an American record producer best known as the co-founder of Interscope Records. In 2006, Iovine and rapper-producer Dr. Dre founded Beats Electronics, which produces audio products and operated a now-defunct music streaming service. The company was purchased by Apple Inc. for $3 billion in May 2014.Prior to the Apple acquisition of Beats in 2014, Iovine became chairman of Interscope-Geffen-A&M, an umbrella unit merged by the then-newly-reincarnated Universal Music Group in 1999.

John Lasseter

John Alan Lasseter (; born January 12, 1957) is an American animator, filmmaker and former chief creative officer of Walt Disney Animation Studios, Pixar and the defunct Disneytoon Studios. He was also the Principal Creative Advisor for Walt Disney Imagineering.Lasseter began his career as an animator with The Walt Disney Company. After being fired from Disney for promoting computer animation, he joined Lucasfilm, where he worked on the then-groundbreaking use of CGI animation. The Graphics Group of the Computer Division of Lucasfilm was sold to Steve Jobs and became Pixar in 1986. Lasseter oversaw all of Pixar's films and associated projects as executive producer. In addition, he directed Toy Story (1995), A Bug's Life (1998), Toy Story 2 (1999), Cars (2006), and Cars 2 (2011). From 2006 to 2018, Lasseter also oversaw all of Walt Disney Animation Studios' (and its division Disneytoon Studios') films and associated projects as executive producer.

The films he has made have grossed more than $19 billion (USD), making him one of the most successful filmmakers of all time. Of the seven animated films that have grossed more than $1 billion, five of them are films executive produced by Lasseter. The films include Toy Story 3 (2010), the first animated film to pass $1 billion, Frozen (2013), the current highest-grossing animated film of all time, as well as Zootopia (2016), Finding Dory (2016) and Incredibles 2 (2018).

He has won two Academy Awards, for Best Animated Short Film (for Tin Toy), as well as a Special Achievement Award (for Toy Story).In November 2017, Lasseter took a six-month sabbatical from Pixar and Disney Animation after acknowledging "missteps" in his behavior with employees. According to various news outlets, Lasseter had a history of alleged sexual misconduct towards employees. In June 2018, Disney announced that he would be leaving the company at the end of the year when his contract expired, but would take on a consulting role until then. On January 9, 2019, Lasseter was hired to head Skydance Animation.

Kathleen Kennedy (producer)

Kathleen Kennedy (born June 5, 1953) is an American film producer. In 1981, she co-founded the production company Amblin Entertainment with Steven Spielberg and husband Frank Marshall.

Her first film as a producer was E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982). She subsequently produced the Jurassic Park franchise, the first two of which became two of the top ten highest-grossing films of the 1990s. In 1992, she co-founded The Kennedy/Marshall Company with her husband Frank Marshall. On October 30, 2012, she became the president of Lucasfilm after The Walt Disney Company acquired the company for over $4 billion. She received the Irving G. Thalberg Award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 2018.Overall, Kennedy participated in the making of 60 films, mostly as executive producer, that garnered 8 Academy Award nominations and over $11 billion worldwide, including three of the highest-grossing films in motion picture history. Kennedy is second only to Spielberg in domestic box office receipts, with over $7 billion as of January 2018.

Lorne Michaels

Lorne Michaels (born Lorne David Lipowitz; November 17, 1944) is a Canadian-American television producer, writer, comedian, and actor, best known for creating and producing Saturday Night Live, and producing the Late Night series (since 1993), The Kids in the Hall (from 1989 to 1995) and The Tonight Show (since 2014).

Morgan Spurlock

Morgan Valentine Spurlock (born November 7, 1970) is an American documentary filmmaker, humorist, television producer, screenwriter, and playwright.

Spurlock's films include Super Size Me (2004), Where in the World Is Osama bin Laden? (2008), POM Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold (2011), Comic-Con Episode IV: A Fan's Hope (2011), and One Direction: This Is Us (2013). He was the executive producer and star of the reality television series 30 Days (2005-2008). In June 2013, Spurlock became host and producer of the CNN show Morgan Spurlock Inside Man (2013–2016). He is also the co-founder of short-film content marketing company Cinelan, which produced the Focus Forward campaign for GE.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series is an annual award given to the best television comedy series of the year. From 1960 to 1964, this category was combined with the Comedy Specials (one time programs) category so that both type of programs competed for the same award during those years.

The Flintstones and Family Guy are the only animated series to be nominated for the award.

Outside the Big Three networks (ABC, CBS and NBC), Fox has won this award twice, with Ally McBeal and Arrested Development, cable network HBO has won this award four times, one with Sex and the City and three times with Veep and streaming service Amazon Video once for The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series

This is a list of winners and nominees of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series, since its institution in 1951. The award is often cited as one of the "main awards" at the Emmys ceremonies and the final award presented at the ceremony, and has changed names many times in its history. It was first called Best Dramatic Show from 1951 to 1954, then Best Dramatic Series in 1955 and 1956. In 1957, no specific award for drama was given, but in 1958 the category was split into two separate categories, Best Dramatic Anthology Series, and Best Dramatic Series with Continuing Characters with a winner selected from each category. The following year, the category was differently split into two separate categories, Best Dramatic Series – Less Than One Hour. In 1960, the name was changed yet again to Outstanding Program Achievement in the Field of Drama; this name was kept from 1960 to 1964. In 1966, it had its sixth name change to Outstanding Dramatic Series or Outstanding Series-Drama; this was used from 1966 until recently, when it became Outstanding Drama Series.

In 1988, Rumpole of the Bailey (PBS) was initially nominated in the Outstanding Miniseries category but the Academy ruled that the nomination was not valid a few days later and later allowed the program to compete in the Outstanding Drama Series category.Since 2000, every single winner has been a serial drama: The West Wing (2000–2003), The Sopranos (2004, 2007), Lost (2005), 24 (2006), Mad Men (2008–2011), Homeland (2012), Breaking Bad (2013–2014), Game of Thrones (2015–2016, 2018), and The Handmaid's Tale (2017). Since the advent of Hill Street Blues in 1981, every winner has had some serialized arcs with the exception of Law & Order. The majority of these shows have won between their first and fifth seasons. Only two shows have won on their sixth season, Game of Thrones and The Sopranos, and two on its seventh, Law & Order and Game of Thrones.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Limited Series

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Limited Series represents excellence in the category of limited series that are two or more episodes with a total running time of at least 150 minutes. The program must tell a complete, non-recurring story, and not have an ongoing storyline or main characters in subsequent seasons.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Variety Series

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Variety Series was a category in the Primetime Emmy Awards. It was awarded annually to the best variety show or similarly formatted program of the year. The award was sometimes known by other names, such as “Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Program” and “Outstanding Variety, Music, or Comedy Series.”

From 1979 to 1989 and in 1991, variety series and specials competed together. Single programs dominated as winners during this time until the Outstanding Variety Special category was formed. Since 1994, all of the winners in this category have been late-night talk shows.

The Daily Show with Jon Stewart won the award for ten years consecutively (2003–2012), the longest winning streak for a television show in Primetime Emmy Award history. In 2015, this category was separated into two categories – Outstanding Variety Sketch Series and Outstanding Variety Talk Series.

Ron Howard

Ronald William Howard (born March 1, 1954) is an American filmmaker and actor. Howard is best known for playing two high-profile roles in television sitcoms in his youth and directing a number of successful feature films later in his career.

Howard first came to prominence playing young Opie Taylor, the son of Sheriff Andy Taylor (played by Andy Griffith), in the sitcom The Andy Griffith Show from 1960 through 1968. During this time, he also appeared in the musical film The Music Man (1962) and the comedy film The Courtship of Eddie's Father (1963). In 1973, he played Steve Bolander in the classic coming of age film American Graffiti (1973). In 1974, Howard became a household name playing teenager Richie Cunningham in the sitcom Happy Days, continuing in the role for seven years. Howard continued making films during this time, appearing in the western film The Shootist (1976) and the comedy film Grand Theft Auto (1977), which he also directed.

In 1980, Howard left Happy Days to focus on directing. His films include the science-fiction/fantasy film Cocoon (1985), the historical docudrama Apollo 13 (1995) (earning him the Directors Guild of America award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Motion Pictures), the biographical drama A Beautiful Mind (2001) (earning him the Academy Award for Best Director and Academy Award for Best Picture), the thriller The Da Vinci Code (2006), the historical drama Frost/Nixon (2008) (nominated for Best Director and Best Picture Academy Awards) and Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018).

Since 2003, Howard has narrated the Fox (later Netflix) comedy series Arrested Development, on which he also served as an executive producer and played a semi-fictionalized version of himself.

In 2003, Howard was awarded the National Medal of Arts. Asteroid 12561 Howard is named after him. He was inducted into the Television Hall of Fame in 2013. Howard has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his contributions in the television and motion pictures industries.

Ryan Murphy (writer)

Ryan Patrick Murphy (born November 9, 1965) is an American screenwriter, director, and producer. Murphy is best known for creating/co-creating/producing a number of successful television series, including the FX medical drama Nip/Tuck (2003–10), the Fox musical comedy-drama Glee (2009–15), the FX anthology series American Horror Story (2011–present), American Crime Story (2016–present), and Feud (2017–present), and the Fox procedural drama 9-1-1 (2018–present). He is also known for directing the 2010 film adaptation of Elizabeth Gilbert's best-selling memoir Eat, Pray, Love and the 2014 HBO film adaptation of Larry Kramer's The Normal Heart, which earned a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Television Movie.

Ryan Seacrest

Ryan John Seacrest (born December 24, 1974) is an American radio personality, television host, and producer. Seacrest is known for hosting the competition show American Idol, the syndicated countdown program American Top 40, and iHeartMedia's KIIS-FM morning radio show On Air with Ryan Seacrest.In 2006 Seacrest became co-host and executive producer of Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve. Seacrest remained a co-host and executive producer following Clark's death in 2012.He began co-hosting Live with Kelly and Ryan on a permanent basis May 1, 2017.Seacrest received Emmy Award nominations for American Idol from 2004 to 2013, and again in 2016. He won an Emmy for producing Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution in 2010 and was nominated again in 2012. In 2018, Seacrest received nominations for Live with Kelly and Ryan in Outstanding Talk Show Entertainment as well as Outstanding Entertainment Talk Show Host.

Showrunner

Showrunner is the 21st-century term for the leading executive producer of a Hollywood television series in the United States, and are credited as simply producer in other countries, such as Canada or Britain. A showrunner has creative and management responsibility of a television series production, typically through combining the responsibilities of employer, head writer, and script editor. In films, directors have creative control of a production, but in television, the showrunner outranks the director.

Ted Field

Frederick Woodruff "Ted" Field (born June 1, 1953) is an American media mogul, entrepreneur and film producer.

He is an heir to the Field family fortune. At $1.2 billion, Field is No. 236 on the Forbes list of the 400 richest people.

Television producer

A television producer is a person who oversees all aspects of video production on a television program. Some producers take more of an executive role, in that they conceive new programs and pitch them to the television networks, but upon acceptance they focus on business matters, such as budgets and contracts. Other producers are more involved with the day-to-day workings, participating in activities such as screenwriting, set design, casting and directing.

There is a variety of different producers on a television show. A traditional producer is one who manages a show's budget and maintains a schedule, but this is no longer the case in modern television.

The Young and the Restless

The Young and the Restless (often abbreviated as Y&R) is an American television soap opera created by William J. Bell and Lee Phillip Bell for CBS. The show is set in a fictionalized version of Genoa City, Wisconsin. First broadcast on March 26, 1973, The Young and the Restless was originally broadcast as half-hour episodes, five times a week. The show expanded to one-hour episodes on February 4, 1980. In 2006, the series began airing encore episodes weeknights on SOAPnet until 2013, when it moved to TVGN (now Pop). As of July 1, 2013, Pop still airs the encore episodes on weeknights. The series is also syndicated internationally.The Young and the Restless originally focused on two core families: the wealthy Brooks family and the working class Foster family. After a series of recasts and departures in the early 1980s, all the original characters except Jill Foster were written out. Bell replaced them with new core families, the Abbotts and the Williamses. Over the years, other families such as the Newmans, the Barber-Winters, and the Baldwin-Fishers were introduced. Despite these changes, one storyline that has endured through almost the show's entire run is the feud between Jill Abbott and Katherine Chancellor, the longest rivalry on any American soap opera.Since its debut, The Young and the Restless has won nine Daytime Emmy Awards for Outstanding Drama Series. It is also currently the highest-rated daytime drama on American television. As of 2008, it had appeared at the top of the weekly Nielsen ratings in that category for more than 1,000 weeks since 1988. As of December 12, 2013, according to Nielsen ratings, The Young and the Restless was the leading daytime drama for an unprecedented 1,300 weeks, or 25 years. The serial is also a sister series to The Bold and the Beautiful, as several actors have crossed over between shows. In June 2017, The Young and the Restless was renewed for three additional years.

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