Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull

Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull KG PC (c. 1655 – 5 March 1726) was an English aristocrat.


The Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull

1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull
Lord President of the Council
In office
6 February 1719 – 11 June 1720
MonarchGeorge I
Preceded byThe Earl of Sunderland
Succeeded byViscount Townshend
PierrepontArms
Arms of Pierrepont: Argent semée of cinquefoils gules, a lion rampant sable

Political career

He had been the member of parliament for East Retford before his accession to the peerage as fifth Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull in 1690.[1][2] While serving as one of the commissioners for the union with Scotland he was created Marquess of Dorchester in 1706, and took a leading part in the business of the House of Lords. He was made a privy councillor and in 1715 was created Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull; afterwards serving as Lord Privy Seal and Lord President of the Council. The Duke was a prominent figure in the fashionable society of his day.[3]

Family

His first wife was Lady Mary Feilding, a daughter of William Feilding, 3rd Earl of Denbigh and his wife Mary King, whom he married in 1687. They had five daughters and a son, among whom were:[4]

His second wife was Lady Isabella Bentinck, daughter of Hans William Bentinck, 1st Earl of Portland, whom he married in 1714.

He was succeeded by his grandson Evelyn, son of William.

Ancestral link with Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge

It was reported in July 2013 that Phillip Medows, the husband of Lady Frances Pierrepont (died 1795) (the daughter of William, Earl of Kingston (died 1713)) was the great grandson of Daniel Meadows (1577-1659), the direct ancestor of Michael Francis Middleton, father of Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge.[5][6][7][8]

References

  1. ^ "Pierrepont, Evelyn (1665?-1726)" . Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.
  2. ^ "''Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull'' at Special Collections of ''The University of Nottingham''". Nottingham.ac.uk. Retrieved 28 January 2012.
  3. ^  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Kingston-upon-Hull, Earls and Dukes of" . Encyclopædia Britannica. 15 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 822.
  4. ^ "''William Pierrepont, Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull (1692-1713)'' at Special Collections of ''The University of Nottingham''". Nottingham.ac.uk. Retrieved 28 January 2012.
  5. ^ Wilson, Chistopher. "The Middletons deserve a title - step forward, the Earl and Countess of Fairfax". UK Daily Telegraph 26 July 2013. Retrieved 6 March 2016. Michael Middleton’s eighth generation (thus Catherine's ninth) great grandfather, Daniel Meadows, was born in Suffolk in 1577. Through his direct male line, the Manvers earldom was granted in 1806 to his great great-grandson Charles Medows, whose mother, Lady Frances Medows née Pierrepont (died 1795) was the daughter of William, Earl of Kingston (died 1713), himself the son of the first Duke of Kingston - Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-Upon-Hull...
  6. ^ "Ancestry of Kate Middleton". wargs.com. Retrieved 6 March 2016.
  7. ^ Bell, J. "Belle Assemblée: Or, Court and Fashionable Magazine; Containing Interesting and Original Literature, and Records of the Beau-monde (Illustrative Memoirs of the Countess Manvers)". Geo. B. Whittaker, London 1827 - Page 49. Retrieved 6 March 2016.
  8. ^ "Ancestry of Kate Middleton". wargs.com. Retrieved 6 March 2016. Daniel Meadows (1577-1659) m. Elizabeth Smith
    .Sir Philip Medows m. Constance Lucy
     .Sir Philip Medows m. Dorothy Boscawen
      .Philip Medows m. Frances Pierrepont
       .CHARLES MEDOWS PIERREPONT, 1st Earl MANVERS (1737-1816)
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Viscount Weymouth
Custos Rotulorum of Wiltshire
1706–1711
Succeeded by
The Viscount Weymouth
Preceded by
The Viscount Weymouth
Custos Rotulorum of Wiltshire
1714–1726
Succeeded by
Earl of Hertford
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Sir Edward Nevill
John Millington
Member of Parliament for East Retford
1689–1690
With: John Thornhagh
Succeeded by
John Thornhagh
Richard Taylor
Legal offices
Preceded by
The Duke of Leeds
Justice in Eyre
north of the Trent

1714–1717
Succeeded by
The Earl of Westmorland
Political offices
Preceded by
The Earl of Sunderland
Lord Privy Seal
1716–1719
Succeeded by
The Duke of Kent
Preceded by
The Earl of Sunderland
Lord President of the Council
1719–1720
Succeeded by
The Viscount Townshend
Preceded by
The Duke of Kent
Lord Privy Seal
1720–1726
Succeeded by
The Lord Trevor
Peerage of Great Britain
New creation Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull
1715–1726
Succeeded by
Evelyn Pierrepont
Peerage of England
New creation Marquess of Dorchester
2nd creation
1706–1726
Succeeded by
Evelyn Pierrepont
Preceded by
William Pierrepont
Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull
1690–1726
1726 in Great Britain

Events from the year 1726 in Great Britain.

Baron Pierrepont

Baron Pierrepont is a title that has been created four times in British history. The first creation came in the Peerage of England on 29 June 1627 when Sir Robert Pierrepont was created Baron Pierrepont, also being created Viscount Newark at the same time. He was further created Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull in 1628. The fifth Earl was created Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull in 1715 in the Peerage of Great Britain, with the Dukedom becoming extinct on the death of the second Duke in 1773.

The second creation came in the Peerage of Ireland on 29 March 1702 when Gervase Pierrepont was created Baron Pierrepont, of Ardglass, County Down. On 19 October 1714 he was also made Baron Pierrepont, of Hanslope in the County of Buckingham, in the Peerage of Great Britain, being the third creation of the title, with this creation giving Gervase Pierrepont an automatic seat in the House of Lords. He was the third son of the Honourable William Pierrepont, second son of Robert Pierrepont, 1st Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull. The titles became extinct on his death on 22 May 1715.

The fourth creation came in the Peerage of Great Britain on 23 July 1796 when Charles Pierrepont was made Baron Pierrepont, of Holme Pierrepont in the County of Nottingham. He was made Viscount Newark, of Newark on Trent, at the same time. Born Charles Medows, he was the son of Philip Medows and Lady Frances, daughter of William Pierrepont, Earl of Kingston, eldest son and heir apparent of Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull. In 1788 he succeeded to the Pierrepont estates and assumed by Royal sign manual the same year the surname of Pierrepont in lieu of Medows. In 1806 he was further honoured when he was created Earl Manvers. All these titles became extinct on the death of the sixth Earl Manvers in 1955.

Charles Pierrepont, 1st Earl Manvers

Charles (Medows) Pierrepont, 1st Earl Manvers (4 November 1737 – 17 June 1816) was a British naval officer and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1778 to 1796 when he was raised to the peerage as Viscount Newark.

Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull

Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull was a title in the Peerage of Great Britain, with the title Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull being a title in the Peerage of England. The Earldom was created on 25 July 1628 for Robert Pierrepont, 1st Viscount Newark. The Dukedom was created on 10 August 1715 for his great-grandson, Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Marquess of Dorchester, who had succeeded as the fifth Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull in 1690. The Dukedom became extinct on the death of the second Duke in 1773. These titles are often informally shortened to the Duke (or Earl) of Kingston, and should not be confused with the separate Irish title, Earl of Kingston.

Earl Manvers

Earl Manvers was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1806 for Charles Medows Pierrepont, 1st Viscount Newark. He had already been created Baron Pierrepont, of Holme Pierrepont in the County of Nottingham, and Viscount Newark, of Newark-on-Trent in the County of Nottingham, in 1796. Both these titles were in the Peerage of Great Britain. Born Charles Medows, he was the second son of Philip Medows, Deputy Ranger of Richmond Park, by Lady Frances Pierrepont, daughter of William Pierrepont, Earl of Kingston (1692–1713), eldest son and heir apparent of Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull.

In 1788 Charles Medows had succeeded to the Pierrepont estates on the death of the second Duke's wife, and assumed the same year by Royal sign manual the surname of Pierrepont in lieu of Medows. Manvers's eldest son Evelyn Pierrepont predeceased him and he was succeeded by his second son Charles, the second Earl. He was a naval commander and Member of Parliament. He was succeeded by his second and only surviving son, Sydney, the third Earl. He represented Nottinghamshire South in Parliament. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Charles, the fourth Earl. He sat as Conservative Member of Parliament for Newark. On his death the titles passed to his only son Evelyn, the fifth Earl. He suffered a mental breakdown at the age of 17 and never married.

The fifth Earl was succeeded by his cousin Gervas Pierrepont, the sixth and last Earl. He was the only son of the Hon Evelyn Henry Pierrepont (1856–1926), second son of the third Earl. The sixth Earl's only son died as a child and the Earldom and subsidiary titles became extinct on the Earl's death in 1955.

Other members of the family may also be mentioned. Edward Medows (died 1813), brother of the first Earl, was a Captain in the Royal Navy. Sir William Medows, brother of the first Earl, was a General in the British Army. The Honourable Henry Pierrepont, third son of the first Earl, was a diplomat.

The ancestral seat of the Earls Manvers was Thoresby Hall, near Ollerton, Nottinghamshire. The hall itself, built in the 1860s by the third Earl to the designs of Anthony Salvin was the 3rd building on the site replacing a smaller Georgian house which in turn had replaced a large Baroque house designed by Talman which had burned down. It remained the home of the last Countess Manvers until her death aged 95 in 1984 and was subsequently sold by the family and is now a hotel and conference venue. The Thoresby wider agricultural and forestry estate remains with the descendents of the Pierreponts and they have built a new Country House elsewhere on the Estate.

A comprehensive school named after him – Manvers Pierrepont Comprehensive, Carlton Road, Nottingham. The school site still exists but rationalisation transformed it to a College of Further Education.

Edward Wortley Montagu (diplomat)

Sir Edward Wortley-Montagu (8 February 1678 – 22 January 1761) was British Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire, husband of the writer Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and father of the writer and traveller Edward Wortley Montagu.

Son of Sidney Wortley Montagu and grandson of Edward Montagu, 1st Earl of Sandwich, Wortley Montagu was educated at Westminster School, Trinity College, Cambridge (1693) and trained in the law at the Middle Temple (1693), was called to the bar in 1699 and entered the Inner Temple in 1706.

He was best known for his correspondence with, seduction of, and elopement with the aristocratic writer, Mary, daughter of Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull. They married in 1712. He succeeded his father in 1727, inheriting Wortley Hall, near Barnsley in South Yorkshire.

Montagu himself was a prominent Whig politician, and was MP for Huntingdon before eventually becoming a Lord Commissioner of the Treasury from 1714 to 1715.

He made Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire and elected the representative of the Levant Company on the king's nomination on 10 May 1716. He arrived with his wife at Adrianople (now known as Edirne) on 13 March 1717. As Ambassador, he was charged with pursuing the ongoing negotiations between the Ottomans and the Habsburg Empire. Unsuccessful in the position he was not made Ambassador to the Ottoman Porte in Constantinople before he was recalled in October 1717. He left Turkey on 15 July 1718 and, for some time traveled in the East. Upon his return to England from Constantinople, he fell out with the Whig hierarchy but remained a Member of Parliament for Huntingdon (1722–1734) and Peterborough (1734 until his death in 1761).

From 1757 to 1761 he remodelled Wortley hall, adding the East Wing. On his death he left the hall and a large fortune to his daughter Mary, having in 1755 cut off his son Edward with only a small allowance. Mary married the future Prime Minister, John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute.

Evelyn Pierrepont

Evelyn Pierrepont may refer to:

Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull (c.1655–1726)

Evelyn Pierrepont, 2nd Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull (1711–1773)

Evelyn Pierrepont (MP) (1775–1801)

Evelyn Pierrepont, 5th Earl Manvers (1888–1940)

Evelyn Pierrepont, 2nd Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull

General Evelyn Pierrepont, 2nd Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull, KG (1711 – 23 September 1773) was an English nobleman and landowner, a member of the House of Lords. He was the only son of William Pierrepont, Earl of Kingston (1692–1713) and his wife, Rachel Bayntun (1695–1722).

His paternal grandparents were Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull and his wife Mary Feilding, a daughter of William Feilding, 3rd Earl of Denbigh, while his maternal grandparents were Elizabeth Willoughby and her husband Thomas Bayntun of Little Chalfield, Wiltshire, or else her lover John Hall of Bradford-on-Avon. He succeeded his grandfather in 1726, inheriting the Thoresby estate in Nottinghamshire.

When the Jacobite rising of 1745 broke out he raised a regiment called "Kingston's light horse," which distinguished itself at the Battle of Culloden. The duke attained the rank of general in the army.Pierrepont was the subject of the earliest extant reference to cricket in Nottinghamshire. A letter dated 1751 comments that: "the Duke of Kingston at Thoresby Hall is spending all his time practising cricket because he is to play for Eton v All England in three matches".On 8 March 1769, Pierrepont married Elizabeth Hervey at Keith's Chapel in the parish of St George's, Hanover Square, Westminster, although their marriage was later alleged to have been bigamous. He died in 1773 without issue, and Pierrepont's titles became extinct. On the death of the Duchess in 1788, the Pierrepont estates passed to Charles Medows, who was the son of the 2nd Duke's sister, Lady Frances Medows. Charles Medows changed his name to Pierrepont in 1796 and, in 1806, he was created the first Earl Manvers.

George Waldegrave, 5th Earl Waldegrave

George Waldegrave, 5th Earl Wadegrave (13 July 1784–29 June 1794) was the son of the 4th Earl Waldegrave and his wife, Elizabeth Waldegrave, Countess Waldegrave.

Upon his father's death in 1789, he inherited his titles at the age of five but drowned whilst swimming in the River Thames near Eton in 1794, a week before his tenth birthday. His titles then passed to his brother, John.

Gervase Pierrepont, 1st Baron Pierrepont

Gervase Pierrepont, 1st Baron Pierrepont (1649 – 22 May 1715), was an English politician.

Pierrepont was the younger son of William Pierrepont, second son of Robert Pierrepont, 1st Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull. His mother was Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Thomas Harries, 1st Baronet, of Tong Castle, Shropshire. He was the uncle of Robert Pierrepont, 3rd Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull, William Pierrepont, 4th Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull, and Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull.

Pierrepont was returned to Parliament as one of two representatives for Appleby in 1698, a seat he held until 1705. In 1702 he was raised to the Peerage of Ireland as Baron Pierrepont, of Ardglass. This creation in the Peerage of Ireland allowed him to be ennobled, yet still remain in the House of Commons. In 1714 he was further honoured when he was made Baron Pierrepont, of Hanslape in the County of Buckingham, in the Peerage of Great Britain, with this creation giving him an automatic seat in the House of Lords.

Lord Pierrepont married Lucy Pelham, daughter of Sir John Pelham, 3rd Baronet, in 1680. He died in May 1715 when the baronies became extinct. Lady Pierrepont died in July 1721.

John Evelyn (Parliamentarian)

Sir John Evelyn (11 August 1601 – 26 June 1685) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons variously between 1626 and 1660.

Evelyn was the son of George Evelyn of West Dean, one of the Six Clerks in Chancery, and his wife Elizabeth Rivers, daughter of Sir John Rivers of Chafford, Kent. He was a cousin of the diarist John Evelyn, and nephew of another John Evelyn (1591–1664), of Godstone in Surrey, who served as MP for nearby Bletchingley in 1628, 1640 and 1660.In 1626, Evelyn was elected Member of Parliament for Wilton. He became a JP for Wiltshire in 1637. In April 1640, he was elected Member of Parliament for Ludgershall in the Short Parliament, and was re-elected MP for Ludgershall in the Long Parliament in November 1640. He became a JP for Hampshire in 1641. He was a commissioner for Westminster Assembly, a commissioner for assessment for Wiltshire and a commissioner for levying of money in 1643. In 1645 he became a commissioner for the execution of ordinances in Hampshire, a commissioner for the New Model Army and then for the Admiralty. He was also commissioner for propositions for the relief of Ireland. In 1646 he was governor of the Covent Garden precinct and commissioner for abuses in heraldry and for exclusion from sacrament and for bishops lands. In 1648 he was a member of the committee of both kingdoms. He abstained from the House of Commons after Pride's Purge.In 1660 Evelyn was Councillor of State. He was re-elected at Ludgershall in 1660 for the Convention Parliament but this was a double return and he sat instead for Stockbridge.Evelyn died at the age of 84 and left his estate to one daughter, the mother of Evelyn Pierrepont, while cutting Sarah, the other daughter, off with five shillings because of her marriage to George Saunderson, 5th Viscount Castleton.Evelyn married Elizabeth Coxe, daughter of Robert Coxe, grocer of London.

By her, Sir John had:

Elizabeth Evelyn, who married Robert Pierrepont, by whom she had Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull

Sarah Evelyn, who married first Sir John Wray, 3rd Baronet, Lord Thomas Fanshawe, 2nd Viscount Fanshawe second, and Lord George Saunderson, 5th Viscount Castleton third.

John Leveson-Gower, 1st Earl Gower

John Leveson-Gower, 1st Earl Gower (10 August 1694 – 25 December 1754), known as The Baron Gower from 1709 to 1746, was a British Tory politician from the Leveson-Gower family, one of the first Tories to enter government after the Hanoverian Succession.

Lords Justices appointed during the absence of King George I in 1719

The Lords Justices were appointed by George I while he was away, in Germany, in the capacity of Elector of Hanover.

William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury;

Thomas Pelham-Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle, Lord Chamberlain;

Thomas Parker, 1st Earl of Macclesfield, Lord Chancellor;

John Ker, 1st Duke of Roxburghe, Secretary of State for Scotland;

Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull, Lord President of the Council;

Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Kent, Lord Privy Seal;

James Craggs the Younger, Secretary of State for the Southern Department.

Pierrepont

Pierrepont is the name or part of the name of several communes in France:

Pierrepont, Aisne, in the Aisne département

Pierrepont, Calvados, in the Calvados département

Pierrepont, Meurthe-et-Moselle, in the Meurthe-et-Moselle département

Pierrepont-sur-Avre, in the Somme département

Pierrepont-sur-l'Arentèle, in the Vosges département

Recorder of Nottingham

The Recorder of Nottingham is the highest appointed legal officer of the Crown within the Nottingham City and Nottinghamshire County areas.

The current Recorder of Nottingham is His Honour Judge Gregory Dickinson QC, who was appointed in 2016.

Samuel Berdmore

Samuel Berdmore (before 1693 – 24 March 1742/3) was an English clergyman.

Berdmore was the fourth son of Edward Berdmore of Worcester. He was educated at Charterhouse School. He matriculated at Merton College, Oxford in 1693, and gained a BA in 1697 and an MA from King's College, Cambridge in 1706.

He became Vicar of St. Mary's Church, Nottingham, in 1708, Prebendary of Southwell in 1713, Rector of Lambley, in 1714, of St. Edmund's Church, Holme Pierrepont, in 1719, of Cotgrave, Nottinghamshire, in 1722 and a Canon of York in 1735. He held several of these posts at the same time, and was onetime Chaplain to Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull.

Thomas Brand (junior)

Thomas Brand (1749–1794) was an English country landowner of Kimpton, Hertfordshire and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1774 to 1780.

Brand was born on 17 September 1749, the eldest son of Thomas Brand of The Hoo, Kimpton, Hertfordshire and his wife Lady Caroline Pierrepont daughter of Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull. He was educated at Westminster School in 1764 and was admitted at Trinity College, Cambridge on 19 January1765. In August 1770 he succeeded his father to The Hoo. He married Gertrude Roper, daughter of Charles Roper on 20 April 1771. Brand’s estate extended into Cambridgeshire and he tried to enter Parliament in 1770 at Cambridgeshire in a by-election, but he was dismissed as an outsider, and withdrew before the poll, receiving £1,000 compensation from Sir Sampson Gideon, Bt. At the 1774 general election Brand was returned unopposed as Member of Parliament for Arundel on the interest of the Duke of Norfolk. There is no record of his having spoken in the House, and he did not stand in 1780. He stood for Cambridgeshire at a by-election in 1789 but there was such support for his opponent James Whorwood Adeane, that he withdrew before the poll.Brand died on 21 February 1794. His wife Gertrude succeeded her brother Trevor as Baroness Dacre on 4 July 1794 and was succeeded firstly by their eldest son son Thomas and then by their second son Henry Otway. They also had a daughter Gertrude.

Thomas Brand (senior)

Thomas Brand (senior) (c. 1717 – 1770), was an English country landowner of The Hoo, Kimpton, Hertfordshire and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1741 to 1770.

Brand was the only son of Thomas Brand and his wife Margaret Nicholl, daughter of John Nicholl of Chipping Barnet, Hertfordshire and Margaret Marsh ,heiress to a property known as Pricklers,in Chipping Barnet ,Hertfordshire (now known as Greenhill Gardens,East Barnet).

He was educated at Eton College (1728) and probably Queens’ College, Cambridge (1735). From 1739 to 1741 he undertook the Grand Tour of Europe.Brand was returned unopposed as Member of Parliament for New Shoreham in 1741 on the interest of John Phillipson. In 1747, he was returned as MP for Tavistock by his friend the Duke of Bedford. He became more closely connected with the Duke when he married Lady Caroline Pierrepont, the daughter of Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull who was an aunt of the Duke's wife. He was returned as MP for Gatton in 1754 and for Okehampton in 1768.Brand died in August 1770. He was succeeded by his only son Thomas who was also MP. He and his wife Caroline also had two daughters.

William Feilding, 3rd Earl of Denbigh

William Feilding, 3rd Earl of Denbigh, 2nd Earl of Desmond (29 December 1640 – 23 August 1685) was an aristocrat in the Peerage of England. He was the son of George Feilding, 1st Earl of Desmond, and his wife, the former Bridget Stanhope, daughter of Sir Michael Stanhope.Feilding inherited the title of Earl of Denbigh from his paternal uncle Basil Feilding, 2nd Earl of Denbigh, who died without heirs in 1675.He married, firstly, Mary King (died 1669), daughter of Sir Robert King and Frances Folliott. Secondly, he married Lady Mary Carey, daughter of Henry Carey, 2nd Earl of Monmouth. He died on 23 August 1685 at age 44.

By his first wife, Mary King, Feilding had the following children:

Lady Mary Feilding (c.1668 – c.December 1697), who married Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull, and had children.

Basil Feilding, 4th Earl of Denbigh (1668 – 18 March 1717), who married Hester Firebrace, and had childrenThere were no children from the earl's second marriage.

First Lord of the Treasury
Chancellor of the Exchequer
Leader of the House of Commons
Northern Secretary
Southern Secretary
Lord Chancellor
Lord President of the Council
Lord Privy Seal
First Lord of the Admiralty
Master-General of the Ordnance
Paymaster of the Forces
Lord Steward
Lord Chamberlain
Master of the Horse

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