Eucamerotus

Eucamerotus (meaning "well-chambered" in reference to the hollows of the vertebrae) was a genus of sauropod dinosaur from the Barremian-age Lower Cretaceous Wessex Formation (Wealden) of the Isle of Wight, England.

Eucamerotus
Temporal range: Lower Cretaceous
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Clade: Dinosauria
Order: Saurischia
Suborder: Sauropodomorpha
Clade: Sauropoda
Clade: Titanosauriformes
Genus: Eucamerotus
Hulke, 1872
Species:
E. foxi
Binomial name
Eucamerotus foxi
Blows, 1995

History and taxonomy

John Hulke erected the genus in 1872 for NHMUK R.2522, a neural arch found by William D. Fox near Brighstone Bay, but provided no species name. He considered the Ornithopsis hulkei lectotype referable to the genus.[1][2] He later referred NMHUK R.2522 to Ornithopsis, synonymizing Eucamerotus with Seeley's name based on the discovery of additional vertebrae from the Isle of Wight.[3] Later authors treated Eucamerotus as a synonym of Pelorosaurus.[4][5][6]

William T. Blows resurrected the genus in 1995 as a valid brachiosaurid, added the specific name and added the species epithet foxi, designating the various vertebrae that Hulke (1879, 1880) had referred to Ornithopsis as paratypes, while referring additional vertebrae and partial skeleton MIWG-BP001 to it.[7] This last point has not been generally accepted;[2][8] unfortunately, this skeleton has never been officially described.

Naish and Martill (2001) suggested Eucamerotus was a dubious brachiosaurid, and did not find Blows' characters convincing.[2] Upchurch et al. (2004) considered it to be a dubious sauropod.[8] However, a more recent review of Wealden sauropods from England places Eucamerotus as a valid genus of Titanosauriformes incertae sedis.[9]

Paleobiology

The vertebrae are around twenty centimetres long. If a brachiosaurid, Eucamerotus may have been around 15 m (49.2 ft) long,[2] small for a sauropod. As any kind of sauropod, it would have been a quadrupedal herbivore.[8]

References

  1. ^ Hulke, J. W. (1872). "Appendix to a "Note on a new and undescribed Wealden Vertebra," read 9th February 1870, and published in the Quarterly Journal for August in the same year". Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society. 28 (1–2): 36–38. doi:10.1144/GSL.JGS.1872.028.01-02.15.
  2. ^ a b c d Naish, D., and Martill, D.M. (2001). Saurischian dinosaurs 1: Sauropods. In: Martill, D.M., and Naish, D. (eds.). Dinosaurs of the Isle of Wight. The Palaeontological Association:London 185-241. ISBN 0-901702-72-2
  3. ^ Hulke, J. W. (1879). "Note (3rd) on (Eucamerotus, Hulke) Ornithopsis, H. G. Seeley, = Bothriospondylus magnus, Owen, = Chondrosteosaurus magnus, Owen". Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society. 35 (1–4): 752–762. doi:10.1144/GSL.JGS.1879.035.01-04.55.
  4. ^ von Huene, F. (1909). Skizze zu einer Systematik und Stammesgeschichte der Dinosaurier. Centralblatt für Mineralogie, Geologie und Paläontologie 1909:12-22. [German]
  5. ^ Romer, A.S. (1956). Osteology of the Reptiles. University of Chicago Press:Chicago 1-772. ISBN 0-89464-985-X
  6. ^ Steel, R. (1970). Part 14. Saurischia. Handbuch der Paläoherpetologie/Encyclopedia of Paleoherpetology. Part 14. Gustav Fischer Verlag:Stuttgart p. 1-87.
  7. ^ Blows, W.T. (1995). "The Early Cretaceous brachiosaurid dinosaurs Ornithopsis and Eucamerotus from the Isle of Wight, England" (PDF). Palaeontology. 38 (1): 187–197.
  8. ^ a b c Upchurch, P.M., Barrett, P.M., and Dodson, P. (2004). Sauropoda. In: Weishampel, D.B., Dodson, P., and Osmólska, H. (eds.). The Dinosauria (2nd edition). University of California Press:Berkeley 259-322. ISBN 0-520-24209-2
  9. ^ Upchurch, P., Mannion, P. D. & Barrett, P. M. 2011. Sauropod dinosaurs. In Batten, D. J. (ed.) English Wealden Fossils. The Palaeontological Association (London), pp. 476-525.

External links

Apatosaurinae

Apatosaurinae is the name of a subfamily of diplodocid sauropods that existed between 157 and 150 million years ago in North America. The group includes two genera for certain, Apatosaurus and Brontosaurus, with at least five species. Atlantosaurus and Amphicoelias might also belong to this group.Below is a cladogram of apatosaurinae interrelationships based on Tschopp et al., 2015.

Argyrosauridae

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Astrophocaudia

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Brasilotitan

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Cedarosaurus

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Cetiosauridae

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Daxiatitan

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Diplodocinae

Diplodocinae is an extinct subfamily of diplodocid sauropods that existed from the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous of North America, Europe and South America, about 161.2 to 136.4 million years ago. Genera within the subfamily include Tornieria, Supersaurus, Leinkupal, Galeamopus, Diplodocus, Kaatedocus and Barosaurus.Cladogram of the Diplodocidae after Tschopp, Mateus, and Benson (2015).

Eomamenchisaurus

Eomamenchisaurus (meaning "dawn Mamenchisaurus") is a genus of mamenchisaurid sauropod dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of Yuanmou, Yunnan, China. The type species is E. yuanmouensis, described by Lü Junchang et al. in 2008.

Ferganasaurus

Ferganasaurus was a genus of dinosaur first formally described in 2003 by Alifanov and Averianov. The type species is Ferganasaurus verzilini. It was a sauropod similar to Rhoetosaurus. The fossils were discovered in 1966 in Kyrgyzstan from the Balabansai Formation and date to the Callovian stage of the Middle Jurassic.

Flagellicaudata

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Huangshanlong

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Kaijutitan

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Ornithopsis

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Tambatitanis

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Tastavinsaurus

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Tengrisaurus

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William Fox (palaeontologist)

William D. Fox (9 August 1813 – 1881) was an English clergyman and palaeontologist who worked on the Isle of Wight and made some significant discoveries of dinosaur fossils.

The Reverend William D. Fox was born in Cumberland. He moved to the Isle of Wight in 1862 to take up the post of curate at the Parish church of St Mary the Virgin in Brixton (now known as Brighstone). He resigned his post in 1867 but continued to live in the area to carry on his collecting. In 1875, he became curate of nearby Kingston, near Shorwell.Although lacking formal scientific training Fox was remarkably astute and discussed his findings with eminent palaeontologists of the day including John Hulke (1830-1895) and Sir Richard Owen. Fox had easy access to Brighstone Bay from his home, Myrtle Cottage in Brighstone, and so spent many an hour collecting fossils, much to the detriment of his pastoral work; in fact, it was said of him at the time, by the wife of the vicar, that it was "always bones first and the parish next". He is also quoted as having written in a letter to Owen "I cannot leave this place while I have any money left to live on, I take such deep [sic] in hunting for old dragons".In 1882 Fox's collection of more than 500 specimens was acquired by the Natural History Museum after his death.Fox is credited with the finding of several species, most described by his friend Owen, and named by him after their finder. These include Polacanthus foxii, Hypsilophodon foxii, Eucamerotus foxi, Iguanodon foxii, Calamosaurus foxii (formerly Calamospondylus) and Aristosuchus.

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