England women's national football team

The England women's national football team has been governed by the Football Association (FA) since 1993, having been previously administered by the Women's Football Association (WFA). England played its first international match in November 1972 against Scotland. Although most national football teams represent a sovereign state, as a member of the United Kingdom's Home Nations, England is permitted by FIFA statutes to maintain its own national side that competes in all major tournaments, with the exception of the Women's Olympic Football Tournament.

England have qualified for the FIFA Women's World Cup five times, reaching the quarter-finals on three occasions; in 1995, 2007, and 2011, finishing third in 2015 and fourth in 2019. They reached the final of the UEFA Women's Championship in 1984 and 2009.

England
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Three Lionesses
The Lionesses
AssociationThe Football Association
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachPhil Neville
CaptainSteph Houghton
Most capsFara Williams (170)
Top scorerKelly Smith (46)
FIFA codeENG
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 5 Decrease 2 (12 July 2019)[1]
Highest2 (March 2018)
Lowest14 (June 2004)
First international
 Scotland 2–3 England 
(Greenock, Scotland; 18 November 1972)
Biggest win
 Hungary 0–13 England 
(Tapolca, Hungary; 27 October 2005)
Biggest defeat
 Norway 8–0 England 
(Moss, Norway; 4 June 2000)
World Cup
Appearances5 (first in 1995)
Best resultThird place (2015)
European Championship
Appearances8 (first in 1984)
Best resultRunners-up (1984, 2009)

History

Early years

The success of the men's national football team at the 1966 FIFA World Cup led to an upsurge of interest in football from women within England. The Women's Football Association (WFA) was established in 1969 as an attempt to organise the women's game.[2] That same year, Harry Batt formed an independent English team that competed in the Fédération Internationale Européenne de Football Féminine (FIEFF) European Cup.[3]:43 Batt's team also participated in two FIEFF World Cups held in Italy (1970) and Mexico (1971).[4][5]

Following an UEFA recommendation in 1972 for national associations to incorporate the women's game, the Football Association (FA) rescinded its 50-year ban on women playing on English Football League grounds.[6][7] Shortly after, Eric Worthington was tasked by the WFA to assemble an official women's national team. England competed in its first international match against Scotland in Greenock on 18 November 1972, 100 years to the month after the first men's international.[2][8] The team overturned a two-goal deficit to defeat their northern opponents 3–2, with Sylvia Gore scoring England's first international goal.[9] Tom Tranter replaced Worthington as long term manager of the women's national football team and remained in that position for the next six years.[3]:94

1979–1993: Progress under Reagan

Martin Reagan was appointed to replace Tranter in 1979.[3]:100 England reached the final of the inaugural European Competition for Women's Football, after beating Denmark 3–1 on aggregate in the semi-finals. Despite resolute defending, including a spectacular goal line clearance from captain Carol Thomas, the England team lost the first away leg 1–0 against Sweden, after a header from Pia Sundhage, but won the second home leg by the same margin, with a goal from Linda Curl.[10] England lost the subsequent penalty shootout 4–3. Theresa Wiseman saved Helen Johansson's penalty but both Curl and Lorraine Hanson had their spot kicks saved by Elisabeth Leidinge.[11]

At the 1987 European Competition for Women's Football, England again reached the semi-finals but lost 3–2 after extra time against holders Sweden, in a repeat of the previous final. The team settled for fourth, after losing the third place play-off against Italy 2–1.[12] Reagan was sacked after England's 6–1 quarter-final loss against Germany at UEFA Women's Euro 1991, which left them unable to qualify for the inaugural FIFA Women's World Cup. John Bilton was appointed as head coach in 1991 after Barrie Williams's brief tenure.[3]:103–104

1993–1998: FA involvement

In 1993, the FA took over the running of women's football in England from the WFA, replacing Bilton with Ted Copeland as national team manager.[3]:105 England managed to qualify for UEFA Women's Euro 1995, having previously missed out on the last three editions, but were beaten 6–2 on aggregate over two legs against Germany.[13] Reaching the European semi-finals granted England a place at the World Cup for the first time. The team advanced from the group stage of the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup in Sweden, but lost out again to Germany 3–0 in the quarter-finals.[14]

1998–2013: Development under Powell

Hope Powell became the team's first full-time head coach in June 1998, succeeding her former coach Copeland.[15] The European Championship expanded in 1997 to eight teams and moved from a biennial event to a quadrennial one. England qualified via the play-offs for the 2001 competition held in Germany, despite recording their biggest loss (away against Norway 8–0) during qualification, but did not advance past the group stage.[16] England automatically qualified as hosts in 2005, but again did not make it to the semi-finals.[17]

Qualification for the World Cup changed for the 1999 edition. European qualifiers were introduced, so that teams no longer needed to rely on advancing to the latter stages of the European Championship. England qualified unbeaten for the 2007 World Cup in China, winning Group 5 in the European qualifiers and recording their biggest win (away against Hungary, 13–0) in the process, ending a 12-year hiatus from the competition.[18][19] After coming second in their group, they advanced into the quarter-finals to face the United States but lost 3–0.[20]

In May 2009, central contracts were implemented to help players focus on full-time training without having to fit it around full-time employment.[21][22] Three months later, at the European Championships in Finland, England marked their return to the recently expanded 12-team competition by reaching the final for the first time in 25 years. They advanced from Group C to the quarter-finals by virtue of being the top third-placed team, beating both the hosts and the Netherlands in the knockout stage on the way to the final. There they lost 6–2 to reigning champions Germany.[23]

England reached their third World Cup in 2011, having won Group 5 and their play-off 5–2 over two legs against Switzerland.[24][25] In Germany, they topped Group B – ahead of eventual winners Japan.[26] England were paired with France in the quarter-finals, with the match ending in a 1–1 draw. England had taken the lead with Jill Scott's chip, only to have Élise Bussaglia equalise with two minutes remaining. After extra time ended in stalemate, they lost the ensuing penalty shootout 4–3. Karen Bardsley had saved Camille Abily's initial penalty but misses by Claire Rafferty and Faye White sent England out of the competition.[27]

Powell left the role in August 2013 after a poor showing at the UEFA Women's Euro 2013, with England bowing out after the group stage.[15]

2013–2017: Sampson era

Welshman Mark Sampson succeeded Powell as England manager. England qualified for their third successive World Cup in August 2014 with a game to spare, winning all ten matches and topping Group 6.[28] England played their first international match at the new Wembley Stadium, home to the men's national team, in a friendly against the reigning European champions Germany on 23 November 2014. England had not played Germany since their heavy defeat in the European Championship final five years earlier. They lost the match 3–0, marking the 20th attempt at which England had failed to record an official win over Germany.[29][30]

At the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup in Canada, England lost their opening group game to France but won their remaining group games against Mexico and Colombia, easing through to the last 16 to play 1995 champions Norway. A 2–1 win set up a meeting with hosts Canada in the quarter-finals. Despite facing not only a strong Canadian team but a capacity partisan crowd at BC Place in Vancouver, England progressed to the semifinals of the Women's World Cup for the first time in their history with another 2–1 win, which also marked the first semifinal appearance by any England senior team since the men reached the last four of the 1990 World Cup in Italy. Playing reigning World Cup holders Japan in the semi-finals, England conceded a penalty kick, which Aya Miyama converted past Karen Bardsley. Japan then conceded a penalty as Yuki Ogimi clipped Steph Houghton and Fara Williams slotted it past Ayumi Kaihori to level the game. However, in the last minute of the game, Laura Bassett scored an own goal to send Japan through to the final.[31] England eventually finished in third place by beating Germany 1–0 after extra time after a Williams penalty, their first time beating their archrivals in the women’s game. It marked the best finish for any England senior team since the men’s team famously won the 1966 World Cup as hosts.[32]

England qualified for the UEFA Women's Euro 2017 in the Netherlands and won all three of their group games at the tournament. England beat France 1–0 in the quarter-finals before meeting hosts and eventual champions, the Netherlands. In the semi-finals, England conceded three goals without reply and were knocked out of the tournament.[33]

In September 2017, Sampson was sacked from his role as manager by the FA after evidence of "inappropriate and unacceptable" behaviour was uncovered during his tenure at Bristol Academy.[34] He was replaced by Phil Neville, who had played at Manchester United – including in their 1999 treble winning season – and Everton and been capped by the England men but had never before held a high-profile managing job.

2018–present: Neville's arrival

England Women's World Cup 2019
National team during 2019 Women's World Cup.

After being appointed manager, Neville's first games in charge were at the 2018 SheBelieves Cup. In their first game, England defeated France 4–1, then drew 2–2 against Germany. They went into the final game against the United States with the opportunity to win the tournament, but lost 1–0. Second place was the highest England had finished at the SheBelieves Cup.[35]

England continued with World Cup qualification in 2018. On 6 April they drew 0–0 against Wales. After the qualifying games in June, England and Wales were guaranteed the first two spots in qualifying Group 1,[36] and England's 3–0 win against Wales in August 2018 saw them clinch the group and qualify for the World Cup finals.[37]

In the 2019 SheBelieves Cup, England won the tournament for the first time after winning their first match 2–1 against Brazil, drawing 2–2 with the United States and defeating Japan 3–0.[38]

In the 2019 Women's World Cup in France, England won group D, beating local rivals Scotland and archrival Argentina to qualify for the knockout phase, before beating Japan. England beat both Cameroon and then Norway 3–0 to advance to the semifinal against United States in Lyon - the team’s third straight major tournament semifinal. However, similar to the previous two tournaments, England once again failed to make the final, losing 2–1.

Competitive record

England Women's Vs USA (16365773538)
England women's team in February 2015

FIFA World Cup

England have qualified for the FIFA Women's World Cup five times (1995, 2007, 2011, 2015, 2019) and failed to qualify for three competitions (1991, 1999, 2003). The England team reached the quarter-finals on three occasions, losing out to Germany in 1995, the United States in 2007 and France on penalties in 2011. In 2015, however, England earned the bronze medal for the first time, under Mark Sampson, by beating Germany in the third place play-off.

World Cup finals
Year Result GP W D* L GF GA GD
China 1991 Did not qualify
Sweden 1995 Quarter-finals 4 2 0 2 6 9 −3
United States 1999 Did not qualify
United States 2003
China 2007 Quarter-finals 4 1 2 1 8 6 +2
Germany 2011 Quarter-finals 4 2 2 0 6 3 +3
Canada 2015 Third place 7 5 0 2 10 7 +3
France 2019 Fourth place 7 5 0 2 13 5 +8
Total 5/8 26 15 4 7 43 30 +13
*Draws include knockout matches decided by penalty shoot-outs.

UEFA European Championship

England first entered the UEFA Women's Championship in 1984, reaching the final that year and in 2009. The team have reached the semi-finals on three other occasions (1989, 1995, 2017), but failed to make it out of the group stage in three other editions (2001, 2005, 2013). England did not qualify in 1989, 1991, 1993 and 1997.

Year Result GP W D* L GF GA
1984 Runners-up 4 3 0 1 4 2
Norway 1987 Fourth place 2 0 0 2 3 5
West Germany 1989 Did not qualify
Denmark 1991
Italy 1993
EnglandGermanyNorwaySweden 1995 Semi-finals 2 0 0 2 2 6
NorwaySweden 1997 Did not qualify
Germany 2001 Group stage 3 0 1 2 1 8
England 2005 Group stage 3 1 0 2 4 5
Finland 2009 Runners-up 6 3 1 2 12 14
Sweden 2013 Group stage 3 0 1 2 3 7
Netherlands 2017 Semi-finals 5 4 0 1 11 4
England 2021 Qualified as hosts
Total 9/13 28 11 3 14 40 51
*Draws include knockout matches decided by penalty shoot-outs.
**Red border colour denotes tournament was held on home soil.

Olympic Games

England does not participate in the Women's Olympic Football Tournament, as the country does not have its own National Olympic Committee (NOC). Since England falls under the jurisdiction of the British Olympic Association, remit for an Olympic football team requires support from all four Home Nation associations. The Scottish Football Association (SFA), the Football Association of Wales (FAW) and the Irish Football Association (IFA) have all previously objected to the premise over fears that the team would erode the independence of their individual football associations. However, members of its team have played for the Great Britain women's Olympic football team at London 2012 having been granted automatic qualification as the host nation.[39] The Home Nations once again agreed to a GB Women's team in time for Tokyo 2020 with England's result at the 2019 World Cup counting as the team's attempt to qualify. They successfully qualified as one of the last three remaining European nations.[40]

Minor tournaments

Year Round Position GP W D* L GS GA
England 1976 Pony Home Championship Winners, group stage 1st 2 2 0 0 9 1
Italy 1969 Unofficial European Championship Third place 3rd 2 1 0 1 5 4
Italy 1979 Unofficial European Championship Semi-finals 4th 4 2 1 1 6 4
Japan 1981 Mundialito Group stage 3rd 2 1 0 1 4 1
Italy 1984 Mundialito Semi-finals 3rd 4 0 2 2 3 6
Italy 1985 Mundialito Winners 1st 2 3 1 1 13 5
Italy 1988 Mundialito Winners 1st 4 3 1 0 8 2
United States 1990 North America Cup Group stage 3rd 4 1 1 2 3 7
Portugal 2002 Algarve Cup Group stage 9th 4 1 0 3 8 12
Portugal 2005 Algarve Cup Group stage 8th 4 3 1 0 13 0
China 2007 Four Nations Tournament Group stage 4th 3 0 2 1 3 0
Cyprus 2009 Cyprus Cup Winners 1st 4 3 1 0 14 3
Cyprus 2010 Cyprus Cup Group stage 5th 4 2 1 1 6 5
South Korea 2010 Peace Queen Cup Group stage 2nd 2 0 2 0 0 0
Cyprus 2011 Cyprus Cup Group stage 5th 4 2 0 2 4 4
Cyprus 2012 Cyprus Cup Group stage 4th 4 2 0 2 5 7
Cyprus 2013 Cyprus Cup Winners 1st 4 3 1 0 12 7
Cyprus 2014 Cyprus Cup Runners-up 2nd 4 3 0 1 7 2
Cyprus 2015 Cyprus Cup Winners 1st 4 3 1 0 8 2
United States 2016 SheBelieves Cup Group stage 3rd 3 0 1 2 1 3
United States 2017 SheBelieves Cup Group stage 3rd 3 1 0 2 2 3
United States 2018 SheBelieves Cup Runners-up 2nd 3 1 1 1 6 4
United States 2019 SheBelieves Cup Winners 1st 3 2 1 0 7 3
Total 7 titles 75 38 18 22 142 81

Players

For all past and present players who have appeared for the national team, see List of England women's international footballers (alphabetical)
Caps, goals, and recent players may be outdated or incorrect, as the FA does not maintain an easily accessible database of historical statistics.

Current squad

The following 23 players were named to the squad for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.[41]

Caps and goals are updated as of 6 July 2019 after the match against  Sweden.

Head coach: Phil Neville

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 GK Karen Bardsley 14 October 1984 (age 34) 81 0 England Manchester City
13 GK Carly Telford 7 July 1987 (age 32) 21 0 England Chelsea
21 GK Mary Earps 7 March 1993 (age 26) 5 0 England Manchester United

2 DF Lucy Bronze 28 October 1991 (age 27) 75 8 France Lyon
3 DF Alex Greenwood 7 September 1993 (age 25) 41 3 England Manchester United
5 DF Steph Houghton (captain) 23 April 1988 (age 31) 112 13 England Manchester City
6 DF Millie Bright 21 August 1993 (age 25) 32 0 England Chelsea
12 DF Demi Stokes 12 December 1991 (age 27) 54 1 England Manchester City
14 DF Leah Williamson 29 March 1997 (age 22) 8 0 England Arsenal
15 DF Abbie McManus 14 January 1993 (age 26) 16 0 England Manchester United
17 DF Rachel Daly 6 December 1991 (age 27) 27 3 United States Houston Dash

4 MF Keira Walsh 8 April 1997 (age 22) 20 0 England Manchester City
8 MF Jill Scott 2 February 1987 (age 32) 143 25 England Manchester City
16 MF Jade Moore 22 October 1990 (age 28) 50 1 England Reading
19 MF Georgia Stanway 3 January 1999 (age 20) 13 1 England Manchester City
20 MF Karen Carney 1 August 1987 (age 31) 144 32 Retired
23 MF Lucy Staniforth 2 October 1992 (age 26) 11 2 England Birmingham City

7 FW Nikita Parris 10 March 1994 (age 25) 41 13 France Lyon
9 FW Jodie Taylor 17 May 1986 (age 33) 46 18 United States Reign FC
10 FW Fran Kirby 29 June 1993 (age 26) 45 13 England Chelsea
11 FW Toni Duggan 25 July 1991 (age 27) 75 22 Unattached
18 FW Ellen White 9 May 1989 (age 30) 88 35 England Manchester City
22 FW Beth Mead 9 May 1995 (age 24) 19 5 England Arsenal

Recent call-ups

The following players have also been called up to the England squad within the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Ellie Roebuck 23 September 1999 (age 19) 2 0 England Manchester City v.  Spain, 9 April 2019
GK Sandy MacIver 18 June 1998 (age 21) 0 0 United States Clemson Tigers 2019 SheBelieves Cup PRE
GK Siobhan Chamberlain 15 August 1983 (age 35) 50 0 England Manchester United v.  Australia, 9 October 2018

DF Gemma Bonner 13 July 1991 (age 28) 11 1 England Manchester City v.  Spain, 9 April 2019
DF Hannah Blundell 25 May 1994 (age 25) 3 0 England Chelsea Training camp, January 2019
DF Gabrielle George 2 February 1997 (age 22) 2 0 England Everton Training camp, January 2019

MF Isobel Christiansen 20 September 1991 (age 27) 31 6 France Lyon 2019 SheBelieves Cup
MF Jordan Nobbs (vice-captain) 8 December 1992 (age 26) 56 7 England Arsenal v.  Sweden, 11 November 2018
MF Fara Williams 25 January 1984 (age 35) 170 40 England Reading v.  Australia, 9 October 2018

FW Chioma Ubogagu 10 September 1992 (age 26) 3 1 United States Orlando Pride v.  Spain, 9 April 2019
FW Lauren Hemp 7 August 2000 (age 18) 0 0 England Manchester City 2019 SheBelieves Cup PRE
FW Melissa Lawley 28 April 1994 (age 25) 11 1 England Liverpool Training camp, January 2019
FW Chloe Kelly 15 January 1998 (age 21) 1 0 England Everton v.  Austria, 8 November 2018
FW Lauren Bruton 22 November 1992 (age 26) 1 0 England Reading v.  Kazakhstan, 4 September 2018

Notes:

  • PRE = Preliminary squad
  • RET = Retired from international duty

Records

Carol Thomas was the first player to reach 50 caps in 1985, before retiring from representative football later that year, having amassed 56 caps. Fara Williams holds the record for England appearances, having played 170 times since 2001. She overtook previous record holder Rachel Yankey in August 2014, in a friendly against Sweden.[42] Yankey had passed Gillian Coultard's 119 record England women caps in September 2012, in a European qualifying match against Croatia, and Peter Shilton's 125 record England international caps in June 2013, in a friendly against Japan.[43]

Kelly Smith has scored the most goals for England, with 46 over a 20-year international career. She surpassed Karen Walker's record of 40 goals in September 2010, in a World Cup qualifying play-off against Switzerland.[44]

Most capped players

Fara Williams England Ladies v Montenegro 5 4 2014 377
Fara Williams is England's most capped player and second highest goalscorer with 40 goals in 170 appearances since 2001.
# Name England career Caps Goals Ref
1 Fara Williams 2001– 170 40 [45]
2 Karen Carney 2005–2019 144 32 [46]
3 Jill Scott 2006– 143 24 [47]
4 Alex Scott 2004–2017 140 12 [48]
5 Casey Stoney 2000–2018 130 6 [49]

Bold names denote a player still playing or available for selection.

Top goalscorers

# Name England career Caps Goals Average Ref
1 Kelly Smith 1995–2015 117 46 0.39 [50]
2 Karen Walker 1988–2003 83 40 0.48 [51]
Fara Williams 2001– 170 40 0.24 [45]
4 Hope Powell 1983–1998 66 35 0.53 [52]
5 Ellen White 2010– 88 35 0.39 [53]

Bold names denote a player still playing or available for selection.

Captains

Player England career
Sheila Parker 1972–1976
Carol Thomas (née McCune) 1976–1985
Debbie Bampton 1985–1991
Gillian Coultard 1991–1995
Debbie Bampton 1995–1997
Gillian Coultard 1997–2000
Mo Marley 2000–2001
Tara Proctor 2001
Karen Walker 2002
Faye White 2002–2012
Casey Stoney 2012–2014
Steph Houghton 2014–present

Recent schedule and results

All times are listed in GMT except where noted.

2019

See also

References

  1. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 12 July 2019. Retrieved 12 July 2019.
  2. ^ a b Gregory, Patricia (3 June 2005). "How women's football battled for survival". BBC Sport. Retrieved 17 March 2015.
  3. ^ a b c d e Lopez, Sue (1997). Women on the ball: a guide to women's football. London: Scarlet Press. ISBN 1857270215.
  4. ^ "Coppa del Mondo (Women) 1970". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 17 March 2015.
  5. ^ "Mundial (Women) 1971". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 17 March 2015.
  6. ^ "Women's Football" (PDF). Culture, Media and Sport Committee. p. 3. Retrieved 21 March 2015.
  7. ^ Williams, Jean (2003). A Game for Rough Girls? A History of Women's Football in Britain. London: Routledge. p. 36. ISBN 1135136149.
  8. ^ Mitchell, Paul. "The first international football match". BBC. Retrieved 9 April 2015.
  9. ^ Croydon, Emily (7 July 2013). "Women's Euros 2013: Women's football's forgotten heroines". BBC Sport. Retrieved 17 March 2015.
  10. ^ Saffer, Paul. "1984: Sweden take first title". UEFA. Retrieved 17 March 2015.
  11. ^ Leighton, Tony (19 May 2009). "England's shoot-out jinx begins – England, 1984". The Guardian. Retrieved 21 March 2015.
  12. ^ Saffer, Paul. "1987: Norway victorious in Oslo". UEFA. Retrieved 17 March 2015.
  13. ^ Saffer, Paul. "1995: Germany establish upper hand". UEFA. Retrieved 19 March 2015.
  14. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup – Sweden 1995". FIFA. Retrieved 19 March 2015.
  15. ^ a b "Hope Powell sacked as England women's manager". BBC Sport. 20 August 2013. Retrieved 17 March 2015.
  16. ^ "Germany too strong for England". BBC Sport. 30 June 2001. Retrieved 21 March 2015.
  17. ^ Oatley, Jacqui (14 June 2005). "England excitement all over too fast". BBC Sport. Retrieved 21 March 2015.
  18. ^ Leighton, Tony (8 September 2007). "England talk up World Cup chances". BBC Sport. Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  19. ^ Leighton, Tony (28 October 2005). "England's record victory boosts World Cup credentials for China". The Guardian. Retrieved 24 March 2015.
  20. ^ "USA send England out of World Cup". BBC Sport. 22 September 2007. Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  21. ^ Leighton, Tony (14 May 2009). "FA boosts England's women's team with central contracts". The Guardian. Retrieved 17 March 2015.
  22. ^ Williams, Jean (2011). "Woman's Football, Europe and Professionalization 1971–2011" (PDF). De Montfort University. pp. 72–73. Retrieved 24 March 2015.
  23. ^ Ashenden, Mark (10 September 2009). "England 2–6 Germany". BBC Sport. Retrieved 17 March 2015.
  24. ^ Leighton, Tony (21 August 2010). "Kelly Smith goals help England to 4–0 win over Austria". BBC Sport. Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  25. ^ "Swiss Women 2–3 England Women". BBC Sport. 16 September 2010. Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  26. ^ Stevenson, Jonathan (5 July 2011). "Women's World Cup: England 2–0 Japan". BBC Sport. Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  27. ^ Ashdown, John (9 July 2011). "England lose to France on penalties in Women's World Cup quarter-final". The Guardian. Retrieved 17 March 2015.
  28. ^ Leighton, Tony (17 September 2014). "England Women thrash Montenegro 10–0 in qualifier". BBC Sport. Retrieved 17 March 2015.
  29. ^ Thompson, Anna (23 November 2014). "BBC Sport – England 0–3 Germany". BBC Sport. Retrieved 17 March 2015.
  30. ^ "Deutschland vs England" (in German). German Football Association. Retrieved 17 March 2015.
  31. ^ "England's Laura Bassett's tears bring back Italia 90 memories". BBC Sport. 2 July 2015. Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  32. ^ "Women's World Cup: Germany Women 0–1 England Women". BBC Sport. 4 July 2015.
  33. ^ "Women's Euro 2017: England knocked out in semi-finals by Netherlands". BBC Sport. 3 August 2017. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  34. ^ "FA terminates Sampson's contract". The Football Association. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  35. ^ "Phil Neville's start as England women's coach: Three reasons to be positive and three causes for concern". 9 March 2018. Retrieved 23 July 2018.
  36. ^ "Standings". Retrieved 23 July 2018.
  37. ^ Pearlman, Michael (31 August 2018). "England beat Wales to reach Women's World Cup finals in France next year". BBC Sport. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  38. ^ Sanders, Emma (5 March 2019). "Japan Women 0–3 England Women". BBC Sport. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  39. ^ "Football Association wants Great Britain sides at Rio Olympics". BBC Sport. 3 March 2015. Retrieved 25 March 2015.
  40. ^ "Tokyo 2020 Olympics: Home nations agree to GB women's football team". BBC. 1 October 2018.
  41. ^ http://www.thefa.com/news/2019/may/08/world-cup-england-squad-080519
  42. ^ Dunn, Carrie. "From sleeping rough to England's caps record: the inspirational story of Fara Williams". Eurosport. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 21 March 2015.
  43. ^ "Rachel Yankey breaks Peter Shilton's 125 England caps". BBC Sport. 26 June 2013. Retrieved 21 March 2015.
  44. ^ "Smith's six of the best". FIFA. 4 February 2015. Retrieved 21 March 2015.
  45. ^ a b "Fara Williams". The Football Association. Retrieved 2 September 2017.
  46. ^ "Karen Carney". The Football Association. Retrieved 2 September 2017.
  47. ^ "Jill Scott". The Football Association. Retrieved 2 June 2019.
  48. ^ "Alex Scott". The Football Association. Retrieved 2 September 2017.
  49. ^ "Casey Stoney". The Football Association. Retrieved 2 September 2017.
  50. ^ "Kelly Smith". The Football Association. Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  51. ^ "Walker announces retirement". BBC Sport. 3 June 2003. Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  52. ^ Galvin, Robert. "Hope Powell". National Football Museum. Archived from the original on 8 August 2011. Retrieved 21 March 2015.
  53. ^ FIFA.com. "FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019™ - Players - Ellen WHITE - Ellen White - FIFA.com". www.fifa.com. Retrieved 27 June 2019.

External links

1990 FA Charity Shield

The 1990 FA Charity Shield (also known as the Tennent's FA Charity Shield for sponsorship reasons) was the 68th Charity Shield, a football match contested by the winners of the previous season's Football League and FA Cup competitions. The match was played on 18 August 1990 between 1989–90 Football League champions Liverpool and 1989–90 FA Cup winners Manchester United. This would be the last time either team was to share the trophy, as new regulations were brought in two years later that allowed for extra time and subsequently a penalty shootout if a draw occurred in normal time.

Utility player Clayton Blackmore opened the scoring for United in the first half, but a John Barnes penalty kick drew Liverpool level shortly after the break. The match finished at 1–1 and the two sides shared the trophy for six months each.

Absent from the game for Manchester United were captain Bryan Robson, who would be out of action until December that year due to injury; left-back Lee Martin who scored the winning goal in the FA Cup Final three months previously; and midfielder Neil Webb. Their places in the starting XI were taken by Clayton Blackmore, Mal Donaghy and newly signed full-back Denis Irwin, beginning a 12-year spell with the club that would reap numerous honours, while Paul Ince moved back into his usual midfield position.As a curtain-raiser to the match, the England women's national football team played Italy. Carolina Morace scored all four goals in England's 4–1 defeat and made it onto the front page of the following day's La Gazzetta dello Sport.

Barrie Williams

Barrie Williams (23 September 1937 – 23 April 2018) was a British football coach. He managed Sutton United during the 1980s and the England women's team during 1991. In January 1989, Williams led Sutton United, of the Football Conference, to a famous FA Cup win over top division Coventry City. A teacher of English Literature by profession, Williams was known for quoting Shakespeare and Kipling, as well as smoking a pipe. He later emigrated to Spain.

Dick Bate

Richard Bate (25 June 1946 – 25 April 2018) was an English football player and coach.

As a coach, he was the head of the youth Academy for Cardiff City, before leaving in 2015. Prior to that he was the Elite Coaching Manager of the Football Association, the governing body for football in England.

England women's national football team results – 2000s

This is a list of the England women's national football team results from 2000 to 2009.

England women's national football team results – 2010s

This is a list of the England women's national football team results from 2010 to the present day.

England women's national under-17 football team

The England women's national under-17 football team, also known as the Young Lionesses, represents England in association football at an under-17 age level and is controlled by the Football Association, the governing body for football in England. England women's national under-17 football team best achievement is a third-place finish at the 2016 UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship.

England women's national under-19 football team

The England women's national under-19 football team, also known as England women Under-19s or England women U19(s), is a youth association football team operated under the auspices of The Football Association. Its primary role is the development of players in preparation for the senior England women's national football team and is the second highest tier of development behind the under-21 level.

As long as they are eligible, players can play for England at any level, making it possible to play for the U19s, U21s or senior side, and again for the U19s. It is also possible to play for one country at youth level and another at senior level (providing the player is eligible).

The team's best achievement to date is winning the 2009 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship.

England women's national under-20 football team

The England women's national under-20 football team is a now defunct association football team that represented England women at under-20 level until 2018. It was governed by the Football Association (FA) since 1993, having been previously administered by the Women's Football Association (WFA). Although most national football teams represent a sovereign state, as a member of the United Kingdom's Home Nations, England is permitted by FIFA statutes to maintain its own national side that competes in all major tournaments. The team now operates as England Under-21s.

England women's national under-21 football team

The England women's national under-21 football team, also known as England women Under-21s or England women U21(s), is a youth association football team operated under the auspices of The Football Association. Its primary role is the development of players in preparation for the senior England women's national football team.

It was reinstated as an age group in 2018. Under the new system the team will help develop players after each U-20 World Cup. They will take part in the Nordic Cup previously contested by the now defunct U23s, and in non-World Cup years (bi-annually) will provide a World Cup-type programme to keep the flow and consistency of preparation for England seniors.

England women's national under-23 football team

The England women's national under-23 football team, also known as England women Under-23s or England women U23(s), is a now defunct association football team operated under the auspices of The Football Association until 2018. The team now operates as England Under-21s.

Its primary role was the development of players in preparation for the senior England women's national football team. As long as they were eligible, players could play for England at any level, making it possible to play for the U23s, senior side, and again for the U23s, as Natasha Dowie, Rachel Williams and Danielle Buet have done recently. In 2005 Casey Stoney played for the team in the Nordic Cup, despite already having 30 caps at senior level. It is also possible to play for one country at youth level and another at senior level (providing the player is eligible). Helen Lander and Kylie Davies decided to play for Wales at senior level after playing for England U23s, while Sophie Perry elected to play for Ireland.

Eric Worthington

Eric Senior Worthington (29 December 1925 – 16 November 2006) was an English professional footballer and football coach who played as a forward. After a playing career which included spells in the Football League with Watford and Bradford City, he was appointed the first ever manager of the England women's national team in 1972. He later coached the men's national teams of Australia and Papua New Guinea. He is a member of Australia's Football Hall of Fame.

Gemma Bonner

Gemma Bonner (born 13 July 1991) is an English football defender who plays for Manchester City Women and the England women's national football team. In November 2012 she signed for Liverpool Ladies of the FA WSL, after beginning her career with home town club Leeds United then spending two seasons with Chelsea in 2011 and 2012. She captained Liverpool to the 2013 FA WSL title and made her debut for the senior England women's national football team in September 2013. At UEFA Women's Euro 2013 Bonner was part of England's squad but did not play.

Hope Powell

Hope Patricia Powell, CBE (born 8 December 1966) is an English former international footballer and women's first-team manager of Brighton & Hove Albion. She was the coach of the England women's national football team and the Great Britain women's Olympic football team until August 2013. As a player, Powell won 66 caps for England, mainly as an attacking midfielder, scoring 35 goals. She made her England debut at the age of 16, and went on to play in the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup, England's first World Cup appearance. She was also vice-captain of her country. At club level Powell played in four FA Women's Cup finals and captained Croydon to a League and Cup double in 1996.

The Football Association (FA) appointed Powell as England's first-ever full-time national coach in 1998. She led the team at the 2001, 2005, 2009 and 2013 editions of the UEFA Women's Championship. After failing to qualify in 2003, she guided England to the quarter-finals of the FIFA Women's World Cup in 2007 and 2011. England's best results, reaching the final of the UEFA Women's Championship in 1984 and 2009, both featured Powell. She was a player at the former and coach at the latter.

As well as managing the England senior team, Powell oversaw the whole structure from Under-15s to the Under-23s, a coach mentoring scheme and The FA’s National Player Development Centre at Loughborough University. In May 2009 Powell's administration implemented central contracts, to help players focus on full-time training and playing, without having to fit it around full-time employment. Initially 17 players signed contracts. In 2003 Powell became the first woman to achieve the UEFA Pro Licence—the highest coaching qualification available.

Mark Sampson

Mark Sampson (born 18 October 1982) is a Welsh football coach, who is the current first-team coach of League Two club Stevenage.

Martin Reagan

Charles Martin Reagan (12 May 1924 – 26 December 2016), known as Martin Reagan, was an English professional footballer and coach / manager. During his playing career, Reagan played in the Football League for York City, Hull City, Middlesbrough, Shrewsbury Town, Portsmouth and Norwich City. He later coached the England women's national football team. Prior to his football career Reagan served as a Staff Sgt Tank Commander in World War II.

Mo Marley

Maureen "Mo" Marley MBE (née Mallon; born 31 January 1967) is an English football manager and former player. Since 2018, she has been manager of the England women's national under-21 football team. As a player, Marley was a centre back, who captained both the England women's national football team and Everton, turning out 41 times for England between 1995 and 2001.

Marley had a 24-year association with Everton, joining the club in their former incarnation as Leasowe Pacific in 1988. She won the 1989 Women's FA Cup and captained the team to the FA Women's Premier League title in 1997–98. After taking over as manager in 2002 — sacking her husband to do so — she led Everton to the 2008 FA Women's Premier League Cup and the 2010 FA Women's Cup. Marley led Everton into the UEFA Women's Champions League on three occasions, before standing down as manager in October 2012.

Ted Copeland

Ted Copeland is an English former football coach. He managed the England women's side between 1993 and 1998, leading them to a quarter-final appearance in the 1995 World Cup.Copeland spent 12 years working as a lecturer in Physical Education at the University of Petroleum and Minerals in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. While in Saudi Arabia, he also played for and coached Ettifaq FC in the Saudi Premier League and coached the Saudi Under-16 and Under-19 National Teams.He had a spell with Hartlepool United where he was first-team coach.In 1990, Copeland became the Football Association's Regional Director of Coaching for the North of England. In 1993, he added the part-time role of England women's coach to his duties and remained in both posts until 1998. His successor, Hope Powell became the first full-time manager of the England women's team.He later worked as director of sport at East Durham College and was director of education services for a sports marketing company, Navigator.In August 2006, Copeland and his wife Cindy took early retirement and moved to Parcent, Alicante.

The FA England Awards

The FA England Awards is an award ceremony hosted by The Football Association. The inaugural edition took place on 3 February 2003.

Tom Tranter

Thomas G. Tranter (1940–2005) was an English academic, and football player and football coach. He was head coach of the England women's national football team for six years during the 1970s.Tranter worked as a coach with Hayes and played for the first team. While coaching at amateur club Southall, Tranter motivated a young Gordon Hill who returned to the professional ranks with Millwall and went on to play for Manchester United and England.Tranter also coached at Woking, Slough Town and Brentford, as well as being sent on various foreign assignments in his capacity as a Football Association staff coach, including coaching the England's Women Team between 1973 and 1979. In 1979, he went to Iceland to coach Keflavík.In his academic career Tranter worked at Brunel University for 34 years and was made an honorary fellow in 2003, after retiring in July 2002.

FIFA Women's World Cup matches
Year Round Date Opponent Result Stadium
Sweden 1995 Group stage 6 June  Canada W 3–2 Olympia Stadion, Helsingborg
8 June  Norway L 0–2 Tingvallen, Karlstad
10 June  Nigeria W 3–2
Quarter-finals 13 June  Germany L 0–3 Arosvallen, Västerås
China 2007 Group stage 11 September  Japan D 2–2 Hongkou Stadium, Shanghai
14 September  Germany D 0–0
17 September  Argentina W 6–1 Chengdu Sports Center, Chengdu
Quarter-finals 22 September  United States L 0–3 Tianjin Olympic Centre Stadium, Tianjin
Germany 2011 Group stage 27 June  Mexico D 1–1 Volkswagen-Arena, Wolfsburg
1 July  New Zealand W 2–1 Rudolf-Harbig-Stadion, Dresden
5 July  Japan W 2–0 Impuls Arena, Augsburg
Quarter-finals 9 July  France D 1–1 (3–4 p) BayArena, Leverkusen
Canada 2015 Group stage 9 June  France L 0–1 Moncton Stadium, Moncton
13 June  Mexico W 2–1
17 June  Colombia W 2–1 Olympic Stadium, Montreal
Round of 16 22 June  Norway W 2–1 TD Place, Ottawa
Quarter-finals 27 June  Canada W 2–1 BC Place, Vancouver
Semi-finals 1 July  Japan L 1–2 Commonwealth Stadium, Edmonton
Third place play-off 4 July  Germany W 1–0 (aet)
France 2019 Group stage 9 June  Scotland W 2–1 Allianz Riviera, Nice
14 June  Argentina W 1–0 Stade Océane, Le Havre
19 June  Japan W 2–0 Allianz Riviera, Nice
Round of 16 23 June  Cameroon W 3–0 Stade du Hainaut, Valenciennes
Quarter-finals 27 June  Norway W 3–0 Stade Océane, Le Havre
Semi-finals 2 July  United States L 1–2 Parc Olympique Lyonnais, Décines-Charpieu
Third place play-off 6 July  Sweden L 1–2 Allianz Riviera, Nice
31 August 2018 WCQ G1Wales 0–3 EnglandNewport, Wales
19:45 Report Duggan Goal 57'
Scott Goal 60'
Parris Goal 69'
Stadium: Rodney Parade
Attendance: 5,053
Referee: Katalin Kulcsár (Hungary)
4 September 2018 WCQ G1Kazakhstan 0–6 EnglandPavlodar, Kazakhstan
Report Mead Goal 9' (pen.)Goal 82'
Daly Goal 35'
Christiansen Goal 54'
StaniforthGoal 66'
Bronze Goal 87'
Stadium: Tsentralniy
Referee: Hristiana Guteva (Bulgaria)
6 October 2018 FriendlyEngland 1–0 BrazilNottingham, England
12:30
Stadium: Meadow Lane
Attendance: 7,864
Referee: Sandra Braz Bastos (Portugal)
9 October 2018 FriendlyEngland 1–1 AustraliaLondon, England
Kirby Goal 21' Report Polkinghorne Goal 84' Stadium: Craven Cottage
Attendance: 6,068
Referee: Florence Guillemin (France)
8 November 2018 FriendlyAustria 0–3 EnglandMaria Enzersdorf, Austria
19:00 Summary
Report
Stadium: Bundesstadion Südstadt
11 November 2018 FriendlyEngland 0–2 SwedenRotherham, England
13:30 Report
Stadium: New York Stadium
Attendance: 9,561
Referee: Petra Pavlikova (Slovakia)
27 February 2019 SheBelieves CupEngland 2–1 BrazilChester, Pennsylvania
16:00 EST
Report
Stadium: Talen Energy Stadium
Attendance: 5,954
Referee: Ekaterina Koroleva (United States)
2 March 2019 SheBelieves CupUnited States 2–2 EnglandNashville, Tennessee
16:30 EST
Report
Stadium: Nissan Stadium
Attendance: 22,125
Referee: Marianela Araya (Costa Rica)
5 March 2019 SheBelieves CupJapan 0–3 EnglandTampa, Florida
17:15 EST Report
Stadium: Raymond James Stadium
Attendance: 8,580
Referee: Christina Unkel (United States)
5 April 2019 FriendlyEngland 0–1 CanadaManchester, England
19:00 Report
Stadium: Academy Stadium
Attendance: 5,682
Referee: Ivana Martincic (Croatia)
9 April 2019 FriendlyEngland 2–1 SpainSwindon, England
19:00
Report
Stadium: County Ground
Attendance: 13,449
Referee: Stephanie Frappart (France)
25 May 2019 FriendlyEngland 2–0 DenmarkWalsall, England
15:00
Report Stadium: Bescot Stadium
Attendance: 8,273
Referee: Desiree Grundbacher (Switzerland)
1 June 2019 FriendlyEngland 0–1 New ZealandBrighton and Hove, England
15:00 Report
Stadium: Falmer Stadium
Attendance: 20,076
Referee: Monika Mularczyk (Poland)
9 June 2019 2019 FIFA WWC GSEngland 2–1 ScotlandNice, France
18:00 CEST
Report
Stadium: Allianz Riviera
Attendance: 13,188
Referee: Jana Adámková (Czech Republic)
14 June 2019 2019 FIFA WWC GSEngland 1–0 ArgentinaLe Havre, France
21:00 CEST
Taylor Goal 61'
Report
Stadium: Stade Océane
Attendance: 20,294
Referee: Qin Liang (China)
19 June 2019 2019 FIFA WWC GSJapan 0–2 EnglandNice, France
21:00 CEST Report
Stadium: Allianz Riviera
Attendance: 14,319
Referee: Claudia Umpiérrez (Uruguay)
23 June 2019 2019 FIFA WWC R16England 3–0 CameroonValenciennes, France
17:30 CEST
Report
Stadium: Stade du Hainaut
Attendance: 20,148
Referee: Qin Liang (China PR)
27 June 2019 2019 FIFA WWC QFNorway 0–3 EnglandLe Havre, France
21:00 CEST Report
Stadium: Stade Océane
Attendance: 21,111
Referee: Lucila Venegas (Mexico)
2 July 2019 2019 FIFA WWC SFEngland 1–2 United StatesDécines-Charpieu, France
21:00 CEST
Report
Stadium: Parc Olympique Lyonnais
Attendance: 53,512
Referee: Edina Alves Batista (Brazil)
6 July 2019 2019 FIFA WWC 3rdEngland 1–2 SwedenNice, France
17:00 CEST
Report
Stadium: Allianz Riviera
Attendance: 20,316
Referee: Anastasia Pustovoitova (Russia)
29 August 2019 FriendlyBelgium v EnglandLeuven, Belgium
19:30 CEST Preview Stadium: Den Dreef
3 September 2019 FriendlyNorway v EnglandBergen, Norway
18:00 CEST Preview Stadium: Brann Stadion
9 November 2019 FriendlyEngland v GermanyLondon, England
17:30 Preview Stadium: Wembley Stadium
England squads – FIFA Women's World Cup
England squads – UEFA Women's Championship
England at the FIFA Women's World Cup
National teams
League system
Cup competitions
Active
Defunct
Other
General
Venues
Statistics
Awards
Results
Players
World Cups
European Championships
Other tournaments
Noted rivalries
Culture
Other FA teams
England women's national football team – managers

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.