Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council

The Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council (EAPC), a post-Cold War NATO institution, is a multilateral forum created to improve relations between NATO and non-NATO countries in Europe and those parts of Asia on the European periphery. States meet to cooperate and go to the range of political and security issues. It was formed on May 29, 1997 in the ministers meeting of Sintra, Portugal, as the successor to the North Atlantic Cooperation Council (NACC), which was created in 1991. It works alongside the Partnership for Peace (PfP), created in 1994.

Members

EAPC member states
Map of EAPC membership

There are 50 members, the 29 NATO member countries and 21 partner countries. The partner countries are: [1]

The USSR at the North Atlantic Cooperation Council

On 20 December 1991, the first meeting of the North Atlantic Cooperation Council, hosted a meeting between NATO, Eastern European nations and the USSR. Near the end of the meeting, the Soviet Ambassador received a message that concurrently to the meeting, the Soviet Union was dissolving and would cease to exist the following day. The Soviet Ambassador noted that as of then, he was only representing the Russian Federation and no longer the Soviet Union.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ "EAPC partner states".
  2. ^ "NATO Declassified - Dissolution of the Soviet Union announced at NATO meeting". Retrieved 28 March 2017.

External links

1990 London summit

The 1990 London summit was the 10th NATO summit since 1949, and the 4th in 6 years. It was held in London on 5–6 July 1990. The principal outcome of the summit was the London Declaration on a Transformed North Atlantic Alliance.The declaration, shaped in the midst of a changing Europe, called for substantial changes in the organization to ensure it could adapt to a rapidly evolving political landscape. Additionally, the declaration called for reductions in short-range nuclear capabilities, and re-focusing its long-term strategic plans with associated changes to the structure and quantity of its military.

Notably, the declaration also reinforced a message given days earlier stating that NATO no longer saw the Warsaw Pact countries as enemies, and opening up channels for communication and aid with the former eastern bloc states. NATO extended a "hand of friendship" to eastern European nations.One year later, on 20 December 1991, NATO and former members of the Warsaw Pact formed the North Atlantic Cooperation Council (NACC), now called the Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council.

1999 Washington summit

The 1999 Washington summit was the 16th NATO summit and was held in Washington, D.C. on April 24–25, 1999.Held at the height of the NATO bombing of Yugoslavia, the summit commemorated the fiftieth anniversary of NATO and reiterated the "determination to put an end to the repressive actions" by Serbian President Milošević against the local ethnic Albanian population in Kosovo. It was also the first summit in which three new NATO members (the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland) participated.

The Membership Action Plan, an important part of NATO's Open Door Policy was adopted and a revised version of the Strategic Concept was made public. The European Security and Defence Identity within NATO was also enhanced; the Defence Capabilities Initiative and the Weapons of Mass Destruction Initiative was launched; the Partnership for Peace, the Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council and the Mediterranean Dialogue was strengthened.

2004 Istanbul summit

The 2004 Istanbul summit was held in Istanbul, Turkey from June 28 to June 29, 2004. It was the 17th NATO summit in which NATO's Heads of State and Governments met to make formal decisions about security topics. In general, the summit is seen as a continuation of the transformation process that began in the 2002 Prague summit, which hoped to create a shift from a Cold War alliance against Soviet aggression to a 21st-century coalition against new and out-of-area security threats. The summit consisted of four meetings.

NATO members welcomed seven new alliance members during the North Atlantic Council meeting, decided to expand the alliance's presence in the War in Afghanistan and to end its presence in Bosnia, agreed to assist Iraq with training, launched a new partnership initiative and adopted measures to improve NATO's operational capabilities.The NATO-Russia Council meeting was mostly noted by the absence of both Russian president Vladimir Putin and of any progress concerning the ratification of the adapted CFE treaty or the withdrawal of Russian troops from Georgia and Moldova. NATO leaders further welcomed progress made by Ukraine towards membership in the NATO-Ukraine Commission meeting and discussed some general and mostly symbolic topics with its non-NATO counterparts during the Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council meeting.Due to Turkish government fears of a terrorist attack, security measures during the summit were tight. Demonstrators from around the world gathered to protest against NATO or the American foreign policy under the George W. Bush Administration, while the summit itself was blown off the front pages of the world press by the unexpected transfer of Iraqi sovereignty, coinciding with the first day of the NATO summit on June 28.

Cooperation Council

Cooperation Council may refer to:

Arab Cooperation Council, an international economic organization

Gulf Cooperation Council, a regional organization involving the six Persian Gulf Arab States

Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council, a NATO organisation

Pacific Economic Cooperation Council, a network of member committees composed of individuals and institutions

Croatia–United States relations

Croatia–United States relations refer to the bilateral relationship between Croatia and the United States. Diplomatic relations among two countries were established on April 7, 1992 following Croatia's independence from SFR Yugoslavia.

Croatia has an embassy in Washington, D.C., general consulates in Chicago, Los Angeles, New York City, and consulates in Anchorage, Kansas City metropolitan area, Pittsburgh, Seattle and Houston. The US has an embassy in Zagreb.American engagement in Croatia is aimed at fostering a democratic, secure, and market-oriented society that will be a strong US partner in Euro-Atlantic institutions. Bilateral relations between the two countries are described as very strong.Croatian diaspora in the US is one of the largest in the world with an estimate of more than 1.2 million members. Most of the Croats live in Chicago (~150,000), New York City, New Jersey and Connecticut (~80,000), St. Louis (~40,000), San Pedro (~35,000), Detroit (~7,000) and San Jose (~5,000). The National Federation of Croatian Americans is the main organization that brings together Croats in the US.Both countries are members of UN, NATO, Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council, Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, International Monetary Fund, World Bank and World Trade Organization. In addition, Croatia is an observer to the Organization of American States.

EAPC

EAPC may refer to:

Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council

European Association of Political Consultants

Escola d'Administració Pública de Catalunya, a public administration school in Spain

Eilat Ashkelon Pipeline Company

Eurasian Patent Convention

Evangelical Assembly of Presbyterian Churches

Foreign relations of NATO

NATO (the North Atlantic Treaty Organization) maintains foreign relations with many non-member countries across the globe. NATO runs a number of programs which provide a framework for the partnerships between itself and these non-member nations, typically based on that country's location. These include the Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council and the Partnership for Peace.

Foreign relations of Uzbekistan

Uzbekistan joined the Commonwealth of Independent States in December 1991. However, it is opposed to reintegration and withdrew from the CIS collective security arrangement in 1999. Since that time, Uzbekistan has participated in the CIS peacekeeping force in Tajikistan and in United Nations-organized groups to help resolve the Tajik and Afghan conflicts, both of which it sees as posing threats to its own stability. Uzbekistan is an active supporter of U.S. efforts against worldwide terrorism and joined the coalitions which have dealt with both Afghanistan and Iraq (although, in 2005, relations with the U.S. were strained after the May 2005 unrest and Uzbekistan demanded that the U.S. leave Karshi-Khanabad). It is a member of the United Nations, the Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council, Partnership for Peace, and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). It belongs to the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) and the Economic Cooperation Organization, which comprises 7 Central Asian countries: Pakistan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. It is a founding member of and remains involved in the Central Asian Union, formed with Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, joined in March 1998 by Tajikistan.

In 1999, Uzbekistan joined the GUAM alliance (Georgia, Ukraine, Azerbaijan and Moldova), which was formed in 1997 (temporarily making it GUUAM until Uzbekistan withdrew in 2005). Uzbekistan is also a member of the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) and hosts the SCO’s Regional Anti-Terrorist Structure (RATS) in Tashkent. Uzbekistan also joined the new Central Asian Cooperation Organization (CACO) in 2002. The CACO consists of Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan. It is a founding member of and remains involved in the Central Asian Union, formed with Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, joined in March 1998 by Tajikistan.

International organisation membership of Canada

These are international organizations of which Canada has membership

African Development Bank (nonregional member)

Agence de Coopération Culturelle et Technique

Arctic Council

Asean Regional Forum

ASEAN (dialogue partner)

Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation

Asian Development Bank (nonregional member)

Association of Southeast Asian Nations (dialogue partner)

Caribbean Development Bank

Commonwealth of Nations

Community of Democracies

Council of Europe (observer)

Democratic 10-D10

Diplomatic Forum

Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council

European Bank for Reconstruction and Development

European Space Agency (cooperating state)

Food and Agriculture Organization

OIF

G20

G-7

G8

G-10

IFC

Inter-American Development Bank

International Atomic Energy Agency

International Bank for Reconstruction and Development

International Civil Aviation Organization

International Criminal Court

International Development Association

International Energy Agency

International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

International Fund for Agricultural Development

International Hydrographic Organization

International Indigenous Affairs

International Labour Organization

International Maritime Organization

International Mobile Satellite Organization

International Monetary Fund

International Organization for Migration

International Organization for Standardization (ISO)

International Postal Union

International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement

International Telecommunication Union

International Telecommunications Satellite Organization

Interpol

La Francophonie

Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency

North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)

North Atlantic Treaty Organization

Nuclear Energy Agency

Nuclear Suppliers Group

Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe

Organization of American States

Pacific Islands Forum (partner)

Paris Club

Permanent Court of Arbitration

Southeast European Cooperative Initiative (observer)

UNESCO

United Nations Conference on Trade and Development

United Nations

Universal Postal Union

World Customs Organization

World Health Organization

World Intellectual Property Organization

World Meteorological Organization

World Tourism Organization

World Trade Organization

Zangger Committee

Humanitarian assistance

International organization membership of Uzbekistan

Uzbekistan is a member of the following international organizations:

United Nations

World Bank

Asian Development Bank (ADB)

European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD)

International Monetary Fund (IMF)

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council (EAPC)

Partnership for Peace (PfP)

Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE)

Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC)

Economic Cooperation Organization (ECO)

Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO)

Central Asian Cooperation Organization (CACO)

Central Asian Union

Eurasian Economic Community (EAEC) – suspended

International organization membership of the United States

The following is a list of international organizations in which the United States of America officially participates.

Asian Development Bank (ADB) (nonregional member)

Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC)

Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) (dialogue partner)

Australia Group

Australia-New Zealand-United States Security Treaty (ANZUS)

Bank for International Settlements (BIS)

Black Sea Economic Cooperation Zone (BSEC) (observer)

Colombo Plan (CP)

Council of Europe (CE) (observer)

Council of the Baltic Sea States (CBSS) (observer)

Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council (EAPC)

European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD)

European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) (observer)

Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA)

Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)

Group of Seven (G7)

Group of Eight (G8)

Group of Ten (G10)

Group of Twenty Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors (G20)

Inter-American Development Bank (IADB)

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD)

International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID)

International Chamber of Commerce (ICC)

International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)

International Criminal Police Organization (Interpol)

International Development Association (IDA)

International Energy Agency (IEA)

International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRCS)

International Finance Corporation (IFC)

International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)

International Hydrographic Organization (IHO)

International Labour Organization (ILO)

International Maritime Organization (IMO)

International Mobile Satellite Organization (IMSO)

International Monetary Fund (IMF)

International Olympic Committee (IOC)

International Organization for Migration (IOM)

International Organization for Standardization (ISO)

International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement (ICRM)

International Telecommunication Union (ITU)

International Telecommunications Satellite Organization (ITSO)

International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC)

Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA)

North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)

North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)

Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA)

Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG)

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE)

Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW)

Organization of American States (OAS)

Pacific Islands Forum (PIF) (partner)

Paris Club

Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA)

Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC)

South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) (observer)

Southeast European Cooperative Initiative (SECI) (observer)

United Nations (UN)

United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD)

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)

United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR)

United Nations Mission for Justice Support in Haiti (MINUJUSTH)

United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA)

United Nations Security Council (UNSC) (permanent member)

United Nations Truce Supervision Organization (UNTSO)

Universal Postal Union (UPU)

World Bank Group (WBG)

World Customs Organization (WCO)

World Health Organization (WHO)

World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO)

World Meteorological Organization (WMO)

World Organization of the Scout Movement (WOSM)

World Trade Organization (WTO)

World Veterans Federation (WVF)

Zangger Committee (ZC)

Ireland–NATO relations

Ireland and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization have had a formal relationship since 1999, when Ireland joined as a member of the NATO Partnership for Peace (PfP) programme and signed up to NATO's Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council (EAPC). To date, Ireland has not sought to join as a full NATO member due to its traditional policy of military neutrality.

Kairat Umarov

Kairat Umarov (born 12 January 1963) is a diplomat for the Republic of Kazakhstan. He was appointed to the post of Permanent Representative to the United Nations on 4 January 2016.Previously, Umarov served as Ambassador of the Republic of Kazakhstan to the United States from early 2013 to 4 January 2016. From 1998 to 2003, he served as Minister-Counselor at the Washington Embassy.Most recently, he was deputy foreign minister. As Ambassador, Umarov has emphasized cooperation with the U.S. in the areas of economic development and investment. He has met with civil society groups and discussed religious freedom in Kazakhstan and has served on panels in Washington, D.C. on Kazakhstan’s economic and political influence in the region.

Ambassador Umarov wrote an oped in US News & World Report making the case why Kazakhstan should serve as non-permanent member on the U.N. Security Council for 2017-2018.In support of Kazakhstan's selection to the UN Security Council, the Ambassador cites Kazakhstan's founding of the Conference on Interaction and Confidence Building Measures in Asia, membership in Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council and the Partnership for Peace, NATO cooperation, annual hosting of the Congress of Leaders of World and Traditional Religions, chairmanship of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, involvement in the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation, hosting P5+1 talks on Iran's nuclear program, establishing KazAID and the Green Bridge Partnership Program, and work to ensure water and energy security.Kairat Umarov also actively participated in establishing diplomatic relations with Belize. On 7 November 2013, Ambassador Umarov and U.S. Ambassador to Belize Nestor Mendez signed a joint communiqué on the establishment of diplomatic relations between the two countries.

Kazakhstan–Ukraine relations

Kazakhstan–Ukraine relations are foreign relations between Kazakhstan and Ukraine. Before 1918, both countries were part of the Russian Empire and until 1991 they were part of the USSR. Both countries established diplomatic relations in 1991. Kazakhstan has an embassy in Kiev and an honorary consulate in Odessa. Ukraine has an embassy in Astana and a consulate-general in Almaty.

There are between 895,000 and 2,400,000 ethnic Ukrainians living in Kazakhstan. Both countries are full members of TRACECA, of the Baku Initiative, of the Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council, Partnership for Peace and of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe. They are only 468 kilometres (291 mi) apart at their closest points.

Bilateral trade in 2012 between the two countries is according to officials more than doubled compared with 2010 and reached $4.4 billion.On 14 October 2013, Foreign Minister Erlan Idrisov met with Ukrainian Foreign Minister Leonid Kozhara. The two discussed furthering bilateral cooperations amongst the two nations. Also, Ukraine holds the seat for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) and shared what they can learn from Kazakhstan when they held the seat in 2010. Finally, Minister Kozhara announced Ukraine's President Viktor Yanukovych would visit in 2014.Yanukovych was overthrown as Ukraine's leader in 2014. Although Kazakhstani ally Russia vehemently opposed the post-revolutionary government in Kiev, Astana has maintained its own ties despite the change in power.

Mediterranean Dialogue

The Mediterranean Dialogue, first launched in 1994, is a forum of cooperation between NATO and seven countries of the Mediterranean. Its stated aim is "to create good relations and better mutual understanding and confidence throughout the region, promoting regional security and stability and explaining NATO's policies and goals."The Dialogue reflects NATO's view that security in Europe is tied to the security and stability in the Mediterranean. It also reinforces and complements the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership and the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe's Mediterranean Initiative.

Moldova–NATO relations

Official relations between Moldova and NATO began in 1992 when Moldova joined the North Atlantic Cooperation Council. However, as Moldova's neutrality is enshrined in its Constitution, there are no plans for Moldova to join the organization.

Partnership for Peace

The Partnership for Peace (PfP) is a North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) program aimed at creating trust between NATO and other states in Europe and the former Soviet Union; 21 states are members. It was first discussed by the Bulgarian Society Novae, after being proposed as an American initiative at the meeting of NATO defense ministers in Travemünde, Germany, on 20–21 October 1993, and formally launched on 10–11 January 1994 NATO summit in Brussels, Belgium. According to declassified U.S. State Department records, President Bill Clinton characterized the Partnership for Peace as a "track that will lead to NATO membership" and that "does not draw another line dividing Europe a few hundred miles to the east."

Selmo Cikotić

Selmo Cikotić (born January 25, 1964) is a politician of Bosnia and Herzegovina, member of the Party of Democratic Action, and former Army officer. He is the current Minister of Defence, a post he was appointed to in February 2007, but unable to take up officially until 22 April 2007, when a ban on former army officers performing defence-related civilian duties expired.In February 1993 he was made commander of operational group Zapad of the 3rd Corps of the Army of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina in Bugojno.

Cikotić served as the military attaché at the embassy of Bosnia and Herzegovina to the United States in Washington, D.C. from December 1994 to 1997. As Brigadier General he was enrolled at the U.S. Army's Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth in June 1997, before being expelled as a result of unconfirmed accusations made by Croatian officials that he commanded soldiers who tortured and killed people in and around Bugojno.From 2000 to 2004 he was the Commander of the 1st Corps of the Federation Army, and from 2004 to 2007 CEO of OKI in Sarajevo.

In June 2007 he jointly attended a Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council at the NATO headquarters in Brussels with the Serbian defence minister Dragan Šutanovac, together they expressed their governments' wish to join NATO as soon as possible.In March 2008 he led a five member delegation to Pakistan, to discuss "bilateral cooperation between the two Muslim countries".Cikotić has a master's degree from the University of Sarajevo in 2004 and is fluent in English.

Wolfgang Jilke

Major General Wolfgang Jilke (born in 1949 in Austria) served as Force Commander of the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF). He was appointed to this position by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in January 2007, succeeding Lieutenant General Bala Nanda Sharma of Nepal, who relinquished his post on 17 January 2007.

Prior to his appointment as Force Commander, Jilke served as a representative of Austria to the Military Committee of the European Union and in the Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council Military Committee of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). Before that, in 2002, he served as Chief of the Office of the Austrian Federal Minister of Defence.

In 1971, General Jilke was commissioned into the army in Austria, where he held a number of positions in various capacities. From 1983 to 1986, he became a teacher at the Austrian War College. He became a member of the Royal Defence Studies in London in 1997 and in the following two years, he served as Commander of the Austrian International Peace Support Command.

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