Estonian euro coins

Estonian euro coins feature a single design for all eight coins. This is a design by Lembit Lõhmus and features a silhouette map of Estonia together with the word Eesti (Estonia) and twelve stars, symbolic of the European Union, surrounding the map. This was the winning design in a public vote of ten announced in December 2004.

Estonian euro coins entered circulation on 1 January 2011. Estonia is the fifth of ten states that joined the EU in 2004, and the first ex-Soviet republic to join the eurozone.[1]

Euro coins starter kit (Estonia)1
An Estonian euro starter kit

History

Of the ten new EU member states, Estonia was the first to unveil its design. The country originally planned to adopt the euro on 1 January 2007; however, it did not formally apply when Slovenia did, and officially changed its target date to 1 January 2008, and later, to 1 January 2011.[1]

On 12 May 2010, the European Commission announced that Estonia had met all criteria to join the eurozone.[2] On 8 June 2010, the EU finance ministers agreed that Estonia would be able to join the euro on 1 January 2011.[3] On 13 July 2010, Estonia received the final approval from the ECOFIN to adopt the euro as from 1 January 2011. On the same date of 13 July 2010, the exchange rate at which the kroon would be exchanged for the euro (€1 = 15.6466 krooni) was also announced. On 20 July 2010, mass production of Estonian euro coins began in the Mint of Finland. 2012 coins were produced by the Royal Dutch Mint, having won the production bid.

Estonian euro design

For images of the common side and a detailed description of the coins, see euro coins. A design competition was first held in 2004 for the design of the Estonian euro coins. 134 designs were submitted to the competition, and the 10 best designs were selected, which were then voted on by telephone by the Estonian people.[4]

Depiction of Estonian euro coinage | Obverse side
€ 0.01 € 0.02 € 0.05
Silhouette of Estonia
€ 0.10 € 0.20 € 0.50
Silhouette of Estonia
€ 1.00 € 2.00 € 2 Coin Edge
Estonian 2 euro coin edge (condensed) "O" and "E E S T I" repeated alternately upright and inverted
Relief silhouette of Estonia

Circulating mintage quantities

Face value[5] €0.01 €0.02 €0.05 €0.10 €0.20 €0.50 €1.00 €2.00 €2.00 CC Total
2011 32,000,000 30,000,000 30,000,000 30,000,000 25,000,000 20,000,000 16,000,000 11,000,000 * 194,000,000[6]
2012 25,000,000 25,000,000 * * * * * * 2,000,000 52,000,000[7]
2015 14,000,000 17,000,000 * * * * * * 350,000 31,350,000[8]
2016 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 * 520,000[9] 660,000[10]
2017 29,000,000 9,000,000 4,550,000 * 3,250,000 * * * 1,500,000[11] 47,300,000[12]
2018 500,000 8,500,000 4,500,000 500,000 4,000,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 1,817,800 21,317,800

* No coins were minted that year for that denomination

Mints

2011: Finland
2012: Netherlands
2015: Lithuania
2016: Finland

Design controversy

Ethnic Setos have protested the design of the coin, claiming that the outline of the map of Estonia does not include the former south eastern region of Estonia that constituted a part of the Seto homeland annexed by Stalin during the occupation of the Baltic states.[13] On the other hand, a Russian lawyer Sergei Seredenko claimed that the outline included Russian-controlled areas.[14] The Russian embassy was prompted to issue a statement that the euro coins do indeed depict the current borders of the country's territory.[15]

References

  1. ^ a b "Alcohol and tobacco tax to rise in Estonia next year". Helsingin Sanomat. 25 May 2007. Retrieved 1 January 2009.
  2. ^ "Estonia ready for euro". European Commission. 12 May 2010. Retrieved 12 May 2010.
  3. ^ Estonia to Join Euro 1 January 2011 Archived 11 June 2010 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ "The Estonian euro coin". Tere Euro. Bank of Estonia. 2011-07-11. Retrieved 2019-02-09.
  5. ^ "Production of the Estonian euro coins". Bank of Estonia. Retrieved 2011-11-09.
  6. ^ "Eesti euromünte vermitakse Soomes 194 miljonit tükki". EPL. Retrieved 2010-12-30.
  7. ^ "Eesti Pank laseb käibele 2012. aasta 1- ja 2-sendised mündid". BoE. Retrieved 2012-05-02.
  8. ^ "Mintage quantities of the euro coins and official euro collector folders". BoE. Retrieved 2014-07-06.
  9. ^ "New national side of euro coins intended for circulation". Official Journal of the European Union. 18 December 2015. Retrieved 25 August 2018.
  10. ^ "Euro coins". Bank of Estonia. Retrieved 2018-04-09.
  11. ^ "New national side of euro coins intended for circulation". Official Journal of the European Union. 30 June 2017. Retrieved 25 August 2018.
  12. ^ "Euro coins". Bank of Estonia. Retrieved 2018-04-09.
  13. ^ "Setos Protest Truncated Map of Estonia". Estonian Public Broadcasting News. 1 January 2011. Retrieved 8 January 2011.
  14. ^ Richard Giedroyc (14 February 2011). "Coin Reflects Estonia Border Dispute". World Coin News.
  15. ^ "Another Side to the Euro Coin Map Dispute". Estonian Public Broadcasting News. 7 January 2011. Retrieved 8 January 2011.

External links

100 krooni

The 100 krooni banknote (100 EEK) is a denomination of the Estonian kroon, the former currency of Estonia. Lydia Koidula (1843–1886), who was an Estonian poet and playwright, is featured on the front side of the banknote, which is why the 100 krooni banknote is often called a "Koidula".

A view of the north Estonian limestone shore is featured on the reverse side of the banknote. Before the replacement of the kroon by the euro, the 100 krooni banknote was the main everyday currency used by Estonians and was commonly dispensed by ATMs in Estonia as well as used for withdrawals or cashing checks. It can be exchanged indefinitely at the currency museum of Eesti Pank for €6.39.

10 euro cent coin

The 10 euro cent coin (€0.10) has a value of one tenth of a euro and is composed of an alloy called Nordic gold. All coins have a common reverse side and country-specific national sides. The coin has been used since 2002, with the present common side design dating from 2007.

10 krooni

The 10 krooni banknote (10 EEK) is a denomination of the Estonian kroon, the former currency of Estonia. Jakob Hurt (1839–1907), who was an Estonian folklorist, theologian, linguist and prominent social figure during the Estonian national awakening in the 19th–20th century, is featured with an engraved portrait on the obverse side of the banknote. The 10 krooni bill is sometimes called a "Hurt".

A view of the Tamme-Lauri oak tree at Urvaste is featured on the reverse.

The EEK has been withdrawn and replaced by the euro, but the 10 krooni can be exchanged indefinitely at the currency museum of Eesti Pank for €0.64.

1 euro cent coin

The 1 euro cent coin (€0.01) has a value of one hundredth of a euro and is composed of copper-covered steel. The coins of every Euro country have a common reverse and each has a country-specific (national) obverse. The coin has been used since 2002 and was not redesigned in 2007 as was the case with the higher-value coins.

1 kroon

The 1 kroon (1 EEK) is the smallest valued banknote of the Estonian kroon, the former currency of Estonia. Kristjan Raud (1865–1943), an Estonian painter, teacher, and cultural historian, is featured with a portrait on the obverse. A view of Toompea Castle in Tallinn appears on the reverse.The 1 kroon was only issued once and had been steadily going out of circulation since a coin of the same value was also issued. At the time of replacement by the euro, it was very rarely found in use on an everyday basis. It can be exchanged indefinitely at the currency museum of Eesti Pank for €0.06.

1 kroon coin (1934)

The 1 kroon coin was put in circulation from 1 August 1934 to 25 March 1941, during the first independence period of Estonia. The exact number of coins minted is not known, as part of the archives was destroyed in the war, but some data indicate that about 3,406,066 pieces were struck. Between 1935 and 1936, 1,586,000 1 kroon coins were minted. Designed by graphic artist Günther Reindorff, it depicts the image of a 13th-century Viking cargo ship.

20 euro cent coin

The 20 euro cent coin (€0.20) has a value of one fifth of a euro and is composed of an alloy called nordic gold in the Spanish flower shape. All coins have a common reverse side and country-specific national sides. The coin has been used since 2002, with the present common side design dating from 2007.

25 krooni

The 25 krooni banknote (25 EEK) is a denomination of the Estonian kroon, the former currency of Estonia. Anton Hansen Tammsaare (1870–1940), who was a famous Estonian writer of classical literature, is featured on the front side of the bill, which is why the 25 krooni banknote is often called a "Tammekas or Tammsaare".

A view of Vargamäe is featured on the reverse side of the banknote. Before the replacement of the EEK by the euro, the 25 krooni was frequently used in everyday transactions. It can be exchanged indefinitely at the currency museum of Eesti Pank for €1.60.

2 euro cent coin

The 2 euro cent coin (€0.02) has a value of one-fiftieth of a euro and is composed of copper-plated steel. All coins have a common reverse and country-specific (national) obverse. The coin has been used since 2002 and was not redesigned in 2007 as were the higher-value coins.

2 krooni

The 2 krooni banknote (2 EEK) is a denomination of the Estonian kroon, the former currency of Estonia. Karl Ernst von Baer, who was an Estonian Baltic German anthropologist, naturalist and geographer (1792–1876), is featured with a portrait on the obverse. The 2 krooni bill is called sometimes a "kahene" meaning "a two".

A view of Tartu University which was founded in 1632 is featured on the reverse. Before the replacement of the EEK by the euro, the 2 krooni banknote was the smallest denomination most commonly used by Estonian residents on an everyday basis. It can be exchanged indefinitely at the currency museum of Eesti Pank for €0.13.

500 krooni

The 500 krooni banknote (500 EEK) is a denomination of the Estonian kroon, the former currency of Estonia. Carl Robert Jakobson (1841–1882), who was an Estonian politician, publisher, writer and promoter of agriculture, is featured on the front side of the bill, which is why the 500 krooni bill is often called a "Jakobson".

A barn swallow in flight on a landscape background is featured on the reverse side of the banknote. Before the replacement of the EEK by the euro, the 500 krooni banknote was commonly dispensed by ATMs in Estonia as well as the primary banknote used for withdrawals or cashing checks. It can be exchanged indefinitely at the currency museum of Eesti Pank for €31.96.

50 euro cent coin

The 50 euro cent coin (€0.50) has a value of half a euro and are composed of an alloy called nordic gold. All coins have a common reverse side and country-specific national sides. The coin has been used since 2002, with the present common side design dating from 2007.

50 krooni

The 50 krooni banknote (50 EEK) is a denomination of the Estonian kroon, the former currency of Estonia. A portrait of Rudolf Tobias (1873–1918), a famous Estonian composer, is engraved on the front side of the bill along with the pipe organ of the Käina church (which features the Eye of Providence).

The vignette on the back features the Estonia Theatre in Tallinn. The only printing of the 50 krooni banknote took place in 1994. Fewer 50 krooni notes were ordered by the Bank of Estonia than any other denominations. A medium size banknote, it was one of the most rarely used denominations. It can be exchanged indefinitely at the currency museum of Eesti Pank for €3.20.

5 euro cent coin

The 5 euro cent coin (€0.05) has a value of one twentieth of a euro and is composed of copper-covered steel. All coins have a common reverse and country-specific (national) obverse. The coin has been used since 2002 and was not re-designed in 2007 as was the case with the higher-value coins.

5 krooni

The 5 krooni banknote (5 EEK) is a denomination of the Estonian kroon, the former currency of Estonia. Paul Keres (1916–1975), who was a world-famous Estonian chess player, international Grandmaster and prominent chess theorist, is featured with an engraved portrait on the obverse.

The reverse features Hermann Castle founded in 1256 by the Danes and Ivangorod Fortress established by Ivan III in 1492. The 5 krooni banknote was only issued shortly after the reestablishment of the Estonian state in 1991, but remained in common use until the EEK was replaced by the euro. A 5 krooni coin was also minted but the banknote was more commonly found in circulation. The note can be exchanged indefinitely at the currency museum of Eesti Pank for €0.32.

Bank of Estonia

The Bank of Estonia (Estonian: Eesti Pank) is the central bank of Estonia as well as a member of the Eurosystem organisation of euro area central banks.

The Bank of Estonia also belongs to the European System of Central Banks. Until 2010, the bank issued the former Estonian currency, the kroon.

The Governor of the Bank of Estonia, currently Ardo Hansson, is a member of the Governing Council of the European Central Bank.

Estonian kroon

The kroon (sign: kr; code: EEK) was the official currency of Estonia for two periods in history: 1928–1940 and 1992–2011. Between 1 January and 14 January 2011, the kroon circulated together with the euro, after which the euro became the sole legal tender in Estonia. The kroon was subdivided into 100 cents (senti; singular sent). The word kroon (Estonian pronunciation: [ˈkroːn], “crown”) is related to that of the Nordic currencies (such as the Swedish krona and the Danish and Norwegian krone) and derived from the Latin word corona ("crown"). The kroon succeeded the mark in 1928 and was in use until the Soviet invasion in 1940 and Estonia's subsequent incorporation into the Soviet Union when it was replaced by the Soviet ruble. After Estonia regained its independence, the kroon was reintroduced in 1992.

Euro gold and silver commemorative coins (Estonia)

Euro gold and silver commemorative coins are special euro coins minted and issued by member states of the Eurozone, mainly in gold and silver, although other precious metals are also used in rare occasions. Estonia joined the Eurozone on 1. January 2011. Since then Bank of Estonia has been issuing both normal issues of Estonian euro coins, which are intended for circulation, and commemorative euro coins in gold and silver.

List of euro mints

Several euro mints exist in the eurozone. Not every eurozone member state has its own mint to produce euro coins.

Mincovňa Kremnica, Slovakia

Slovak euro coins

Staatliche Münzen Baden-Württemberg

German euro coins

Latvian euro coins

Suomen Rahapaja (Mint of Finland)

Estonian euro coins

Greek euro coins

Luxembourgish euro coins

Slovenian euro coins

Cypriot euro coins

Irish euro coins

Istituto Poligrafico e Zecca dello Stato

Vatican euro coins

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