Entertainment Weekly

Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated as EW) is an American magazine, published by Meredith Corporation, that covers film, television, music, Broadway theatre, books and popular culture.

Different from celebrity-focused publications like Us Weekly, People (a sister magazine to EW), and In Touch Weekly, EW primarily concentrates on entertainment media news and critical reviews. However, unlike Variety and The Hollywood Reporter, which are aimed at industry insiders, EW targets a more general audience.

Entertainment Weekly
Entertainment Weekly logo
EW-Issue 1-Feb1990
Volume 1, Number 1 (February 16, 1990), cover featuring singer k.d. lang
EditorHenry Goldblatt[1]
Former editorsRick Tetzeli,[2] Jess Cagle, Matt Bean[1]
CategoriesEntertainment
FrequencyWeekly
Total circulation
(2013)
1.8 million[3]
FounderDavid Morris
First issueFebruary 16, 1990
CompanyMeredith Corporation
CountryUnited States
Based inNew York City, New York, U.S.
LanguageEnglish
Websiteew.com
ISSN1049-0434
OCLC number21114137

History

The first issue was published on February 16, 1990.[4][5]

Created by Jeff Jarvis and founded by Michael Klingensmith, who served as publisher until October 1996,[6] the magazine's original television advertising soliciting pre-publication subscribers portrayed it as a consumer guide to popular culture, including movies, music, and book reviews, sometimes with video game and stage reviews, too. ("the post-modern Farmers' Almanac").

In 1996, the magazine won the coveted National Magazine Award for General Excellence from the American Society of Magazine Editors. EW won the same award again in 2002.[7]

In September 2016, in collaboration with People, Entertainment Weekly launched the People/Entertainment Weekly Network. The network is "a free, ad-supported online-video network carries short- and long-form programming covering celebrities, pop culture, lifestyle and human-interest stories". It was rebranded as PeopleTV in September 2017.[8]

Typical content and frequency

The magazine features celebrities on the cover and addresses topics such as television ratings, movie grosses, production costs, concert ticket sales, ad budgets, and in-depth articles about scheduling, producers, showrunners, etc.

It publishes several "double issues" each year (usually in January, May, June and/or August) that are available on newsstands for two weeks. The magazine numbers its issues sequentially, it counts each double issue as "two" issues so that it can fulfil its marketing claim of 52 issues per year for subscribers.

Layout

Entertainment Weekly follows a typical magazine format by featuring a letters to the editor and table of contents in the first few pages, while also featuring advertisements. While many advertisements are unrelated to the entertainment industry, the majority of ads are typically related to up-and-coming television, film or music events.

News and notes

These beginning articles open the magazine and as a rule focus on current events in pop culture. The whole section typically runs eight to ten pages long, and features short news articles, as well as several specific recurring sections:

  • "Sound Bites" usually opens the magazine. It’s a collage of media personalities; actors, presenters or comedians, alongside their recent memorable quotes in speech bubble form.
  • "The Must List" is a two-page spread highlighting ten things (books, movies, songs, etc.) that the staff loves from the week; it usually features one pick from EW readers.
  • "First Look", subtitled "An early peek at some of Hollywood's coolest projects", is a two-page spread with behind-the-scenes or publicity stills of upcoming movies, television episodes or music events.
  • "The Hit List", written each week by critic Scott Brown, highlights ten major events, with short comedic commentaries by Brown. Typically, there will be some continuity to the commentaries. This column was originally written by Jim Mullen and featured twenty events each week, and Dalton Ross later wrote an abbreviated version.
  • "The Hollywood Insider" is a one-page section that reports breaking news in entertainment. It gives details, in the separate columns, on the most-current news in television, movie and music.
  • "The Style Report" is a one-page section devoted to celebrity style. Because its focus is on celebrity fashion or lifestyle, it is graphically rich in nature, featuring many photographs or other images. Recently, the page converted to a new format: five pictures of celebrity fashions for the week, graded on the magazine's review "A"-to-"F" scale (see Reviews section below). A spin-off section, "Style Hunter", which finds reader-requested articles of clothing or accessories that have appeared in pop culture recently, appears frequently.
  • "The Monitor" is a two-page spread devoted to major events in celebrity lives with small paragraphs highlighting events such as weddings, illnesses, arrests, court appearances, and deaths. Deaths of major celebrities are typically detailed in a one-half- or full-page obituary titled "Legacy". This feature is nearly identical to sister publication People's "Passages" feature.
  • The "celebrity" column, the final section of "News and Notes", is devoted to a different column each week, written by two of the magazine's more-prominent writers:
    • "The Final Cut" is written by former executive editor and author Mark Harris. Harris' column focuses on analyzing current popular-culture events, and is generally the most serious of the columns. Harris has written about the writer's strike and the 2008 presidential election, among other topics.
    • "Binge Thinking" was written by screenwriter Diablo Cody. After several profiles of Cody in the months leading up to and following the release of her debut film, Juno (2007), she was hired to write a column detailing her unique view of the entertainment business.
    • If You Ask Me..." Libby Gelman-Waxer (Paul Rudnick) was brought in to write his former Premiere column for Entertainment Weekly in 2011.[9]

Feature articles

There are typically four to six major articles (one to two pages each) within the middle pages of the magazine. These articles are most commonly interviews, but there are also narrative articles as well as lists. Feature articles tend to focus mostly on movies, music and television and less on books and the theatre. In the magazine's history, there have only been a few cover stories (e.g., John Grisham, Stephen King) devoted to authors; there has never been a cover solely devoted to the theater.

Reviews

There are seven sections of reviews in the back pages of each issue (together encompassing up to one half of the magazine's pages). In addition to reviews, each reviews section has a top-sellers list, as well as numerous sidebars with interviews or small features. Unlike a number of European magazines that give their ratings with a number of stars (with normally 4 or 5 stars for the best review), EW grades the reviews academic-style, so that the highest reviews will get a letter grade of "A" and the lowest reviews get an "F", with plus or minus graduations in between assigned to each letter except "F".

The sections are:

"Movies"
Typically features all the major releases for that weekend, as well as several independent and foreign films that have also been released. Chris Nashawaty is the primary film critic. "Critical Mass" was a table of the grades that have also been given by a number of noted movie reviewers in the American press (such as Ty Burr from The Boston Globe, Todd McCarthy from Variety and Roger Ebert from the Chicago Sun-Times). Also eliminated from this section was the box-office figures from the previous weekend and some sort of infographic. The A+ rating is rarely awarded by EW. Two films to have received it are Citizen Kane and My Left Foot (1989). DVDs are now profiled in the one-page "Movies on DVD" section that follows. Longtime critic Lisa Schwarzbaum left the magazine in 2013, and critic Owen Gleiberman was let go after a round of layoffs in spring 2014.[10] In 2015 it started publishing the scores of movies from Metacritic, Rotten Tomatoes, and IMDb under "Critical Mass."
"Television"
Features reviews by critics Darren Franich and Kristen Baldwin for made-for-television films and new television program or series, as well as some television specials. The section no longer includes the Nielsen ratings for the previous week. On the following page is typically a "TV on DVD" section, profiling releases of television films and specials or complete seasons of television shows. Current Reviewers include Melissa Maerz.
"What to Watch"
Currently written by Ray Rahman, features brief, one- or two-sentence reviews of several television programs on each night of the week, as well as one slightly longer review, usually written by someone else, with a letter grade.
"Music"
Reviews major album releases for the week, divided by genre. There is also typically at least one interview or feature, as well as a section called "Download This", highlighting several singles available for download from the Internet.
"Books"
Features reviews of books released during the week. Sometimes, authors will write guest reviews of other works. There is also typically one interview or spotlight feature in this section per issue. Bestseller lists appear at the end of this section.
"Theater"*
Reviews productions currently playing, listed by the city where they are running.
"Games"*
Reviews current video game releases.
"Tech"*
Reviews new websites and products, and profiles current Internet or technology phenomena.
* Not in every issue.

The Bullseye

This section occupies the back page of the magazine, rating the "hits" and "misses" from the past week's events in popular culture on a bullseye graphic. For example, the May 22, 2009, edition featured Justin Timberlake hosting Saturday Night Live in the center, while the then-drama between Eminem and Mariah Carey missed the target completely for being "very 2002". At the time when this was printed on a small part of a page, events that were greatly disliked were shown several pages away.

Specialty issues

Every year the magazine publishes several specialty issues. These issues are often published as double issues (running for two consecutive weeks). Many times these features are so long that they replace all other feature articles.

Common specialty issues include:

  • Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter Preview issues: Generally each quarter the magazine reports on upcoming releases in movies, music, television, live shows and books. Typically the summer issue's focus will be on upcoming movies only unless major television series or events, music releases or book releases are occurring then.
  • The Photo issue: Once a year, an issue is dedicated to featuring (aside from the normal reviews and news content) only photographs of celebrities. Unlike tabloid issues, these photographs done with the celebrities' cooperation, and often they use some form of artistic expression. A wide variety of celebrities have been used, including Green Day, Reese Witherspoon, Morrissey, the cast of the television series Arrested Development, Tobey Maguire and Cameron Diaz. Generally, the photographs will contain some descriptive text, sometimes about the person or sometimes a commentary from the photographers who photographed them for a story.
  • Academy Awards issues: In the past the magazine devoted at least four cover stories per year to the Academy Awards; "The Oscar Race Begins" issue in January predicts the nominees, the "Nominees" issue in February profiles the recently announced Oscar contenders, the "Oscar Odds" issue predicts the winners the week before the awards, and the "After-Awards" issue covers the ceremony the week after it airs. Virtually every issue mentions the Oscars in some capacity, often on the cover, and a film or actor's Academy-Award chances are often noted in the magazine's reviews. In comparison, music's Grammy Awards, television's Emmy Awards, and theater's Tony Awards are given relatively limited coverage.
  • The "Must List": A double-sized issue that is usually timed for release in the last week of June. It focuses on what the magazine considers "musts" in entertainment with the latest hot movies, TV shows, music projects and novels along with previews of upcoming projects in those media that are gaining interest.
  • The Fall TV Preview issue: Generally released in early September, this issue has the magazine detailing the upcoming fall season of both new and returning series.
  • End-of-the-Year issue: The last issue of each year, whose cover shows the "Entertainer of the Year" chosen by readers at EW's official website. The issue features the ten-best releases in theater, film, television, music, DVD, literature and (as of last year) fashion that year. Music, television and film have two critics give their top ten; the others only have one. Each section also has a five-worst list (film is the only section in which both critics give the worst). Also in the issue are special sections devoted to the Entertainer of the Year, great performances, newly arrived stars, a timeline of infamous celebrity mishaps, and obituaries of stars who died (this used to be in a separate issue; it was combined with the "end-of-the-year" issue in 2003). This is the only issue without any reviews.
The complete list of the annual "Entertainer of the Year" winners:

Thousandth issue and redesign

The 1,000th issue was released July 4, 2008, and included the magazine's top-100 list for movies, television shows, music videos, songs, Broadway shows, and technology of the past 25 years (1983–2008).

As of its 1,001st issue, EW drastically revamped the look, feel and content of the publication—increasing font and picture sizes and making all columns' word count shorter.

Website

The magazine's website EW.com provides users with daily content, breaking news, blogs, TV recpas, original video programming, entertainment exclusives and serves as an archive for past magazine interviews, columns and photos. Along with a website, they also have a radio station on Sirius XM.[11]

In April 2011, EW.com was ranked as the seventh most popular Entertainment News property in the United States by comScore Media Metrix.[12]

Poppy Awards

Previously named the EWwy Awards, the Poppy Awards was created by Entertainment Weekly to honor worthy actors and series not nominated for the Primetime Emmys.[13] The Poppys are awarded in ten categories and no person nominated for an equivalent Primetime Emmy is eligible. Votes and nominations are cast online by anyone who chooses to participate. The categories are: Best Drama Series; Best Comedy Series; Best Actor in a Drama Series; Best Actor in a Comedy Series; Best Actress in a Drama Series; Best Actress in a Comedy Series; Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series; Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series; Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series; and Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series.

Notable former contributors

References

  1. ^ a b "Henry Goldblatt, a longtime veteran at EW moving back to his old job as editor". New York Post. Jan 30, 2015.
  2. ^ "EW Loses Its Top Editor". New York Post. January 7, 2009. Retrieved June 23, 2018.
  3. ^ "New York Times". The New York Times. Retrieved February 10, 2014.
  4. ^ "Top 100 U.S. Magazines by Circulation" (PDF). PSA Research Center. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  5. ^ Sumner, David E.; Rhoades, Shirrel (2006). Magazines: A Complete Guide to the Industry. Peter Lang. p. 142. ISBN 978-0-8204-7617-9. Retrieved April 10, 2016.
  6. ^ "Mag Bag". Media Daily News. October 26, 2007.
  7. ^ "Winners and Finalists Database | ASME". www.magazine.org. Retrieved 2017-05-23.
  8. ^ Spangler, Todd. "'PeopleTV' Is New Name of Time Inc.'s Celeb and Entertainment Online Network". Variety. Retrieved April 12, 2018.
  9. ^ "Ask Libby". Entertainment Weekly. 13 January 2012. Retrieved January 2, 2017.
  10. ^ "EW Lays Off Longtime Film Critic Owen Gleiberman in Staff Purge". The Hollywood Reporter. April 2, 2014.
  11. ^ "Entertainment Weekly Radio - The latest In Pop Culture News - SiriusXM Radio". siriusxm.com. Retrieved 2 January 2017.
  12. ^ "ew.com at WI. Entertainment Weekly: TV Recaps, Movie & Music News - EW.com". informer.com. Retrieved 2 January 2017.
  13. ^ Bierly, Mandy (September 14, 2008). "'Mad Men,' 'John Adams,' Win Big at Creative Arts Emmys". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on June 24, 2011.

Further reading

External links

Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., or simply Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., is an American television series created for ABC by Joss Whedon, Jed Whedon, and Maurissa Tancharoen, based on the Marvel Comics organization S.H.I.E.L.D. (Strategic Homeland Intervention, Enforcement, and Logistics Division), a fictional peacekeeping and spy agency in a world of superheroes. It is set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), sharing continuity with the films and other television series of the franchise. The series is produced by ABC Studios, Marvel Television, and Mutant Enemy Productions, with Jed Whedon, Tancharoen, and Jeffrey Bell serving as showrunners.

The series revolves around the character of Phil Coulson, with Clark Gregg reprising his role from the film series, and his team of S.H.I.E.L.D. agents, who must deal with various unusual cases and enemies, including Hydra, the Inhumans, Life Model Decoys, and alien species such as the Kree. Joss Whedon began developing a S.H.I.E.L.D. pilot following the success of his film The Avengers, and Gregg was confirmed to reprise his role in October 2012. The series was officially picked up by ABC in May 2013, and also stars Ming-Na Wen, Brett Dalton, Chloe Bennet, Iain De Caestecker and Elizabeth Henstridge, with Nick Blood, Adrianne Palicki, Henry Simmons, Luke Mitchell, John Hannah, Natalia Cordova-Buckley, and Jeff Ward joining in later seasons. Prosthetic makeup is created with Glenn Hetrick's Optic Nerve Studios, while Legacy Effects contributes other practical effects. The visual effects for the series are created by FuseFX, and have been nominated for multiple awards. Several episodes directly crossover with films or other television series set in the MCU, while other characters from MCU films and Marvel One-Shots also appear throughout the series.

The first season originally aired from September 24, 2013, to May 13, 2014, while the second season aired from September 23, 2014, to May 12, 2015. A third season premiered on September 29, 2015, concluding on May 17, 2016, and the fourth season premiered on September 20, 2016, and concluded on May 16, 2017. A fifth season of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. premiered on December 1, 2017 and concluded on May 18, 2018. In May 2018, the series was renewed for a sixth season, intended to premiere in May 2019. In November 2018, ahead of the sixth season's release, the series was renewed for a seventh season. After starting the first season with high ratings but mixed reviews, the ratings began to drop while reviews improved. This led to much lower but more consistent ratings, as well as more consistently positive reviews in the subsequent seasons.

Several characters created for the series have since been introduced to the comic universe and other media. A spin-off series, centered on Blood and Palicki's characters Lance Hunter and Bobbi Morse and titled Marvel's Most Wanted, received a pilot order in August 2015, but it was ultimately passed on in May 2016. An online digital series, Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.: Slingshot, centered on Elena "Yo-Yo" Rodriguez, was launched in December 2016 on ABC.com.

American Horror Story

American Horror Story (sometimes abbreviated as AHS) is an American anthology horror television series created by Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk. Each season is conceived as a self-contained miniseries, following a different set of characters and settings, and a storyline with its own "beginning, middle, and end." Some plot elements of each season are loosely inspired by true events. The only actors to be present in all iterations are Evan Peters and Sarah Paulson with Lily Rabe and Frances Conroy appearing in all but one of the seasons each.

The first season, retroactively subtitled Murder House, takes place in Los Angeles, California, during the year 2011, and centers on a family that moves into a house haunted by its deceased former occupants. The second season, subtitled Asylum, takes place in Massachusetts during the year 1964, and follows the stories of the patients and staff of an institution for the criminally insane. The third season, subtitled Coven, takes place in New Orleans, Louisiana, during the year 2013, and follows a coven of witches who face off against those who wish to destroy them. The fourth season, subtitled Freak Show, takes place in Jupiter, Florida, during the year 1952, and centers around one of the last remaining American freak shows and their struggle for survival. The fifth season, subtitled Hotel, takes place in Los Angeles, California, during the year 2015, and focuses on the staff and guests of a supernatural hotel. The sixth season, subtitled Roanoke, takes place in North Carolina during the years 2014–2016, and focuses on the paranormal events that take place at an isolated farmhouse haunted by the deceased Roanoke colony. The seventh season, subtitled Cult, takes place in the fictional suburb of Brookfield Heights, Michigan, during the year 2017, and centers on a cult terrorizing the residents in the aftermath of the 2016 U.S. presidential election. The eighth season, subtitled Apocalypse, takes place in California during the years 2018-2021 and features the return of the witches from Coven as they battle the Antichrist from Murder House, Michael Langdon, and attempt to prevent the apocalypse.

The series is broadcast on the cable television channel FX in the United States. On January 12, 2017, the series was renewed for a ninth season, with a two-season renewal alongside Apocalypse. On August 3, 2018, the series was greenlit for a tenth season.Although reception to individual seasons has varied, American Horror Story largely has been well received by television critics, with the majority of the praise going towards the cast, particularly Jessica Lange, who won two Emmy Awards, a Golden Globe Award, and a Screen Actors Guild Award for her performances. Kathy Bates and James Cromwell each won an Emmy Award for their performances, while Lady Gaga won a Golden Globe Award. The series draws consistently high ratings for the FX network, with its first season being the most-viewed new cable series of 2011.

Arrested Development (TV series)

Arrested Development is an American television sitcom created by Mitchell Hurwitz, which originally aired on Fox for three seasons from November 2, 2003, to February 10, 2006. The show follows the Bluth family, a formerly wealthy dysfunctional family. It is presented in a serialized format, incorporating handheld camera work, voice-over narration, archival photos, and historical footage. The show also maintains numerous running gags and catchphrases. Ron Howard serves as both an executive producer and the omniscient narrator. Set in Newport Beach, California, Arrested Development was filmed primarily in Culver City and Marina del Rey.The series received critical acclaim, six Primetime Emmy Awards, and one Golden Globe Award, and attracted a cult following. It has been named one of the greatest TV shows by publications including Time, Entertainment Weekly, and IGN. It influenced later single-camera comedy series such as 30 Rock and Community.Despite critical acclaim, Arrested Development received low ratings and viewership on Fox, which canceled the series in 2006. In 2011, Netflix agreed to license new episodes and distribute them exclusively on its video streaming service. These episodes were released in May 2013. Netflix commissioned a fifth season of Arrested Development, the first half of which premiered in May 2018.

Fear the Walking Dead

Fear the Walking Dead is an American post-apocalyptic horror drama television series created by Robert Kirkman and Dave Erickson, that premiered on AMC on August 23, 2015. It is a companion series and prequel to The Walking Dead, which is based on the comic book series of the same name by Robert Kirkman, Tony Moore, and Charlie Adlard.

In July 2018, AMC renewed the series for a fifth season, which is set to premiere in 2019. Andrew Chambliss and Ian Goldberg have been the showrunners since the fourth season.

Game of Thrones

Game of Thrones is an American fantasy drama television series created by David Benioff and D. B. Weiss. It is an adaptation of A Song of Ice and Fire, George R. R. Martin's series of fantasy novels, the first of which is A Game of Thrones. It is filmed in Belfast and elsewhere in Northern Ireland, Canada, Croatia, Iceland, Malta, Morocco, Scotland, Spain, and the United States. The series premiered on HBO in the United States on April 17, 2011, and its seventh season ended on August 27, 2017. The series will conclude with its eighth season premiering on April 14, 2019.Set on the fictional continents of Westeros and Essos, Game of Thrones has several plots and a large ensemble cast but follows three story arcs. The first arc is about the Iron Throne of the Seven Kingdoms and follows a web of alliances and conflicts among the noble dynasties either vying to claim the throne or fighting for independence from it. The second story arc focuses on the last descendant of the realm's deposed ruling dynasty, exiled and plotting a return to the throne. The third story arc follows the longstanding brotherhood charged with defending the realm against the ancient threats of the fierce peoples and legendary creatures that lie far north and an impending winter that threatens the realm.

Game of Thrones has attracted record viewership on HBO and has a broad, active, international fan base. It has been acclaimed by critics, particularly for its acting, complex characters, story, scope and production values, although its frequent use of nudity and violence (including sexual violence) has been criticized. The series has received 47 Primetime Emmy Awards, including Outstanding Drama Series in 2015, 2016 and 2018, more than any other primetime scripted television series. Its other awards and nominations include three Hugo Awards for Best Dramatic Presentation (2012–2014), a 2011 Peabody Award and five nominations for the Golden Globe Award for Best Television Series – Drama (2012 and 2015–2018).

Of the ensemble cast, Peter Dinklage has won three Primetime Emmy Awards for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series (2011, 2015 and 2018) and the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Series, Miniseries or Television Film (2012) for his performance as Tyrion Lannister. Lena Headey, Emilia Clarke, Kit Harington, Maisie Williams, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Diana Rigg and Max von Sydow have also received Primetime Emmy Award nominations for their performances.

Game of Thrones (season 6)

The sixth season of the fantasy drama television series Game of Thrones premiered on HBO on April 24, 2016, and concluded on June 26, 2016. It consists of ten episodes, each of approximately 50–60 minutes long, largely of original content not found in George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series. Some story elements were derived from the novels and from information Martin revealed to the show-runners. The series was adapted for television by David Benioff and D. B. Weiss. HBO ordered the season on April 8, 2014, together with the fifth season, which began filming in July 2015 primarily in Northern Ireland, Spain, Croatia, Iceland and Canada. Each episode cost over $10 million.

The season follows the continuing struggle between the Starks and other noble families of Westeros for the Iron Throne. The Starks defeat the Bolton forces in battle, and Jon Snow is proclaimed the King in the North. Tyrion attempts to rule Meereen while Daenerys is held captive by a Dothraki tribe. At King's Landing, the Tyrell army attempts to liberate Margaery and Loras, but Margaery capitulates to the High Sparrow, who becomes more powerful by influencing King Tommen. At her trial, Cersei burns the Great Sept, killing her rivals, while Tommen kills himself. Cersei is crowned Queen of the Seven Kingdoms. Ellaria Sand and three of Oberyn Martell's daughters kill Doran and Trystane Martell and seize control of Dorne. In Essos, Daenerys Targaryen is captured by Khal Moro who takes her before the khals; she burns them alive and takes command of the Dothraki. Olenna and the Dornish ally with Daenerys.

Game of Thrones features a large ensemble cast, including Peter Dinklage, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Lena Headey, Emilia Clarke and Kit Harington. The season introduced new cast members, including Max von Sydow, Pilou Asbæk and Essie Davis.

Critics praised its production values, writing, plot development, and cast. Game of Thrones received most nominations for the 68th Primetime Emmy Awards, with 23 nominations, and won twelve, including that for Outstanding Drama Series for the second year in a row. U.S. viewership rose compared to the previous season, and by approximately 13% over its course, from 7.9 million to 8.9 million by the finale.

Game of Thrones (season 8)

The eighth and final season of the fantasy drama television series Game of Thrones, produced by HBO, is scheduled to premiere on April 14, 2019. Filming officially began on October 23, 2017, and concluded in July 2018.

Unlike the first six seasons that each had ten episodes and the seventh that had seven episodes, the eighth season will have only six episodes. Like the previous season, it will largely consist of original content not found in George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series, and will also adapt material Martin has revealed to showrunners about the upcoming novels in the series, The Winds of Winter and A Dream of Spring. The season was adapted for television by David Benioff and D. B. Weiss.

Gone Too Far (TV series)

Gone Too Far is a 2009 American reality television series, featuring Adam Goldstein, better known as DJ AM, intervening to help people struggling with drug addiction. MTV debuted the show on October 12, less than two months after DJ AM—an ex-addict himself—died from a drug overdose. Eight episodes were made in its single season.

Gwen Stefani

Gwen Renée Stefani (; born October 3, 1969) is an American singer-songwriter and actress. She is co-founder and lead vocalist of the band No Doubt, whose singles include "Just a Girl" and "Don't Speak" from their 1995 breakthrough studio album Tragic Kingdom, as well as "Hey Baby" and "It's My Life" from later albums.

During the band's hiatus, Stefani embarked on a solo pop career in 2004 by releasing her debut studio album Love. Angel. Music. Baby. Inspired by pop music from the 1980s, the album was a critical and commercial success. It spawned three singles: "What You Waiting For?", "Rich Girl", and "Hollaback Girl". The last reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart while also becoming the first US download to sell one million copies. In 2006, Stefani released her second studio album The Sweet Escape. The album produced the singles "Wind It Up" and "The Sweet Escape". Her third solo album, This Is What the Truth Feels Like (2016), was her first solo album to reach number one on the Billboard 200 chart.

Stefani has won three Grammy Awards. As a solo artist she has received an American Music Award, Brit Award, World Music Award and two Billboard Music Awards. In 2003, she debuted her clothing line L.A.M.B. and expanded her collection with the 2005 Harajuku Lovers line, inspired by Japanese culture and fashion. During this time Stefani performed and made public appearances with four back-up dancers known as the Harajuku Girls. She was married to British musician Gavin Rossdale from 2002 to 2016 and they have three sons. Billboard magazine ranked Stefani the 54th most successful artist and 37th most successful Hot 100 artist of the 2000–09-decade. VH1 ranked her 13th on their "100 Greatest Women in Music" list in 2012. Including her work with No Doubt, Stefani has sold more than 30 million albums worldwide.

Jack Bauer

Jack Bauer is a fictional character and the lead protagonist of the Fox television series 24. His character has worked in various capacities on the show, often as a member of the Counter Terrorist Unit (CTU) based in Los Angeles, and working with the FBI in Washington, D.C. during season 7.

Within the 24 storyline, Bauer is a key member of the CTU, its director in Season 1, and is often portrayed as their most capable agent. Bauer's job usually involves helping prevent major terrorist attacks on the United States, saving both civilian lives and government administrations. On many occasions, Jack does so at great personal expense, as those he thwarts subsequently target him and his loved ones. He is not a crooked agent; however, Bauer's frequent use of torture to gather information has generated much controversy and discussion.

Actor Kiefer Sutherland portrays Jack Bauer in the television show and video game. The television series was originally set to end on May 24, 2010 after eight successful seasons but was renewed for a ninth season, which premiered on May 5, 2014. A feature film was set to be released; however, discussions ended over a contract dispute with Fox.

TV Guide ranked him No. 49 on their list of "TV's Top 50 Heroes" and Sky 1 listed Jack as No. 1 on their list of

"TV's toughest men". Entertainment Weekly named Jack Bauer one of The 20 All Time Coolest Heroes in Pop Culture. In June 2010, Entertainment Weekly also named him one of the 100 Greatest Characters of the Last 20 Years. Jack is also the only character in the show to have appeared in all episodes.

Kylo Ren

Kylo Ren is a fictional character in the Star Wars franchise. Introduced in the 2015 film Star Wars: The Force Awakens, he is portrayed by Adam Driver. "Kylo Ren" is the chosen name of Ben Solo, the son of original Star Wars trilogy characters Han Solo and Leia Organa. Though trained by his uncle Luke Skywalker as a Jedi, he has been seduced to the dark side of the Force by Supreme Leader Snoke and aspires to be as powerful as his grandfather, Darth Vader, and create a new order in the galaxy separate from the legacies created by Luke and the Jedi Order. Kylo Ren is also the master of the Knights of Ren, as well as a commander and later the supreme leader of the First Order, an organization spawned from the fallen Galactic Empire. He is featured in The Force Awakens media and merchandising and appears in the film's sequel, Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017).

Lisa Schwarzbaum

Lisa Schwarzbaum (born 1952) is an American film critic. She joined Entertainment Weekly as a film critic in the 1990s and remained there until February 2013.

List of Marvel Cinematic Universe television series

The Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) television series are American superhero television shows based on characters that appear in publications by Marvel Comics. The shows have been in production since 2013, and in that time Marvel Television and ABC Studios, along with its production division ABC Signature Studios, have premiered 11 series across broadcast, streaming, and cable television on ABC, Netflix and Hulu, and Freeform, respectively. They have at least three more series in various stages of development, with Marvel Studios—the production studio behind the MCU films—having at least three series in development for Disney+.

The first series in the universe, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., began airing on ABC during the 2013–14 television season, and was joined by Agent Carter in the 2014–15 television season. Marvel formed a unique partnership with IMAX Corporation to premiere Inhumans in IMAX theaters in September 2017 before airing on ABC during the 2017–18 television season; a put pilot for another ABC series, Damage Control, has also been ordered, while an additional series focused on lesser-known female heroes is also in development. Netflix's Marvel series began in 2015 with Daredevil and Jessica Jones, followed by Luke Cage in 2016. Iron Fist, the crossover miniseries The Defenders, and The Punisher released in 2017. Additionally, the MCU expanded to Hulu with Runaways in 2017, and to Freeform with Cloak & Dagger in 2018. New Warriors has been ordered and is looking for a broadcaster. The first of the Marvel Studios series for Disney+ will center on Loki.

Starring in the series are Clark Gregg as Phil Coulson in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and Hayley Atwell as Peggy Carter in Agent Carter, both reprising their roles from MCU films, while Anson Mount headlines Inhumans as Black Bolt. Daredevil introduces Charlie Cox in the title role of Matt Murdock / Daredevil as well as Jon Bernthal as the Punisher in its second season, who reprises his role as the star of The Punisher. Jessica Jones introduces Krysten Ritter as Jessica Jones and Mike Colter as Luke Cage, with the latter also headlining Luke Cage. Finn Jones stars as Danny Rand / Iron Fist in Iron Fist, and joins Cox, Ritter, and Colter for The Defenders. The Runaways cast consists of the titular group, including Rhenzy Feliz as Alex Wilder, and their parents, including Ryan Sands as Geoffrey Wilder. Olivia Holt and Aubrey Joseph star in Cloak & Dagger as Tandy Bowen / Dagger and Tyrone Johnson / Cloak, respectively, while Milana Vayntrub and Derek Theler lead New Warriors as Doreen Green / Squirrel Girl and Craig Hollis / Mister Immortal, respectively. Tom Hiddleston will reprise his role as Loki for the Disney+ series.

Ned Stark

Eddard "Ned" Stark is a fictional character in the 1996 fantasy novel A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin, and Game of Thrones, HBO's adaptation of Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series. In the storyline, Ned is the lord of Winterfell, an ancient fortress in the North of the fictional continent of Westeros. Though the character is established as the main character in the novel and the first season of the TV adaptation, Martin's plot twist at the end involving Ned shocked both readers of the book and viewers of the TV series.Ned is portrayed by Sean Bean in the first season of Game of Thrones, as a child by Sebastian Croft in the sixth season, and as a young adult by Robert Aramayo in the sixth and seventh seasons. Bean was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Actor on Television and a Scream Award for Best Fantasy Actor for the role. He and the rest of the cast were nominated for Screen Actors Guild Awards for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series in 2011.

Once Upon a Time (TV series)

Once Upon a Time is an American fantasy drama television series on ABC which debuted on October 23, 2011, and concluded on May 18, 2018. The first six seasons are largely set in the fictitious seaside town of Storybrooke, Maine, with the characters of Emma Swan and Regina Mills serving as the leads, while the seventh and final season takes place in a Seattle, Washington neighborhood called Hyperion Heights, with a new main narrative led by Mills, and Swan and Mills son, Henry Mills. The show borrows elements and characters from the Disney universe and popular Western literature, folklore, and fairy tales.

Once Upon a Time was created by Lost and Tron: Legacy writers Edward Kitsis and Adam Horowitz. A spin-off series, Once Upon a Time in Wonderland, consisting of 13 episodes which followed the titular character from Alice in Wonderland, premiered on October 10, 2013 and concluded on April 3, 2014.

Owen Gleiberman

Owen Gleiberman (born February 24, 1959) is an American film critic who has been the chief film critic for Variety since May 2016. Previously, Gleiberman wrote for Entertainment Weekly from 1990 until 2014. From 1981 to 1989, he worked at The Boston Phoenix.Gleiberman was born in Switzerland, to American parents. He was raised in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and is a graduate of the University of Michigan. His family is Jewish. His work has been published in Premiere and Film Comment, and collected in the film-criticism anthology Love and Hisses. Gleiberman reviews movies for National Public Radio and for the NY1 television news channel. He is a member of the New York Film Critics Circle. He is one of the critics featured in Gerald Peary's 2009 documentary film For the Love of Movies: The Story of American Film Criticism.In a 2016 podcast interview with American Psycho author Bret Easton Ellis, Gleiberman criticized the modern abundance of comic-book film franchises, characterizing them as "cinematically dramatized Wikipedia entries" due to what he perceives as fan obsession with the "minutia" of interconnecting storylines.Gleiberman is also the author of Movie Freak, his autobiography, published by Hachette Books.

Parks and Recreation

Parks and Recreation is an American political satire television sitcom created by Greg Daniels and Michael Schur. The series aired on NBC from April 9, 2009 to February 24, 2015, for 125 episodes, over seven seasons. The series stars Amy Poehler as Leslie Knope, a perky, mid-level bureaucrat in the Parks Department of Pawnee, a fictional town in Indiana. The ensemble and supporting cast features Rashida Jones as Ann Perkins, Paul Schneider as Mark Brendanawicz, Aziz Ansari as Tom Haverford, Nick Offerman as Ron Swanson, Aubrey Plaza as April Ludgate, Chris Pratt as Andy Dwyer, Adam Scott as Ben Wyatt, Rob Lowe as Chris Traeger, Jim O'Heir as Jerry Gergich, Retta as Donna Meagle, and Billy Eichner as Craig Middlebrooks.

The writers researched local California politics for the series, and consulted with urban planners and elected officials. Poehler's character, Leslie Knope, underwent major changes after the first season, in response to audience feedback that she seemed unintelligent and "ditzy". The writing staff incorporated current events into the episodes, such as a government shutdown in Pawnee inspired by the real-life global financial crisis of 2007–2008. Several guest stars, such as Jason Mantzoukas, Kathryn Hahn, Sam Elliott, Bill Murray, Megan Mullally, Louis C.K., Paul Rudd, Henry Winkler, Christie Brinkley, and Jon Hamm, have been featured in the series, and their characters often appear in multiple episodes. In addition, real-life politicians have cameos in later episodes such as former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, US Senators Olympia Snowe, Barbara Boxer, Cory Booker, Orrin Hatch, and John McCain, then-Vice President Joe Biden, and then-First Lady Michelle Obama.

Parks and Recreation was part of NBC's "Comedy Night Done Right" programming during its Thursday night prime-time block. The series received mixed reviews during its first season, but, after a re-approach to its tone and format, the second and subsequent seasons were widely acclaimed. Throughout its run, Parks and Recreation received several awards and nominations, fourteen Primetime Emmy Award nominations, including two for Outstanding Comedy Series, a Golden Globe Award win for Poehler's performance, and a nomination for the Golden Globe Award for Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy. In TIME's 2012 year-end lists issue, Parks and Recreation was named the number one television series of that year. In 2013, after receiving four consecutive nominations in the category, Parks and Recreation won the Television Critics Association Award for Outstanding Achievement in Comedy.

Tina Fey

Elizabeth Stamatina "Tina" Fey (; born May 18, 1970) is an American actress, comedian, writer, producer, and playwright. She is best known for her work on the NBC sketch comedy series Saturday Night Live (1997–2006) and for creating the acclaimed comedy series 30 Rock (2006–2013) and Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt (2015–2019). Fey is also known for her work in film, with starring roles in Baby Mama (2008), Date Night (2010), Megamind (2010), Muppets Most Wanted (2014), Sisters (2015), and Whiskey Tango Foxtrot (2016).

Fey broke into comedy as a featured player in the Chicago-based improvisational comedy group The Second City. She then joined SNL as a writer, later becoming head writer and a performer, known for her position as co-anchor in the Weekend Update segment and, later, for her satirical portrayal of 2008 Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin in subsequent guest appearances. In 2004, she co-starred in and wrote the screenplay for Mean Girls, which was adapted from the 2002 self-help book Queen Bees and Wannabes. After leaving SNL in 2006, Fey created the television series 30 Rock for Broadway Video, a sitcom loosely based on her experiences at SNL. In the series, Fey starred as Liz Lemon, the head writer of a fictional sketch comedy series. In 2011, she released her memoir, Bossypants, which topped The New York Times Best Seller list for five weeks and garnered her a Grammy Award nomination. In 2015, she co-created the Netflix comedy series Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt. Fey created the musical adaptation Mean Girls, which premiered on Broadway in 2018, and earned her a Tony Award nomination.

Fey has received nine Primetime Emmy Awards, three Golden Globe Awards, five Screen Actors Guild Awards, and seven Writers Guild of America Awards. In 2008, the Associated Press gave Fey the AP Entertainer of the Year award for her Sarah Palin impression on SNL. In 2010, Fey was awarded the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor, becoming the youngest-ever recipient of the award.

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