English Short Title Catalogue

The English Short Title Catalogue (ESTC) is a union short-title catalogue of works published between 1473 and 1800, in Britain and its former colonies, notably those in North America, and primarily in English, drawing on the collections of the British Library and other libraries in Britain and around the world.[1] It is co-managed by the British Library and the Center for Bibliographical Studies and Research (CBSR) at the University of California, Riverside. The database is freely searchable.

ESTC-Title-count-1600-1800
ESTC title count 1600–1799. The ups and downs in phases of political turmoil are clearly visible, particularly the sharp rise of the title output following the abolition of the Star chamber in 1641.
1477-1799 ESTC titles per decade, statistics
The series 1477–1799 with numbers per decade

History

The ESTC began life as the Eighteenth-Century Short Title Catalogue, with the same abbreviation, covering only 1701 to 1800. Earlier printed works had been catalogued in A. W. Pollard and G. R. Redgrave's Short Title Catalogue (1st edn 1926; 2nd edn, 1976–91) for the period 1473 to 1640; and Donald Goddard Wing's similarly titled bibliography (1945–51, with later supplements and addenda) for the period 1641 to 1700. These works were eventually incorporated into the database.

See also

References

  1. ^ "English Short-Title Catalog (1473-1800) North America". University of California. Retrieved 2007-03-22.

Bibliography

  • Snyder, Henry L. and Michael S. Smith (eds.) The English Short-Title Catalogue: past, present, future. New York: AMS, 2003.

External links

Media related to English Short Title Catalogue at Wikimedia Commons

Books in the United Kingdom

As of 2018, seven firms in the United Kingdom rank among the world's biggest publishers of books in terms of revenue: Bloomsbury, Cambridge University Press, Informa, Oxford University Press, Pearson, Quarto, and RELX Group.

Coridon and Parthenia

Coridon and Parthenia or "Coridon and Parthenia, The Languishing Shepherd made Happy. Or, Faithful Love rewarded" is a Broadside Ballad, which dates from, by estimation of the English Short Title Catalogue, the last three decades of the seventeenth century. The ballad begins, "When busie Fame ore all the Plain,/ Parthenias Praises rung." Copies of the ballad can be found at the National Library of Scotland, the British Library, and the University of Glasgow Library. Alternatively, online facsimiles of the ballad are available for public consumption.

ESTC

ESTC may refer to:

English Short Title Catalogue

Lisbon Theatre and Film School (ESTC - Escola Superior de Teatro e Cinema)

Edmond Hoyle

Edmond Hoyle (1672 – 29 August 1769) was a writer best known for his works on the rules and play of card games. The phrase "according to Hoyle" came into the language as a reflection of his generally perceived authority on the subject; since that time, use of the phrase has expanded into general use in situations in which a speaker wishes to indicate an appeal to a putative authority.

Henry Snyder

Henry L. Snyder (November 3, 1929 – February 29, 2016) was professor emeritus of history at the University of California, Riverside, and the former director of the Center for Bibliographical Studies and Research. He served as a co-director and the leader of the American English Short Title Catalogue team for more than 32 years.Dr. Snyder was a senior scholar in the fields of British history, specializing in the early 18th century, and bibliography. He is the author of more than 30 scholarly articles, co-author of a text on English history, The English Heritage (several editions) and Cataloging of the Hand Press: A Comparative and Analytical Study Of Cataloging Rules and Formats Employed in Europe (1994); co-editor of The Scottish World (1981) and The English Short-Title Catalogue: Past, Present, Future (2003); and the editor of The Marlborough-Godolphin Correspondence, published by the Clarendon Press in three volumes in 1975.

He was born November 3, 1929, in Hayward, California. He earned the B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. degrees at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Snyder served at the University of Kansas (KU) from 1963 to 1979 rising to the rank of professor, at Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge (LSU) from 1979 to 1986 and from 1986 at the University of California, Riverside, (UCR) where he served as director of the Center for Bibliographical Studies and Research until his retirement at the end of 2009. He served as Dean of Research Administration at KU, Dean of the College of Letters and Sciences at LSU, and Dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at UCR. He was a visiting Lecturer at Bedford College, University of London, 1965–66, and a Fulbright Lecturer at the University of Hamburg in 1974. From 1978 through 2009 Dr. Snyder served as co-director of the English Short Title Catalogue in partnership with the British Library. From 1990 through 2009 he served as director of the California Newspaper Project, which metamorphosed into the California Digital Newspaper Collection. In 2000 he inaugurated CCILA, Catálogo colectivo de impresos latinoamericanos hasta 1851. He developed the prototype for the Hand Press Book File of the Consortium of European Research Libraries (CERL) and was one of the organizers of CERL.

Snyder was a past president of the American Society for Eighteenth Century Studies and served upon the boards of directors of several scholarly organizations. He was a member of IFLA, the International of Federation of Librarian Associations, from 1988 to 2009, serving on the Rare Books and Manuscripts Section, for which he was chair for four years, and the Newspaper Section. He was a member of the board of directors of the Book Club of California from 2009 to 2014 and served as Librarian. He served on the board of directors of the California Genealogical Society, is chair of its Library Committee and Librarian. From 1951 to 1961 he served as an officer in the California Army National Guard, commanding companies in Walnut Creek and Pittsburg. In the latter year he transferred to the Army Reserve, serving until 1978, when he retired as a lieutenant colonel. For more than a decade he served on the consulting faculty and taught at the U S Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He was awarded a Fulbright research fellowship to Germany and senior fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies and the National Endowment for the Humanities (declined). He was the founding president of the Baton Rouge Opera and also served as the President of the Riverside [Calif.] Opera.

He received one of the 2007 National Humanities Medals His award cited him "for visionary leadership in bridging the worlds of scholarship and technology. His direction of massive projects in the digital humanities has opened new frontiers in cataloguing and preserving ideas and documents for future generations."At the end of 2009 Queen Elizabeth II was pleased to graciously approve Dr. Snyder's appointment as an honorary officer (O.B.E.) of The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire for "services to English Studies worldwide". [1] In May 2010 he was named Emeritus Professor of the year at the University of California, Riverside. He died on February 29, 2016, in Kensington, California.

John Sherry

John Sherry (c. 1506 – 1555), was the Anglican Archdeacon of Lewes in East Sussex, England, between 1542 and 1551.

Kentish Dick

Kentish Dick is an English Broadside ballad that dates back, from estimation by the English Short Title Catalogue, to the 1670s. The full title is: "Kentish Dick; Or, The Lusty Coach-Man of Westminster. With an Account how he Tickled the Young Lasses and Caused their Sad Lamentation." It is most recognized by the tune to which it is set, "Let Mary Live Long." The ballad's opening lines are, "In Westminster Town/ you there may discover/ a wavering lover." Extant copies of the ballad can be found at the University of Glasgow Library, the British Library and the National Library of Scotland.

King Edward the Fourth and a Tanner of Tamworth

King Edward the Fourth and a Tanner of Tamworth is a ballad first found in the Child Ballad collection, number 273. A ballad of this title was licensed in 1564. Versions of this ballad also exist outside the Child collection. Additional copies can be found at the British Library, the University of Glasgow Library, and the Pepys Library at Magdalene College. These ballads dates, by estimation of the English Short Title Catalogue, range from the early seventeenth century to as late as 1775. The ballad is most recognized by its opening line: "In summer time, when leaves grow green." Child describes the appeal of this ballad to be centered on the chance meeting with a King, which is also a recurring theme in tales of Robin Hood.

Lady Isabel's Tragedy

Lady Isabel's Tragedy, or "The Lady Isabella's Tragedy; or, The Step-Mother's Cruelty" is a Broadside Ballad, which dates from, by estimation of the English Short Title Catalogue, as early as 1672 and as late as 1779—suggesting its popularity and positive reception. The ballad begins, "There was a Lord of worthy Fame." Copies of the ballad can be found at the National Library of Scotland, the British Library, University of Glasgow Library, the Huntington Library, and the Pepys Library at Magdalene College. Alternatively, online facsimiles of the ballad are available for public consumption at sites like the English Broadside Ballad Archive. The ballad has notable connections to the stories of Snow White, the myth of Philomela, and Titus Andronicus.

List of online databases

This is a list of online databases accessible via the Internet.

Love in a Maze (ballad)

Love in a Maze is an English broadside ballad that dates back, from estimation by the English Short Title Catalogue, to the 1640s, which immediately coincides with the publication of James Shirley's play, The Changes, or Love in a Maze, in 1639. The full title of the ballad is: "Love in a MAZE: / OR, The Young-man put to his Dumps. / Here in this Song you may behold and see / A gallant Girl obtain'd by Wit and Honesty; / All you that hear my Song, and mark it but aright, / Will say true love's worth gold, and breeds delight." It is set to the tune of, "The True Lovers Delight; Or, The Cambridge Horn." The ballad's opening lines are, "LAte in the Morning as I abroad was walking,/All in a meadow green, I heard two Lovers talking;." Extant copies of the ballad can be found at the Glasgow University Library, the British Library, the Huntington Library, the Pepys Library at Magdalene College, and the National Library of Scotland.

Monthly Magazine

The Monthly Magazine (1796–1843) of London began publication in February 1796

Post-Reformation Digital Library

The Post-Reformation Digital Library (PRDL) is a database of digitized books from the early modern era. The collected titles are directly linked to full-text versions of the works in question. The bibliography was initially inclined toward Protestant writers from the Reformation and immediate Post-Reformation era (the later sometimes characterized as the age of Protestant Scholasticism). In its current development the project is moving toward being a comprehensive database of early modern theology and philosophy and also includes late medieval and patristic works printed in the early modern period.

The database is a project of the Junius Institute for Digital Reformation Research at Calvin Theological Seminary, and was produced in cooperation with the H. Henry Meeter Center for Calvin Studies, a joint undertaking of Calvin College and Calvin Theological Seminary.

As bibliographical projects such as VD 16, VD 17, and English Short Title Catalogue, have a more narrow national or regional focus, meta-bibliographical tools such as PRDL and Early Modern Thought Online play a vital role in facilitating scholarship in the rapidly changing technological landscape.

Robert Andrews (translator)

Robert Andrews (1723–1766) was an English Dissenter, known as a poet and translator of Virgil.

The Lamentation of Cloris

The Lamentation of Cloris or "The Lamentation of Cloris, For the Unkindness of her Shepherd" is a Broadside Ballad, which dates from, by estimation of the English Short Title Catalogue,1678-1680. The ballad begins, "MY Shepherd's unkind,/ alas, what shall I do?." Copies of the ballad can be found at the National Library of Scotland, the British Library, the Pepys Library at Magdalene College, and the University of Glasgow Library. Alternatively, online facsimiles of the ballad are available for public consumption. The nucleus of the ballad centers around a cuckolding and the justification for marital infidelity.

The Old Man's Complaint Against His Wretched Son, Who to Advance His Marriage Did Undo Himself

"A Ballad Intituled, The Old Mans Complaint against his / Wretched Son, who to Advance his Marriage, did undo himself" is a broadside ballad about an aged father’s plaintive account of the suffering he endured under his son and daughter-in-law. The publication date for this ballad is not definitive. The English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA) at the Department of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara lists the dates from 1686-1693, while the English Short Title Catalogue (ESTC) records the date at 1695. An extant copy of this ballad can be found in the British Library's Collection of Roxburghe Ballads. This ballad is recognized by its opening lines, "ALL you that fathers be, / look on my misery".

The Secrets of Angling

The Secrets of Angling was a book written by John Dennys. It was the earliest English poetical treatise on fishing, first published in 1613 in London. A didactic pastoral poem in 3 books, in the style of Virgil's Georgics. It was published in 4 editions until 1652, examples of which are amongst the rarest books in existence.

Dennys's poem was published anonymously, 4 years posthumously, and for 198 years the poem was misattributed, its authorship remaining a mystery until 1811.

VD 16

The Verzeichnis der im deutschen Sprachbereich erschienenen Drucke des 16. Jahrhunderts (VD 16) (in English: Bibliography of Books Printed in the German Speaking Countries of the Sixteenth Century), abbreviated VD 16, is a project to make a retrospective German national bibliography for the sixteenth century. The project was compiled during the period 1969–1999. It is financed by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation).

There is a corresponding German national bibliography for the seventeenth century, known as VD 17. Together the VD 16 and VD 17 alongside the planned VD 18 (Verzeichnis der im deutschen Sprachraum erschienenen Drucke des 18. Jahrhunderts) fulfill a function for the bibliographic history of the German cultural zone similar to the English Short Title Catalogue for Britain and North America.

William Freind

William Freind (c.1715–1766) was an 18th-century Church of England clergyman who was Dean of Canterbury from 1760 to 1766.

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