Eternity Comics

Eternity Comics was a California-based comic book publisher active from 1986 to 1994, first as an independent publisher, then as an imprint of Malibu Comics. Eternity published creator-owned comics of an offbeat, independent flavor, as well as some licensed properties. Eternity was also notable for reprinting foreign titles, and introducing Cat Claw, The Jackaroo, and the Southern Squadron to the U.S. market.

Such well-known creators as Brian Pulido, Evan Dorkin, Dale Berry, Ben Dunn, Dean Haspiel, and Ron Lim got their starts with Eternity.

Eternity Comics
IndustryComics
Founded1985
Defunct1994
HeadquartersNewbury Park, California
Key people
Scott Mitchell Rosenberg
OwnerMarvel Comics
ParentMalibu Comics

History

Origins

Eternity began publishing in 1986, debuting with such titles as Earthlore, Gonad the Barbarian, The Mighty Mites, Ninja, and Reign of the Dragonlord (with only Ninja lasting more than a couple of issues).

Scott Mitchell Rosenberg

In April 1987, The Comics Journal revealed that Eternity had been financed, along with Amazing Comics, Wonder Color Comics, and Imperial Comics, by Scott Mitchell Rosenberg.[1] After this was made public, Rosenberg discontinued most of these publishers, but retained the Eternity label as an imprint of Malibu Comics, also eventually bringing in Canadian publisher Aircel Comics under the Eternity/Malibu umbrella.[2]

Robotech

One of Eternity's most successful titles was its 1988–1994 licensing of the Robotech franchise. The creators, the Waltrip brothers started with direct adaptations of the Robotech II: The Sentinels scripts and novels into comic format. Then they began writing additional stories that expanded the canon beyond the initial 85 animated Robotech episodes and The Sentinels. As the series progressed the Waltrips began deviating from the Sentinels novels, adding new story elements and new characters.

Legal battles

During its existence, Eternity was no stranger to legal squabbles. The popular title Ex-Mutants was first published by Eternity from 1987–1988, and was then moved to Amazing Comics (with contractual problems resulting in yet another move to Pied Piper Comics). A legal dispute followed, and after running out of money for the struggle, creators David Lawrence and Ron Lim surrendered: the title returned to Eternity and was later published in a revamped version by Malibu.

Eternity's 1989 publication of The Uncensored Mouse, which reprinted Mickey Mouse comics from the 1930s — without Disney's permission — led to a run-in with Walt Disney Productions. Eternity printed The Uncensored Mouse with totally black covers, bagged (to prevent casual buyers from flipping through the comic), and the inside of the comic had a printed notice: "Mickey Mouse is a registered trademark of Walt Disney Productions" so as not to confuse the market that it was an authorized Disney production. Eternity believed it had not violated any copyrights because strips had fallen into public domain. Regardless, Disney brought a lawsuit against the company and the series was cancelled after just two issues (six issues were solicited).[3]

Similarly, Eternity's 1989-1992 adaptation of the popular Japanese manga Captain Harlock was discontinued after it was discovered that Eternity/Malibu did not have the Captain Harlock rights. The alleged representative for the rights to Harlock with whom Malibu exchanged money turned out to be fraudulent and was in no way connected to the actual rights holders.

Decline and acquisition by Marvel

Malibu stopped using the Eternity imprint before Marvel acquired Malibu,[4] when Eternity's last two franchises moved to other publishers in the middle of 1994: Ninja High School returning to Antarctic Press and Robotech moving to Academy Comics.

Titles (selected)

Notes

  1. ^ "Distributor Finances Five Publishers," The Comics Journal #115 (Apr. 1987), pp. 12-13: About Rosenberg and Eternity, Imperial Comics, Amazing, Malibu, and Wonder Color Comics.
  2. ^ "Eternity Merges with Aircel," The Comics Journal #125 (October 1988), p. 19.
  3. ^ Korkis, Jim. "The Uncensored Mouse," Jim Hill Media (September 9, 2003).
  4. ^ Reynolds, Eric. "The Rumors are True: Marvel Buys Malibu," The Comics Journal #173 (December 1994), pp. 29-33.
  5. ^ "Plan 9 From Outer Space: Thirty Years Later". Atomic Avenue. Retrieved 2007-05-13.

References

External links

Aircel Comics

Aircel Comics (Aircel Publishing) was a Canadian comic book publisher founded by Barry Blair, based in Ottawa and active from 1985 until 1994. In 1988, it merged with American publisher Eternity Comics, itself an imprint of Malibu Comics, and in the late 1980s was taken over by Malibu before ceasing publication.

During Aircel's inception, it focused primary upon storytelling techniques, blending historical, and futuristic fantasy from different cultures as the underlying theme for each comic series. The Aircel comic book "style" featured high-quality colour covers with black-and white interiors. Canadian artists such as Dave Cooper, Denis Beauvais, and Dale Keown got their start at Aircel. Charles de Lint also scripted several comic books for Aircel in the mid-1980s.

In the late 1980s, Aircel terminated its previous comic book series and pursued sex-themed comics in a partnership with Malibu Comics. After 1990, Aircel achieved some commercial success with the Men in Black comic.

Bruce Timm

Bruce Walter Timm (born February 5, 1961) is an American artist, character designer, animator, writer, producer, and actor. He is best known for his contributions building the modern DC Comics animated franchise, the DC animated universe.

Dale Berry

Dale W. Berry (born April 20, 1960) is a commercial artist and designer in San Francisco, California, who is best known for his work on the graphic novel series Tales of the Moonlight Cutter, which is published by his company, Myriad Publications.

Berry also created Ninja Funnies for Eternity Comics, and the character Dragonhead with co-creator Eric Dinehart.In addition to his work in commercial art and graphic novels, Berry is a professional fencing instructor and hosted a weekly radio program on KRZR.

David de Vries

David (Dave) de Vries (born 1961) is an Australian film writer, director and producer and a comic book artist and writer.

David de Vries was born in Wellington, New Zealand, in 1961, growing up in the inner suburb of Ngaio, before emigrating to Melbourne at an early age with his parents, where he lived until he was eighteen. After studying painting at RMIT he started his comic book career in the early 1980s with work for OzComics, Phantastique, MAD Magazine and Penthouse. Together with Gary Chaloner, Glenn Lumsden and Tad Pietrzykowski he established Cyclone Comics in 1985, to ensure that their characters could be published while remaining under their control.de Vries and Lumsden entered the American market through First Comics, Nicotat and Malibu Graphics with The Southern Squadron, a superhero team that had taken over the Cyclone title. Together they have drawn a new look version of The Phantom for Marvel Comics, have worked on Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight Star Trek comics for DC Comics, The Eternal Warrior Yearbook for Valiant Comics, The Puppet Master for Eternity Comics and Planet of the Apes and Flesh Gordon for Malibu Comics. de Vries also worked on a number of projects as a writer, including The Thing From Another World for First Comics, Black Lightning and a Green Lantern annual for DC, as well as recreating the origin of Captain Boomerang with John Ostrander in an episode of the Suicide Squad.

de Vries currently lives in South Australia where he founded the Barossa Studios with Lumsden, David Heinrich, Rod Tokely and David G. Williams, doing artwork for magazines like Picture, People, Ralph, The Australian Financial Review and The Bulletin.In 2009 de Vries wrote and directed a feature film, Carmilla Hyde, which won 'Best Feature' at the South Australian Screen Awards in March 2010 after winning 'Best Guerilla Feature' and 'Best Supporting Actress' at the Melbourne Underground Film Festival. Carmilla Hyde has won nine awards, which also include 'Best International Feature' Swansea Bay Film Festival, 'Best International Feature' International Film Festival South Africa, 'Best Australian Feature' Sexy International Film Festival and 'Best Foreign Film' Minneapolis Underground Film Festival.

de Vries has written a number of live action and animation scripts for such film and TV. He is course coordinator of the Advance Production Projects for the Third Year Film & Television students at UniSA, and the Festival Director for the Barossa Film Festival.

Dinosaurs for Hire

Dinosaurs for Hire is an American comic book series created by Tom Mason in 1988. It was first published by Eternity Comics and ran nine issues until 1990 when it was cancelled. The title returned to publication in 1993 by Malibu Comics, which had purchased Eternity as an imprint.

Dinosaurs For Hire, along with Ex-Mutants, was merged with the Protectors universe during Malibu's Genesis crossover before being cancelled a second time. When Malibu was purchased by Marvel Comics in 1993, the rights to Dinosaurs for Hire were included in the sale.

Dollman (film)

Dollman is a 1991 science fiction action film directed by Albert Pyun and starring Tim Thomerson as the space cop Brick Bardo, also known as "Dollman"; he is only 13 inches tall. Bardo is equipped with his "Kruger Blaster", which is the most powerful handgun in the universe. The film also stars Jackie Earle Haley as Bardo's human enemy, Braxton Red. "Brick Bardo" is a character name used by Albert Pyun in films dating back to his second film, Vicious Lips.

The film was produced by Full Moon Features, who also worked with Thomerson on the Trancers series. It was followed by a crossover sequel in 1993 called Dollman vs. Demonic Toys, which is also a sequel to Demonic Toys (1992) and Bad Channels (1992).

Dollman also had its own comic series published by Eternity Comics, who also made comics for other Full Moon films.

Eternity (comics)

Eternity is a fictional cosmic entity appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. He is the de facto leader of the abstract entities collectively known as the Cosmic Powers of the Marvel Universe.

Created by scripter-editor Stan Lee and artist-plotter Steve Ditko, the character is first mentioned in Strange Tales #134 (July 1965) and first appears in Strange Tales #138 (Nov. 1965).

Debuting in the Silver Age of Comic Books, the character has appeared in five decades of Marvel continuity and appeared in associated Marvel merchandise including animated television series, trading cards, and video games.

Ex-Mutants

Ex-Mutants was a comic book series created by writer David Lawrence and artist Ron Lim along with editor David Campiti in 1986. It was first published by Eternity Comics and then Amazing Comics. Contractual problems resulted in a move to Pied Piper Comics. A legal dispute followed, and after running out of money for the struggle, the creators surrendered. The title returned to Eternity Comics and was later published in a revamped version by Malibu Comics, which Eternity had become an imprint of. A videogame for the Sega Genesis based on the Malibu version was released.

Gary Dumm

Gary G. Dumm (b. c. 1947) is an Ohio-based comic book artist known particularly for his work illustrating the comics of Harvey Pekar.

From 1976 until Pekar's 2010 death, he worked on Pekar's autobiographical comic series, American Splendor, much of the time as an inker, embellishing the pencils of Greg Budgett and Joe Zabel, although he also illustrated some stories on his own. (Dumm has also inked Zabel in other venues, including Caliber's Dancing With Your Eyes Closed, Fantagraphics' Real Stuff, and Zabel's own title The Trespassers.)

Dumm was one of Pekar's most frequent and longest-running collaborators on American Splendor; his no-frills style fit the tone of Pekar's tales of quotidian life. Although Dumm's work was characterized by one reviewer as "ham-fisted," whose characters all look "45" years old, Pekar "had great appreciation for Gary as an artist and as a person. . . . He's also good to work with — he's always on time, and can meet practically any kind of deadline. He's especially good at working large blocks of text into his work without making it seem text-heavy."Dumm also collaborated with Pekar as the primary artist on two full-length books, Ego & Hubris: The Michael Malice Story, and Students for a Democratic Society: A Graphic History.

During the 1980s, Budgett and Dumm worked on stories in Dr. Wirtham's Comix & Stories, an underground/alternative comics series published by Clifford Neal, as well as a number of other alternative and independent comic book series. In the early 1990s, Budgett and Dumm co-wrote and drew stories for Eternity Comics' Plan 9 From Outer Space: Thirty Years Later and their own erotic series Shooty Beagle and Woofers & Hooters (both with Eros Comix).

Dumm has also worked on such projects as Dennis McGee and The Miracle Squad. He contributes a regular strip (illustrated bios of blues people) to the newsletter Music Makers Rag. His editorial cartoons have been published in Cleveland Scene, Cleveland Free Times, and The Plain Dealer. A retrospective of his work was shown at the Artists Archives of the Western Reserve in Cleveland.Dumm says he feels "itchy" when he’s not drawing.

Glenn Lumsden

Glenn Lumsden is an Australian comic book artist and writer.

Born in Sydney in 1964, he began self publishing in 1985 with David de Vries, Gary Chaloner and Tad Pietrzykowski under the Cyclone Comics imprint, working on The Southern Squadron and Dark Nebula.Lumsden and de Vries entered the American market through First Comics, Nicotat and Malibu Graphics with The Southern Squadron. Together they have drawn a new look version of The Phantom for Marvel Comics, have worked on Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight and Star Trek comics for DC Comics The Puppet Master for Eternity Comics and Planet of the Apes and Flesh Gordon for Malibu Comics.Lumsden moved to South Australia where he founded the Barossa Studios with David Heinrich, Rod Tokely and David G. Williams, doing artwork for magazines like Picture, People, Ralph, The Australian Financial Review and The Bulletin.

Greg Budgett

Greg Budgett (b. c. 1952) is a Cleveland, Ohio-based comic book artist known particularly for his work illustrating the comics of Harvey Pekar. Most of Budgett's work on Pekar's American Splendor and other comics has been in partnership with Gary Dumm, who has inked most of Budgett's stories.

Budgett attended Ohio State University, graduating with a Bachelor of Fine Arts. Pekar and Budgett began working together in 1974; before American Splendor, Budgett illustrated a couple of short Pekar stories (one of them in partnership with Dumm) in the underground comix anthologies Bizarre Sex and Flaming Baloney X.

From 1976 until 1988, Budgett illustrated stories in Pekar's autobiographical comics series, American Splendor. Budgett was one of Pekar's most frequent early collaborators; most of his stories were inked by Dumm. Budgett drew a number of American Splendor covers as well, including issues #2, 3, 7, 8, 11, and 13.

During the 1980s, Budgett and Dumm worked on stories in Dr. Wirtham's Comix & Stories, an underground/alternative comics series published by Clifford Neal, as well as a number of other alternative and independent comic book series. In the early 1990s, Budgett and Dumm co-wrote and drew stories for Eternity Comics' Plan 9 from Outer Space: Thirty Years Later and their own erotic series Shooty Beagle and Woofers & Hooters (both with Eros Comix).

By the early 1990s, Budgett had "de-emphasized cartooning" and didn't work in the industry again until 2004, when (at the urging of Gary Dumm) he illustrated another Pekar story in the 2004 collection American Splendor: Our Movie Year. He was a regular contributor to Vertigo's two American Splendor limited series in 2006–2008.

List of objects in the DC Universe

Thia is a list of fictional objects and materials existing in the DC Universe.

Malibu Comics

Malibu Comics Entertainment, Inc. (also known as Malibu Graphics) was an American comic book publisher active in the late 1980s and early 1990s, best known for its Ultraverse line of superhero titles. Notable titles under the Malibu label included The Men in Black, Ultraforce, The Night Man and Exiles.

The company's headquarters was in Calabasas, California. Malibu was initially publisher of record for Image Comics from 1992 to 1993. The company's other imprints included Aircel Comics and Eternity Comics. Malibu also owned a small software development company that designed video games in the early to mid-1990s called Malibu Interactive.

Puppet Master (Eternity Comics)

Puppet Master is a limited comic book series based on the horror film franchise of the same name and published by Eternity Comics And Full Moon Entertainment.

Puppet Master (comics)

In comics, Puppet Master may refer to:

Puppet Master (Marvel Comics), a Marvel Comics supervillain

Puppeteer (comics), a DC Comics supervillain formerly called Puppet Master

Puppet Master (Eternity Comics), a comic book series based on the horror film franchise Puppet Master

Puppet Master (Action Lab Comics)

The Trouble with Girls (comics)

The Trouble with Girls is an American comic book published serially from 1987–1993 by Malibu Comics/Eternity Comics, Comico, and Epic Comics. It was written by Will Jacobs and Gerard Jones, and drawn by Tim Hamilton and others.The Trouble with Girls is a satirical action series starring Lester Girls, who wants to be simply an "average guy" with a dead-end job, a plain wife, and no adventures more exciting than a good night's sleep. But Lester can't go for a drive without terrorists launching missiles at him, or walk into one of his many mansions without a beautiful, talented, curvaceous woman reposing half-dressed on his bed. Wealth, adventure, sexual magnetism, dashing good looks, and the savoir faire of a Hollywood action hero are what he calls "the curse of Girls."Hamilton's clean, linear art evokes classic superhero comics. In one four-page set piece, Apache Dick, a Girls analogue who loves the high life, launches an escape that starts with pole-vaulting the Great Wall of China and ends with him crawling from the smoking wreckage of a kamikaze plane muttering only, "the bungalow."

The Uncensored Mouse

The Uncensored Mouse was a comic book series published by Eternity Comics in 1989. The title derives from the fact that the strips were unedited.

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