Equipe Ligier

Equipe Ligier is a motorsport team, best known for its Formula One team that operated from 1976 to 1996. The team was founded in 1968 by former French rugby union player Guy Ligier as a sports car manufacturer.[2][3]

Ligier
Logo Ligier
Full nameEquipe Ligier
BaseVichy (1976–1988) and Magny-Cours (1989–1996), France[1]
Founder(s)Guy Ligier
Noted staffKen Anderson
Loïc Bigois
Flavio Briatore
Cyril de Rouvre
Frank Dernie
Richard Divila
Gérard Ducarouge
Claude Galopin
Tom Walkinshaw
Noted driversFrance Jacques Laffite
France Patrick Depailler
Belgium Jacky Ickx
France Didier Pironi
United States Eddie Cheever
Italy Andrea de Cesaris
France René Arnoux
Sweden Stefan Johansson
Belgium Thierry Boutsen
United Kingdom Martin Brundle
United Kingdom Mark Blundell
Japan Aguri Suzuki
France Olivier Panis
Next nameProst Grand Prix
Formula One World Championship career
First entry1976 Brazilian Grand Prix
Races entered332 entries (326 starts)
EnginesMatra, Ford-Cosworth, Renault, Megatron, Lamborghini, Mugen-Honda
Constructors'
Championships
0 (best finish: 2nd, 1980)
Drivers'
Championships
0
Race victories9
Podiums50
Points388
Pole positions9
Fastest laps10
Final entry1996 Japanese Grand Prix

Sports car origins

After retiring from racing following the death of his friend Jo Schlesser, Guy Ligier decided to found his own team and had engineer Michel Tétu develop a sports car named JS1 (Schlesser's initials). The Cosworth-powered JS1 took wins at Albi and Monthlery in 1970, but retired at Le Mans and from the Tour Automobile de France.[4]

For 1971, Ligier had the JS1 developed into the JS2 and JS3. The JS2 was homologated for road use and used a Maserati V6 engine, while the JS3 was an open-top sports-prototype powered by a Cosworth DFV V8 engine. The JS3 won at Monthlery in 1971 but failed to finish the minimum distance in Le Mans. Therefore, it was retired,[5] and Ligier installed the Cosworth DFV in the JS2 road car, finishing second overall at Le Mans in 1975.[6] Guy Ligier then switched his efforts into Formula One.

Formula One

Following the acquisition of the Matra F1 team's assets, Ligier entered Formula One in 1976 with a Matra V12-powered car, and won the 1977 Swedish Grand Prix with Jacques Laffite. This is generally considered to have been the first all-French victory in the Formula One World Championship[7] as well as the first Formula One victory for a French team[8] and a French engine.

Ligier JS11 2008 Goodwood
The 1980 Ligier JS11/15 being demonstrated at the 2008 Goodwood Festival of Speed.
Andrea de Cesaris 1984 Dallas
Ligier used a turbo engine for the first time in 1984. Andrea de Cesaris drives the JS23 chassis at that year's Dallas Grand Prix.
Ligier JS43
Ligier's last F1 car, the JS43, on display. Driven by Olivier Panis and Pedro Diniz, it provided Panis's only F1 victory and Ligier's last, at the 1996 Monaco Grand Prix.

The deal with Matra ceased in 1979 and Ligier built a Cosworth-powered wing-car, the Ligier JS11. The JS11 began the season winning the first two races in the hands of Laffite. However, the JS11 faced serious competition when Williams and Ferrari introduced aerodynamically modified cars. The rest of the season was less successful for the French marque.

The JS11 and its successors made Ligier one of the top teams through the early 1980s. Despite substantial sponsorship from Talbot and public French companies – mainly SEITA, Gitanes and Française des Jeux[9] – the competitiveness of the team began to decline around 1982. Around this time, they were testing a Matra V6 turbocharged engine, which never raced.[10] Thanks to the political support of Ligier long-time friend François Mitterrand, in the mid-1980s, the team benefitted from a free Renault turbo engine deal. This, along with sponsorship from companies such as Loto and Elf Aquitaine, made the team more competitive, though not a frontrunner. When Renault left the sport in 1986, Ligier was left without a bona fide engine supplier. An abortive collaboration with Alfa Romeo (due to René Arnoux's harsh criticism on the Alfa Romeo engines) was followed by customer engine deals with Megatron (who provided them with rebadged BMW M12 engines), Judd and Cosworth and then works contracts with Lamborghini, Renault and Mugen-Honda.

Between 1987 and 1991, the team struggled, failing to score points in 1988, 1990 and 1991, and at the 1988 San Marino Grand Prix neither René Arnoux nor Stefan Johansson qualified for the race, the first time in team history that neither car made the grid. In 1990, when fellow team Larrousse were disqualified after claiming their chassis was built by themselves, while in fact it was built by Lola Cars, Ligier moved up into 10th place in the Constructors' Championship, which gave them subsidized travel benefits, despite actually not being classified due a to lack of points.

In 1993 the team enjoyed an upswing when Guy Ligier sold the team to Cyril de Rouvre after a disappointing 1992 season when they once again failed to fulfil their potential despite being supplied with the same works Renault engines as the dominant Williams team. Surprisingly, the team was somewhat more competitive during this period, in part due to the talents of aerodynamicist Frank Dernie and engineer Loïc Bigois. They scored eight podium finishes over the next four years, contrasting sharply with their failure to secure a single top three position between 1987 and 1992. In the last years Ligier had little public support and lacked funds.

In 1994, de Rouvre sold the team to Flavio Briatore and Tom Walkinshaw. Other organisations bidded to purchase Ligier, including a consortium consisting of Hughes de Chaunac and Philippe Streiff[11], with the support of the similarly Renault-powered Williams F1 team, who intended to turn Ligier into a 'junior' team. The Mugen-Honda-powered JS43 turned out to be a well balanced car, if not on par with the Williams entries. It became a surprise winner as well, with the team taking the chequered flag with Olivier Panis at the Monaco Grand Prix, albeit in a race of heavy attrition, with only three cars finishing. It was the first "all-French" victory at Monaco since René Dreyfus in Bugatti in 1930. This ended a nearly fifteen-year-long winless-streak for the Ligier team, the longest of any uninterruptedly existing team between two wins (some teams like Honda or Mercedes had much longer periods between two wins, but did not exist as a Grand Prix team for most of their respective periods between two wins).

The Ligier name last appeared in Formula One at the 1996 Japanese Grand Prix. At the end of the season the team was sold to Alain Prost and became Prost Grand Prix in 1997.

The team traditionally used numbers 25 and 26.

After Formula One

In 2004, Ligier returned to motorsport after acquiring Automobiles Martini. Tico Martini had designed a Formula 3 chassis that was introduced at the 2004 Paris Motor Show[12] as the Ligier JS47, but with the F3 market cornered by Dallara, the car only raced in the minor Recaro F3 Cup.

In 2005 Ligier introduced a "gentlemen driver" sports car, the JS49, a sport prototype[13][14] made for the 2000 cc CN class, which can be used in the V de V Challenge.

Complete Formula One World Championship results

(key) (results in bold indicate pole position; results in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Chassis Engine(s) Tyres Drivers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Points WCC
1976 JS5 Matra MS73 3.0 V12 G BRA RSA USW ESP BEL MON SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN USA JPN 20 6th
France Jacques Laffite Ret Ret 4 12 3 12 4 14 DSQ Ret 2 Ret 3 Ret Ret 7
1977 JS7 Matra MS76 3.0 V12 G ARG BRA RSA USW ESP MON BEL SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA USA CAN JPN 18 8th
France Jacques Laffite NC Ret Ret 9 7 7 Ret 1 8 6 Ret Ret 2 8 7 Ret 5
France Jean-Pierre Jarier Ret
1978 JS7
JS7/9
JS9
Matra MS76 3.0 V12
Matra MS78 3.0 V12
G ARG BRA RSA USW MON BEL ESP SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA USA CAN 19 6th
France Jacques Laffite 16 9 5 5 Ret 5 3 7 7 10 3 5 8 4 11 Ret
1979 JS11 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG BRA RSA USW ESP BEL MON FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN USA 61 3rd
France Patrick Depailler 4 2 Ret 5 1 Ret 5
Belgium Jacky Ickx Ret 6 Ret Ret 5 Ret Ret Ret
France Jacques Laffite 1 1 Ret Ret Ret 2 Ret 8 Ret 3 3 3 Ret Ret Ret
1980 JS11/15 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG BRA RSA USW BEL MON FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN USA 66 2nd
France Didier Pironi Ret 4 3 6 1 Ret 2 Ret Ret Ret Ret 6 3 3
France Jacques Laffite Ret Ret 2 Ret 11 2 3 Ret 1 4 3 9 8 5
1981 JS17 Matra MS81 3.0 V12 M USW BRA ARG SMR BEL MON ESP FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN CPL 44 4th
France Jean-Pierre Jarier Ret 7
France Jean-Pierre Jabouille DNQ NC Ret DNQ Ret
France Patrick Tambay Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret
France Jacques Laffite Ret 6 Ret Ret 2 3 2 Ret 3 3 1 Ret Ret 1 6
1982 JS17
JS17B
JS19
Matra MS81 3.0 V12 M RSA BRA USW SMR BEL MON DET CAN NED GBR FRA GER AUT SUI ITA CPL 20 8th
United States Eddie Cheever Ret Ret Ret 3 Ret 2 10 DNQ Ret 16 Ret Ret Ret 6 3
France Jacques Laffite Ret Ret Ret 9 Ret 6 Ret Ret Ret 14 Ret 3 Ret Ret Ret
1983 JS21 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8
Ford Cosworth DFY 3.0 V8
M BRA USW FRA SMR MON BEL DET CAN GBR GER AUT NED ITA EUR RSA 0 NC
France Jean-Pierre Jarier Ret Ret 9 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 10 8 7 Ret 9 Ret 10
Brazil Raul Boesel Ret 7 Ret 9 Ret 13 10 Ret Ret Ret DNQ 10 DNQ 15 NC
1984 JS23 Renault EF4 1.5 V6 t M BRA RSA BEL SMR FRA MON CAN DET DAL GBR GER AUT NED ITA EUR POR 3 10th
France François Hesnault Ret 10 Ret Ret DNS Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 8 8 7 Ret 10 Ret
Italy Andrea de Cesaris Ret 5 Ret 6 10 Ret Ret Ret Ret 10 7 Ret Ret Ret 7 12
1985 JS25 Renault EF4B 1.5 V6 t P BRA POR SMR MON CAN DET FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA BEL EUR RSA AUS 23 6th
Italy Andrea de Cesaris Ret Ret Ret 4 14 10 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret
France Philippe Streiff 10 9 8 3
France Jacques Laffite 6 Ret Ret 6 8 12 Ret 3 3 Ret Ret Ret 11 Ret 2
1986 JS27 Renault EF4B 1.5 V6 t P BRA ESP SMR MON BEL CAN DET FRA GBR GER HUN AUT ITA POR MEX AUS 29 5th
France René Arnoux 4 Ret Ret 5 Ret 6 Ret 5 4 4 Ret 10 Ret 7 15 7
France Jacques Laffite 3 Ret Ret 6 5 7 2 6 Ret
France Philippe Alliot Ret 9 Ret Ret Ret 6 8
1987 JS29B
JS29C
Megatron M12/13 1.5 L4 t G BRA SMR BEL MON DET FRA GBR GER HUN AUT ITA POR ESP MEX JPN AUS 1 11th
France René Arnoux DNS 6 11 10 Ret Ret Ret Ret 10 10 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret
Italy Piercarlo Ghinzani Ret 7 12 Ret Ret EX Ret 12 8 8 Ret Ret Ret 13 Ret
1988 JS31 Judd CV 3.5 V8 G BRA SMR MON MEX CAN DET FRA GBR GER HUN BEL ITA POR ESP JPN AUS 0 NC
France René Arnoux Ret DNQ Ret Ret Ret Ret DNQ 18 17 Ret Ret 13 10 Ret 17 Ret
Sweden Stefan Johansson 9 DNQ Ret 10 Ret Ret DNQ DNQ DNQ Ret 11 DNQ Ret Ret DNQ 9
1989 JS33 Ford Cosworth DFR 3.5 V8 G BRA SMR MON MEX USA CAN FRA GBR GER HUN BEL ITA POR ESP JPN AUS 3 13th
France René Arnoux DNQ DNQ 12 14 DNQ 5 Ret DNQ 11 DNQ Ret 9 13 DNQ DNQ Ret
France Olivier Grouillard 9 DSQ Ret 8 DNQ DNQ 6 7 Ret DNQ 13 Ret DNQ Ret Ret Ret
1990 JS33B Ford Cosworth DFR 3.5 V8 G USA BRA SMR MON CAN MEX FRA GBR GER HUN BEL ITA POR ESP JPN AUS 0 NC
Italy Nicola Larini Ret 11 10 Ret Ret 16 14 10 10 11 14 11 10 7 7 10
France Philippe Alliot EX 12 9 Ret Ret 18 9 13 DSQ 14 DNQ 13 Ret Ret 10 11
1991 JS35
JS35B
Lamborghini 3512 3.5 V12 G USA BRA SMR MON CAN MEX FRA GBR GER HUN BEL ITA POR ESP JPN AUS 0 NC
Belgium Thierry Boutsen Ret Ret 7 7 Ret 8 12 Ret 9 17 11 Ret 16 Ret 9 Ret
France Érik Comas DNQ Ret 10 10 8 DNQ 11 DNQ Ret 10 Ret 11 11 Ret Ret 18
1992 JS37 Renault RS3B 3.5 V10
Renault RS3C 3.5 V10
G RSA MEX BRA ESP SMR MON CAN FRA GBR GER HUN BEL ITA POR JPN AUS 6 8th
Belgium Thierry Boutsen Ret 10 Ret Ret Ret 12 10 Ret 10 7 Ret Ret Ret 8 Ret 5
France Érik Comas 7 9 Ret Ret 9 10 6 5 8 6 Ret DNQ Ret Ret Ret Ret
1993 JS39 Renault RS5 3.5 V10 G RSA BRA EUR SMR ESP MON CAN FRA GBR GER HUN BEL ITA POR JPN AUS 23 5th
United Kingdom Martin Brundle Ret Ret Ret 3 Ret 6 5 5 14 8 5 7 Ret 6 9 6
United Kingdom Mark Blundell 3 5 Ret Ret 7 Ret Ret Ret 7 3 7 11 Ret Ret 7 9
1994 JS39B Renault RS6 3.5 V10 G BRA PAC SMR MON ESP CAN FRA GBR GER HUN BEL ITA POR EUR JPN AUS 13 6th
France Éric Bernard Ret 10 12 Ret 8 13 Ret 13 3 10 10 7 10
United Kingdom Johnny Herbert 8
France Franck Lagorce Ret 11
France Olivier Panis 11 9 11 9 7 12 Ret 12 2 6 7 10 DSQ 9 11 5
1995 JS41 Mugen-Honda MF-301 3.0 V10 G BRA ARG SMR ESP MON CAN FRA GBR GER HUN BEL ITA POR EUR PAC JPN AUS 24 5th
Japan Aguri Suzuki 8 Ret 11 6 Ret DNS
United Kingdom Martin Brundle 9 Ret 10 4 Ret Ret 3 Ret 8 7 Ret
France Olivier Panis Ret 7 9 6 Ret 4 8 4 Ret 6 9 Ret Ret Ret 8 5 2
1996 JS43 Mugen-Honda MF-301 HA 3.0 V10 G AUS BRA ARG EUR SMR MON ESP CAN FRA GBR GER HUN BEL ITA POR JPN 15 6th
France Olivier Panis 7 6 8 Ret Ret 1 Ret Ret 7 Ret 7 5 Ret Ret 10 7
Brazil Pedro Diniz 10 8 Ret 10 7 Ret 6 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 6 Ret Ret

Notes

  1. ^ "Case History". Corktree.tripod.com. Retrieved 4 February 2014.
  2. ^ "GP Encyclopedia – Constructors – Ligier (Equipe Ligier)". Grandprix.com. 10 March 2007. Retrieved 24 October 2009.
  3. ^ "Corporate". Ligier.fr (in French). Retrieved 1 August 2014.
  4. ^ "1969 – 1970 Ligier JS1 – Images, Specifications and Information". Ultimatecarpage.com. Retrieved 24 October 2009.
  5. ^ "1971 Ligier JS3 Cosworth – Images, Specifications and Information". Ultimatecarpage.com. 23 November 2004. Retrieved 24 October 2009.
  6. ^ "Le Mans Register – 1975". Formula2.net. Retrieved 24 October 2009.
  7. ^ Team, car, engine and driver were French. The gearbox was British (Hewland) and the tyres American (Goodyear). Jean-Pierre Jabouille and Renault achieved victory at the 1979 French Grand Prix with an all-Renault car and Michelin tyres.
  8. ^ Jackie Stewart achieved victory at the 1968 Dutch Grand Prix with a French Matra MS10 car, but the car was entered by the British Matra International team.
  9. ^ Dupuis, Jérôme (17 October 1996). "L'Etat gaspilleur" [The Wasteful State]. L'Express (in French). Retrieved 7 March 2010.
  10. ^ "6th Gear – Years in Gear – Grand Prix cars that never raced". Forix.com. Retrieved 4 February 2014.
  11. ^ "The remarkable story of Philippe Streiff". 24 February 2014. Retrieved 24 January 2019.
  12. ^ "News channel". Motorsport.com. Retrieved 24 October 2009.
  13. ^ Sam Collins (29 November 2007). "Ligier JS49 VdeV CN | Sportscar". Racecar Engineering. Archived from the original on 1 October 2009. Retrieved 24 October 2009.
  14. ^ "Ligier JS49". www.frenchrendezvous.cc. Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 29 September 2018. ‹See Tfd›(in French)

External links

1976 Belgian Grand Prix

The 1976 Belgian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Zolder, near Heusden-Zolder in Belgium on 16 May 1976. The race was the fifth round of the 1976 Formula One season. It was the 34th Belgian Grand Prix and the third to be held at Circuit Zolder. Zolder was a replacement venue as Nivelles-Baulers near Brussels was due to host the race in rotation with Zolder but the track surface at Nivelles had deteriorated and Zolder would host the race until the return of Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps in 1983. The race was held over 70 laps of the 4.3-kilometre circuit for a total race distance of 298 kilometres.

The race was won by Ferrari driver, Niki Lauda driving a Ferrari 312T2, who increased his lead in the World Drivers' Championship to 29 points by doing so. His Swiss teammate, Clay Regazzoni, finished the race in second position, 3.4 seconds behind Lauda. Third was taken by French driver Jacques Laffite driving a Ligier JS5. It was Lauda's fourth win of the year in what was a dominant display by the reigning champion. Laffite's third place was his second podium after finishing second in the 1975 German Grand Prix the previous year and the first such finish for the new Equipe Ligier team.

2001 Japanese Grand Prix

The 2001 Japanese Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 14 October 2001 at the Suzuka Circuit. It was the seventeenth and final race of the 2001 Formula One season. It was the 27th running of the Japanese Grand Prix and the 17th held at Suzuka.

The race was won by the World Champion, German driver Michael Schumacher driving a Ferrari F2001 after starting from pole position. It was Schumacher's fourth victory in the Japanese Grand Prix (expanding his own record), his third for Ferrari and his ninth for the 2001 season. Schumacher won by three seconds over Colombian driver Juan Pablo Montoya in a Williams FW23. Third was taken by British driver David Coulthard in a McLaren MP4-16, having overtaken his teammate Mika Häkkinen late in the race. Rubens Barrichello (Ferrari F2001) and Ralf Schumacher (Williams FW23) completed the points finishers.

Schumacher set a new record for points in a season with 123 and biggest point margin to second-placed Coulthard with 58.

Enrique Bernoldi (Arrows A22) and Alex Yoong (Minardi PS01B) started the race from the pit lane. The race marked Jean Alesi's 201st and last Formula One race after a fourteen-year career. Kimi Räikkönen (Sauber C20) spun off on lap five, forcing Alesi (Jordan EJ11) off in avoidance at the Dunlop Curve (Turn 7). It was Alesi's only retirement of the season. It was, additionally, the last race for the French Prost Grand Prix team as they went bankrupt and closed down during the following off-season. It brought an end to the team which began as Equipe Ligier 32 years earlier and 26 years of Formula One racing. Mika Häkkinen scored his last ever World Championship points at this race.

ADESS AG

Advanced Design and Engineering Systems Solutions or ADESS is a racecar constructor based in Munich, Germany.

Gauloises

Gauloises (pronounced [ɡo.lwaz]), "Gaul women" in French ("cigarette" is feminine in French), is a brand of cigarette of French manufacture. It is produced by the company Imperial Tobacco following its acquisition of Altadis in January 2008 in most countries, but produced and sold by Reemtsma in Germany.

Guy Ligier

Guy Camille Ligier (12 July 1930 – 23 August 2015) was a French racing driver and team owner. He maintained many varied and successful careers over the course of his life, including a racing driver and Formula One team owner.

Jacques Laffite

Jacques-Henri Laffite (born 21 November 1943 in Paris) is a French former racing driver who competed in Formula One from 1974 to 1986. He achieved six Grand Prix wins, all while driving for the Ligier team. From 1997 to 2013, Laffite was a presenter for TF1.

Jean-Pierre Jarier

Jean-Pierre Jacques Jarier (born 10 July 1946) is a French former Grand Prix racing driver. He drove for several notable Formula One teams including Shadow, Team Lotus, Ligier and Tyrrell Racing. His best finish was third (three times) and he also took three pole positions.

Ligier JS19

The Ligier JS19 was a Formula One racing car manufactured and raced by Equipe Ligier during the 1982 Formula One season. Powered by a Talbot-badged Matra V12 engine, the JS19 was driven by Jacques Laffite and Eddie Cheever.

Ligier JS21

The Ligier JS21 was a Formula One racing car manufactured and raced by Ligier during the 1983 Formula One season. Powered by a Cosworth V8 engine while the majority of teams used turbo power, the team failed to score any points.

Ligier JS23

The Ligier JS23 was a Formula One car designed by Michel Beaujon and Claude Galopin for the Ligier team for use in the 1984 Formula One season. The car was powered by a turbocharged Renault V6 engine and ran on Michelin tyres. Drivers of the car during 1984 were François Hesnault and Andrea de Cesaris.

1984 wasn't a successful year for Ligier with de Cesaris scoring all three points Ligier earned meaning the French team finished 9th in the Constructors Championship. De Cesaris actually scored the three points with a 5th place at the 2nd race of the season in South Africa and a 6th place two races later in San Marino.

The JS23 was replaced for the 1985 season by the Ligier JS25.

Ligier JS25

The Ligier JS25 was a Formula One car designed by Michel Beaujon and Claude Galopin for use by the Ligier team during the 1985 Formula One season. Like its predecessor, the JS23, the JS25 was powered by a turbocharged Renault V6 engine although the car ran on Pirelli instead of Michelin tyres after the French company pulled out of Grand Prix racing at the end of 1984. Drivers of the car were initially their 1984 driver Andrea de Cesaris and veteran Jacques Laffite who returned to the team after two fruitless years at Williams, but after a series of crashes, de Cesaris was fired by team boss Guy Ligier and replaced by Philippe Streiff.

Using the JS25, the French team were able to score 23 points in 1985 and finished 6th in the Constructors Championship. Laffite was able to score two 3rd-place finishes and also a 2nd place at the season ending Australian Grand Prix where team mate Streiff also managed to finish 3rd, although his efforts to take 2nd from Laffite almost cause both cars to not finish the race. Streiff made contact with Laffite on the penultimate lap of the race and drove the last with his left front wheel almost off the car.

Easily the most spectacular moment for the JS25 came at the Austrian Grand Prix when de Cesaris (aptly nicknamed "de Crasheris") destroyed his car in a high-speed rollover on lap 14. The team had not yet seen the accident on the television monitors when de Cesaris returned to the pits and he merely told them that the car had stalled and could not restart it, causing the team to be shocked when they finally saw the crash on replay. It was after this event that team owner Guy Ligier decided he could no longer afford the repair bills for de Cesaris's frequent crashes, stating "I can no longer afford to employ this man" (this was despite the Italian's personal sponsor Marlboro paying the bulk of his salary, ironically, Marlboro pulled their sponsorship from de Cesaris after this). He was replaced by Streiff after the next race in the Netherlands.

Ironically, Streiff was almost the cause of the team missing out on what would prove to be their best result of the season. In the final race of the season in Australia, Laffite and Streiff were headed for a safe 2nd and 3rd respectively behind race winner Keke Rosberg's Williams-Honda. On the penultimate lap, Streiff tried to overtake his team-mate for second place with almost disastrous results as the two cars collided. As a result, Streiff's front wheel axle was severely damaged. While Laffite carried on in second, Streiff managed to limp his JS25 home and retain third place despite only have three wheels firmly attached to the car, with the front left wheel bouncing up and down over the course of the last lap, but somehow remaining attached to the car. It would remain a career best finish for Streiff. Guy Ligier, not impressed that Streiff had almost taken out both team cars at the end of the race when they were both assured of a podium finish, would not offer the Frenchman a drive for 1986 as a result.

The JS25 was replaced for the 1986 season by the Ligier JS27.

Ligier JS27

The Ligier JS27 was the Formula One car used by French team Ligier team competed in the 1986 season.

Ligier JS33

The Ligier JS33 was a Formula One car used by the Ligier team during the 1989 Formula One season. Its best finish in a race was fifth, at the 1989 Canadian Grand Prix. The JS33 was updated to a 'B' spec for use in the following season, but failed to score any points for the team.

Ligier JS35

The Ligier JS35 was a Formula One car used by the Ligier team during the 1991 Formula One season. It was updated to a 'B' spec during the season. Its best finish in a race was seventh (twice).

Ligier JS4

The Ligier JS4 is a four-wheeled, two-seater microcar manufactured from 1980 to 1983 by Ligier, the street vehicle branch of French Formula One manufacturer Equipe Ligier. It marked a change in Ligier's priorities as they had recently ended manufacture of the Ligier JS2 sports car. It is a "Voiture sans permit", a light vehicle which did not require a driver's license and was thus popular with the elderly, the young, or with those who had lost theirs. It was first presented on 25 July 1980.

Ligier JS5

The Ligier JS5 was the first Formula One racing car made by Ligier. Designed by Gérard Ducarouge, it competed in the 1976 Formula One season, gaining 20 points and getting sixth place overall in the Constructor's Championship. The car also gave its driver Jacques Laffite and Ligier their first ever pole position at the 1976 Italian Grand Prix at Monza.

Ligier JS9

The Ligier JS9 was a Formula One racing car manufactured and raced by Ligier during the 1978 Formula One season. Driven by Frenchman Jacques Laffite, its best finish was third (twice).

Ligier JS P2

The Ligier JS P2 is a racing car designed and built by French manufacturer Onroak Automotive and named in partnership with French former racing driver Guy Ligier. Designed for the Le Mans Prototype 2 (LMP2) regulations, it is intended as a second option to Onroak's Morgan LMP2 that has been competing since 2012. As well as being the first closed-cockpit car offered by Onroak, it is also the first car they designed entirely in-house. The JS P2 debuted at the 2014 24 Hours of Le Mans, and has been campaigned in the FIA World Endurance Championship, European Le Mans Series, Asian Le Mans Series and United SportsCar Championship.

Prost Grand Prix

Prost Grand Prix was a Formula One racing team owned and managed by four-time Formula One world champion Alain Prost. The team participated in five seasons from 1997 to 2001.

France Ligier
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