Enoch Bolles

Enoch Bolles (3 March 1883 – 16 March 1976) was an American painter of pin-up art. He was among the earliest and most widely circulated glamour illustrators. While known today solely as a pinup artist, Bolles was a versatile illustrator who also worked extensively in the advertising industry, creating hundreds of attractive color illustrations for products ranging from bread to cigarettes. His most widely reproduced advertising illustration is the "Windy Girl" for Zippo lighters. This work, produced in 1937, has recently been reissued as the Vargas Windy Girl and has appeared in well over 100 variations on Zippo lighters.

Biography

Bolles was born in Boardman, Marion County, Florida, the son of Enoch Bolles, Jr., a chemist in the perfume industry, and Catherine Keep. After his father's death, the family moved to Newark, New Jersey, where he met and, in 1903, married Clara Kaufman. They had eight children together, eventually settling in Harrington, New Jersey.[1]

Bolles studied at the National Academy of Design, and his first illustrations were published in 1914 on the covers of joke books, such as Judge and Puck. He became best known for illustrating Film Fun. In 1923 he became the exclusive cover artist for Film Fun and continued in this role until the magazine folded in 1943, a victim of the Postmaster General's campaign against 'salacious' material. In addition to his 200 covers for Film Fun, Bolles painted at least 300 more for spicy pulps, including Breezy Stories, Pep and New York Nights. None of this work was signed and most of it remains unattributed. Bolles' monthly lineup of all-American beauties precisely posed in wildly imaginative costumes did much to define the future of American pin-up illustration, and remain popular today. He was also a versatile illustrator who created advertising for many products, including Sun-Maid Raisins and Zippo lighters.

Psychological problems ended Bolles professional career in 1943 and confined him to Greystone Hospital in New Jersey for most of the rest of his life, but he continued to paint commissioned portraits and for personal pleasure. He was eventually discharged from hospital in 1969, and died from heart failure at the age of 93.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b Enoch Bolles at Pulpartists.com
  • The Great American Pin-Up, by Charles G. Martignette and Louis K. Meisel, ISBN 3-8228-1701-5
  • Beauty by Design: The Art of Enoch Bolles, by Jack Raglin, Illustration Magazine (#9), 2004
  • The Art Stars of Film Fun, by Jack Raglin, Illustration Magazine (# 14), 2005.

External links

Earle K. Bergey

Earle Kulp Bergey (August 26, 1901 – September 30, 1952) was an American artist and illustrator who painted cover art for thousands of pulp fiction magazines and paperback books. One of the most prolific pulp fiction artists of the 20th century, Bergey is recognized for creating the iconic cover of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes for Popular Library at the height of his career in 1948.

Bergey was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to A. Frank and Ella Kulp Bergey. He attended Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts from 1921 to 1926, finishing formal Academy studies in the spring of 1926. He initially went to work in the art departments of Philadelphia newspapers including Public Ledger, and he drew the comic strip Deb Days in 1927. Early in his career, Bergey contributed many covers to the pulp magazines of publisher Fiction House. By the mid-1930s, Bergey made a home and studio in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and he married in 1935.

Francis Wilford-Smith

Francis Wilford-Smith (12 March 1927 – 4 December 2009) was a British cartoonist, graphic artist, and producer and archivist of blues music. As a cartoonist, he used the pseudonym Smilby, a contraction of his surname with his wife's maiden name.

George Quaintance

George Quaintance (June 3, 1902 – November 8, 1957) was an American artist, famous for his "idealized, strongly homoerotic" depictions of men in mid-20th-century physique magazines. Using historical settings to justify the nudity or distance the subjects from modern society, his art featured idealized muscular, semi-nude or nude male figures; Wild West settings were a common motif. His artwork helped establish the stereotype of the "macho stud" who was also homosexual, leading him to be called a "pioneer of a gay aesthetic". He was an influence on many later homoerotic artists, such as Tom of Finland.

List of illustrators

This is an alphabetical list of notable illustrators.

List of pin-up artists

This is a list of artists who work primarily in the medium of the pin-up.

Maurice Milliere

Maurice Milliere (1871–1946) was a French painter, printmaker and illustrator, born in Le Havre to upper working class parents; his father was a merchant's clerk. His early artistic interests are not known, but he completed his secondary education at the Ecole De Beaux Arts in Le Havre before travelling to Paris in 1889 to continue his studies at the l'Ecole des Arts Decoratifs and l'Ecole des Beaux-Arts.

He was a contemporary of Louis Icart, although some his early etchings (from c1907) predate those of Icart. Milliere served as an early inspiration to Alberto Vargas and Enoch Bolles and was undeniably a commercial success. In addition to his original works of art such as the oil paintings and etchings, he was a prolific commercial illustrator, being commissioned to create images that were used in magazines such as La Vie Parisienne, Le Sourire — reprinted in US during the 1920s — and Fantasio, on postcards, posters, menus and product packaging.

He also gained much critical success, exhibiting at "Salon des Artistes Francais", "Salon des Humoristes" being made a Chevalier de la Légion d'honneur and at the 1931 L'Exposition Coloniale where he was awarded a gold medal.

He helped to establish the genre of boudoir art. Millière died in 1946 at the age of 74.

Pin-up model

A pin-up model (known as a pin-up girl for a female and less commonly male pin-up for a male) is a model whose mass-produced pictures see wide appeal as popular culture. Pin-ups are intended for informal display, i.e. meant to be "pinned-up" on a wall. Pin-up models may be glamour models, fashion models, or actors. These pictures are also sometimes known as cheesecake photos. Cheesecake was an American slang word, that was considered a publicly acceptable term for seminude women because pin-up was considered taboo in the early twentieth century.The term pin-up may refer to drawings, paintings, and other illustrations as well as photographs (see the list of pin-up artists). The term was first attested to in English in 1941; however, the practice is documented back at least to the 1890s. Pin-up images could be cut out of magazines or newspapers, or on a postcard or lithograph. Such pictures often appear on walls, desks, or calendars. Posters of pin-ups were mass-produced, and became popular from the mid-20th century.

Male pin-ups were less common than their female counterparts throughout the 20th century, although a market for homoerotica has always existed as well as pictures of popular male celebrities targeted at women or girls. Examples include James Dean and Jim Morrison.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.