Enlisted rank

An enlisted rank (also known as an enlisted grade or enlisted rate) is, in some armed services, any rank below that of a commissioned officer. The term can be inclusive of non-commissioned officers or warrant officers, except in United States military usage where warrant officers/chief warrant officers are a separate officer category ranking above enlisted grades and below commissioned officer grades. In most cases, enlisted service personnel perform jobs specific to their own occupational specialty, as opposed to the more generalized command responsibilities of commissioned officers.[1] The term "enlistment" refers solely to a military commitment (whether officer or enlisted) whereas the terms "taken of strength" and "struck off strength" refer to a servicemember being carried on a given unit's roll.[2]

Navies Armies Air forces
Commissioned officers
Admiral of
the fleet
Field marshal or
General of the Army
Marshal of
the air force
Admiral General Air chief marshal
Vice admiral Lieutenant general Air marshal
Rear admiral Major general Air vice-marshal
Commodore Brigadier or
brigadier general
Air commodore
Captain Colonel Group captain
Commander Lieutenant colonel Wing commander
Lieutenant
commander
Major or
Commandant
Squadron leader
Lieutenant Captain Flight lieutenant
Lieutenant
junior grade
or
sub-lieutenant
Lieutenant or
first lieutenant
Flying officer
Ensign or
midshipman
Second lieutenant Pilot officer
Officer cadet Officer cadet Flight cadet
Enlisted grades
Warrant officer or
chief petty officer
Warrant officer or
sergeant major
Warrant officer
Petty officer Sergeant Sergeant
Leading seaman Corporal or
bombardier
Corporal
Seaman Private or
gunner or
trooper
Aircraftman or
airman
Talk·View

Canadian Forces

In the Canadian Forces, the term non-commissioned member (NCM) is used.[3]

North Atlantic Treaty Organization

For the ranks used by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, non-commissioned ranks are coded OR1–OR9 (bottom to top), OR being an abbreviation for Other Ranks.[4][5]

United States Armed Forces

The five branches of the U.S. Armed Forces all use the same "E-" designation for enlisted pay grades, with service-specific names applied to each (e.g., chief petty officer, master gunnery sergeant, private first class).[6] Each branch incorporates it as part of a service member's job specialty designator. In the United States Air Force, this job specialty designator is known as an Air Force Specialty Code, in the United States Army and United States Marine Corps, a Military Occupational Specialty, and in the United States Navy and United States Coast Guard, a rating.

See also

References

  1. ^ Cunneen, Chris. "Biography - Ernest Durack". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Retrieved 2014-02-12.
    Veterans-UK web team. "Veterans Welfare Service". Veterans-uk.info. Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 2014-02-12.
    "Applicant For Enlistment English And French - War Service Badges - Canadian Military Medals And Decorations - Records & Collections - Veterans Affairs Canada". Veterans.gc.ca. Retrieved 2014-02-12.
    Walker, James W. St. G. (1989). "Race and Recruitment in World War I:Enlistment of Visible Minorities in the Canadian Expeditionary Force" (PDF). Canadian Historical Review. 70 (1). Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 October 2013.
    "Avoiding the War". Canadian Broadcast Corporation. 2001. Retrieved 2014-02-12.
    Canada and the First World War: Essays in Honour of Robert Craig Brown. University of Toronto Press. 2005. p. 115. ISBN 0802084451. Retrieved 2014-02-12.
    Vance, Jonathan F. (2012-04-26). "Provincial Patterns of Enlistment in the Canadian Expeditionary Force". Canadian Military History. 17 (2). Retrieved 2014-02-12.
  2. ^ "Glossary | Australian War Memorial". Awm.gov.au. Archived from the original on 21 February 2014. Retrieved 2014-02-12.
    "Lest We Forget: First World War Cenotaph Research" (PDF). Library and Archives Canada. Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 2014-02-12.
    "The Leadership of S.V. Radley-Walters: Enlistment to D-Day Part One". Journal.forces.gc.ca. Retrieved 2014-02-12.
    Cox, Kenneth G. (2011). Call to the Colours, A: Tracing Your Canadian Military Ancestors. Ontario Genealogical Society. p. 161. ISBN 9781554888641. Retrieved 2014-02-12.
    Wilson, David A. (2009). Irish Nationalism in Canada. McGill-Queen's University Press. p. 103. ISBN 9780773536357. Retrieved 2014-02-12.
  3. ^ "Queen's Regulations and Orders (QR&Os) - Volume I Chapter 1: Introduction and Definitions". Admfincs.forces.gc.ca. 2013-10-18. Retrieved 2014-02-08.
  4. ^ NATO glossary of abbreviations used in NATO documents and publications / Glossaire OTAN des abréviations utilisées dans les documents et publications OTAN (PDF). 2010. p. 238.
  5. ^ "NATO NATO Rank Codes and UK Service Ranks". Royal Air Force (doc).
  6. ^ "U.S. military enlisted ranks". www.defense.gov. United States Department of Defense. Retrieved 4 July 2013.
Airman

An Airman is a member of an air force or air arm of a nation's armed forces. In certain air forces, it can also refer to a specific enlisted rank.In civilian aviation usage, the term airman is analogous to the term sailor in nautical usage. In the American Federal Aviation Administration usage, an airman is any holder of an airman's certificate, male or female. This certificate is issued to those who qualify for it by the Federal Aviation Administration Airmen Certification Branch.

Airman Basic

Airman Basic (AB) is the lowest enlisted rank in the United States Air Force (USAF), immediately below Airman. The pay grade for airman basic is E-1.As opposed to all other USAF enlisted and officer ranks, Airman Basic has no rank insignia affiliated. The lack of uniform insignia for Airmen Basic is the reason for the nickname "slick-sleeve"; all other enlisted Air Force ranks wear stripes and chevrons on their uniform sleeves.In accordance with Air Force Instruction (AFI) 36-2618, The Enlisted Force Structure, the term of address for an airman basic is "Airman Basic" or "Airman".

Airman first class

Airman First Class (A1C) is the third enlisted rank (E-3) in the United States Air Force, just above Airman and below Senior Airman. The rank of Airman First Class is considered a junior enlisted rank, with the non-commissioned officers and senior non-commissioned officers above it.

Airman First Class is a rank that has also been used by the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Coast Guard, although it is not currently in use. In documents about the history of U.S. armed forces, this rank is abbreviated as "A1C".

Australian Army enlisted rank insignia

Like the British Army, the Australian Army does not use the term 'enlisted' to describe its non-commissioned ranks. Instead, personnel who are not commissioned officers are referred to as other ranks. These are soldiers, non-commissioned officers (NCOs) and warrant officers (WOs). Warrant officers are appointed by a warrant which is signed by the Chief of the Army. The insignia for non-commissioned ranks are identical to the British Army up to the rank of warrant officer class two. Since 1976, WO1s and the WO in the Australian Army wear insignia using the Australian Coat of Arms.

British Army other ranks rank insignia

The term used to refer to all ranks below officers is "other ranks" (abbreviated "ORs"). It includes warrant officers, non-commissioned officers ("NCOs") and ordinary soldiers with the rank of private or regimental equivalent. Officers may, in speaking, distinguish themselves from those "in the ranks".

Irish Army

The Irish Army, known simply as the Army (Irish: an tArm), is the land component of the Defence Forces of Ireland. As of May 2016, approximately 7,300 men and women serve in the Irish Army on a permanent basis and 1,600 active Reservists, divided into two geographically organised brigades. As well as maintaining its primary roles of defending the State and internal security within the State, since 1958 the Army has had a continuous presence in peacekeeping missions around the world. The Army also participates in the European Union Battlegroups. The Air Corps and Naval Service support the Army in carrying out its roles.

Irish Naval Service

The Naval Service (Irish: an tSeirbhís Chabhlaigh) is the maritime component of the Defence Forces of Ireland and is one of the three branches of the Irish Defence Forces. Its base is in Haulbowline, County Cork.

Though preceded by earlier maritime defence organisations, the Naval Service was formed in 1946. Since the 1970s a major role of the Naval Service has been the provision of fisheries protection in Ireland's exclusive economic zone (EEZ). Other roles include sea patrol, surveillance, and smuggling prevention. Occasionally the Service undertakes longer missions in support of other elements of the Defence Forces, Irish peacekeepers serving with the United Nations, or humanitarian and trade missions.From July 2017 the Naval Service is a participating in the European External Action Service mission which focuses a number of EU Navies on humanitarian and training roles in the Mediterranean. This mission entitled EU Navfor Med is the first time Ireland has taken part in a multi-role and multi-national naval operation.

Ships in the Irish Naval Service are designated Long Éireannach, which is abbreviated to LÉ. The LÉ Eithne is the current flagship of the Naval Service.

List of United States Navy enlisted rates

In the United States Navy, a rate is the military rank of an enlisted sailor, indicating where an enlisted sailor stands within the chain of command, and also defining one's pay grade. However, in the U.S. Navy, only officers carry the term rank, while it is proper to refer to an enlisted sailor's pay grade as rate. A similar term is rating, which refers to one's area of occupational specialization within the enlisted Navy. Associated with the enlisted pay grades is a numbering system from the most junior enlisted sailor ("E-1") to the most senior enlisted sailor ("E-9"). This enlisted numbering system is the same across all five branches of the U.S. military. All E-1 through E-3 are known as Seamen. E-4 through E-6 are called petty officers. All E-7s are called chief petty officer, E-8s senior chief petty officer, and E-9s master chief petty officer. Rates are displayed on a rating badge, which is a combination of rate and rating. E-2s and E-3s have color-coded group rate marks based on their career field. Personnel in pay grade E-1, since 1996, do not have an insignia to wear.Ratings are earned through "A" schools, which are attended before deployment and after undergoing initial basic training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Illinois, or (less commonly) by "striking" for a rating through on-the-job training (OJT) in the Fleet. Some sailors may undergo additional training in a "C" school either before or after a tour of duty. Upon completion, they are assigned a four-digit Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) code, which identifies a specific skill within their standard rating. This defines what jobs they are qualified to do. For example, some billets might not only require a hospital corpsman first class, but might specify that he/she has NEC 8402 (Submarine Force Independent Duty), NEC 8403 (Fleet Marine Forces Reconnaissance Independent Duty Corpsman), or any other of several NECs depending upon the billet's requirements.

Master sergeant

A master sergeant is the military rank for a senior non-commissioned officer in the armed forces of some countries.

RAF other ranks

The term used in the Royal Air Force (RAF) to refer to all ranks below commissioned officer level is other ranks (ORs). It includes warrant officers (WOs), non-commissioned officers (NCOs) and airmen.

Rank insignia of the German Bundeswehr

The rank insignia of the armed forces of the Federal Republic of Germany indicate rank and branch of service in the German Army (Heer), German Air Force (Luftwaffe), or the German Navy (Marine).

They are regulated by the "presidential order on rank designation and military uniform".

The 'ZDv-37/10 – Anzugsordnung für Soldaten der Bundeswehr' (ZDv: Zentrale Dienstvorschrift - Central Service Provision) gives the dress order and design variations. Further, the Federal Office of Equipment, IT, and In-Service Support of the Bundeswehr (Bundesamt für Ausrüstung, Informationstechnik und Nutzung der Bundeswehr) provides numerous details.

Royal Navy ratings rank insignia

This is a list of British Royal Navy ratings rank insignia.

Saudi Arabian military ranks

The article contains the military ranks and insignias of the Armed Forces of Saudi Arabia. The insignias were influenced by both the British and the American militaries.

Sergeant first class

Sergeant First Class (SFC) is a military rank in some militaries and other uniformed organizations around the world, typically that of a senior non-commissioned officer.

United States Air Force enlisted rank insignia

The chart below represents the current enlisted rank insignia of the United States Air Force.

While all Air Force military personnel are referred to as Airmen, it can specifically refer to the pay grades of E-1 through E-4 which are below the level of non-commissioned officers (NCOs). Above the pay grade of E-4 (E-5 through E-9) all ranks fall into the category of NCO and are further subdivided into NCOs (E-5 & E-6) and Senior NCOs (E-7 through E-9); the term Junior NCO is sometimes used to refer to staff sergeants and technical sergeants (E-5 and E-6).The Air Force is the only one of the five branches of the United States military where NCO status is now only achieved at the grade of E-5. Formerly, the grade of Sergeant was obtained after a time as a Senior Airman and successful completion of the Air Force NCO School. In all other branches, NCO status can be achieved at the grade of E-4 (a Corporal in the Army and Marine Corps, Petty Officer Third Class in the Navy and Coast Guard). However, E-4s in the Army with the rank of Specialist are not NCOs. The Air Force mirrored the Army from 1976 to 2 May 1991 with an E-4 being either a Senior Airman wearing three stripes without a star or a Sergeant (informally referred to as "Buck Sergeant") which was noted by the presence of the central star and considered an NCO. Despite not being an NCO, a Senior Airman who has completed Airman Leadership School can be a supervisor.

United States Army enlisted rank insignia

The chart below shows the current enlisted rank insignia of the United States Army, with seniority, and pay grade, increasing from left to right. Enlisted ranks of corporal and higher are considered non-commissioned officers (NCOs). The rank of specialist is a soldier of pay grade E-4 who has not yet attained non-commissioned officer status. It is common that a soldier may never be a corporal and will move directly from specialist to sergeant, attaining NCO status at that time.

In the beginning, US army enlisted rank was indicated by colored epaulettes. The use of chevrons came into being in 1821, with the orientation changing from point-down to point-up and back again, to the point-down orientation seen on Civil War soldiers. Around the turn of the 20th century, point-up wear was ordained and has remained so.

United States Army enlisted rank insignia of World War I

The United States Army's enlisted rank insignia that was used during World War I differs from the current system. The color scheme used for the insignia's chevron was olive drab for field use uniforms or one of several colors (depending on the corps) on dress uniforms. The chevron system used by enlisted men during World War I came into being in 1895, and was changed to a different system in 1919. Specification 760, which was dated May 31, 1905 contained 45 different enlisted insignia that varied designs and titles by different corps of the army. General Order Number 169, which was enacted on August 14, 1907, created an even larger variety of enlisted rank insignia. Pay grades were not yet in use by the U.S. Army. The pay system identified the job assignment of the soldier. By the end of World War I, the system contained 128 different insignia designs.

United States Army enlisted rank insignia of World War II

The U.S. Army enlisted rank insignia that was used during World War II differs from the current system. The color scheme used for the insignia's chevron design was defined as either silvery-grey on dark blue, olive drab on dark blue, or khaki on dark blue (as seen in the charts below). This scheme of rank insignia was established by War Department Circular No. 303 on 5 August 1920 and would see two significant changes in 1942. The usage of this style of insignia was ended by Department of the Army Circular No. 202, dated 7 July 1948, which provided for significant changes in both rank and insignia design.

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