Enemy of the state

An enemy of the state is a person accused of certain crimes against the state, such as treason. Describing individuals in this way is sometimes a manifestation of political repression. For example, an authoritarian regime may purport to maintain national security by describing social or political dissidents as "enemies of the state." In other cases, the individual in question may have in fact endangered the country and its population.

Examples

Political

Biography

Fictional

  • The fictional character Peter LaNague in the novel An Enemy of the State (The LaNague Federation, Book 1) by F. Paul Wilson.[11]
  • The fictional character Emmanuel Goldstein in the novel Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell.
  • In Resident Evil: Damnation, special agent Leon Kennedy is accused of being an enemy of the State by Svetlana Belikova (first female President of the Eastern Slav Republic) and orders her guards to attack him right after she briefly spars in one on one combat with him.[12]
  • The six main characters in Final Fantasy XIII are branded as enemies of the State following the destruction of Cocoon; the main events of the game revolve around them trying to survive and hopefully clear their names.
  • Tali'Zorah is accused of treason during her personal quest in Mass Effect 2.
  • In the TV series NCIS: New Orleans, the team hunt down a suspect known as "Matt S. O'Feeney," which was an anagram for eneMy OF State. The suspect was a dangerous man wanted by NCIS and Interpol for illegal arms dealing and other criminal activities.

See also

References

  1. ^ Constantin Fasolt (2004). The Limits of History. University of Chicago Press. pp. 168–. ISBN 978-0-226-23910-1. Retrieved 9 July 2013.
  2. ^ Frank N. Magill (15 April 2013). The Ancient World: Dictionary of World Biography. Routledge. pp. 1209–. ISBN 978-1-135-45740-2. Retrieved 9 July 2013.
  3. ^ Dorling, Philip. "US calls Assange 'enemy of state'", The Sydney Morning Herald. September 27, 2012.
  4. ^ Tate, Julie & Londoño, Ernesto (July 30, 2013). "Bradley Manning found not guilty of aiding the enemy, convicted on other charges". The Washington Post.CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link)
  5. ^ Gellman, Barton; Markon, Jerry (June 9, 2013). "Edward Snowden says motive behind leaks was to expose 'surveillance state'". The Washington Post. Retrieved June 10, 2013.
  6. ^ *Bea Edwards, American Whistleblowers in Prison and in Exile, Huffington Post, August 1, 2013.
  7. ^ "Rights defenders increasingly branded "enemies of the state" over development projects, UN expert warns". UN Human Rights. October 29, 2013. Retrieved November 1, 2013.
  8. ^ "FBI terrorism unit says 'black identity extremists' pose a violent threat". October 7, 2017. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  9. ^ Justin Raimondo, An Enemy of the State:The Life of Murray N. Rothbard, Prometheus Books, 2000, ISBN 1615922393
  10. ^ Bill Lueders, An Enemy of the State: The Life of Erwin Knoll, Common Courage Press, 1996, ISBN 1567510981
  11. ^ F. Paul Wilson, An Enemy of the State (The LaNague Federation, Book 1), Infrapress, 2005, ISBN 0976654423
  12. ^ Clip from Resident Evil 6, on YouTube.
All-New Wolverine

All-New Wolverine is a comic book series published by Marvel Comics that debuted in 2015 as part of the All-New, All-Different Marvel relaunch. The series is the first to star Logan's clone daughter Laura Kinney (formerly X-23) in the role as the Wolverine. The plot introduces Laura's clone sisters, the youngest of which, Gabby, end up becoming her companion during their adventures. The series has been well received.

Arthur J. Nascarella

Arthur J. Nascarella (born November 18, 1944) is an American actor who has appeared in dozens of films, most often playing a mobster or police officer. Among his notable film credits include a corrupt cop in Cop Land (1997), the hypocritical ambulance Captain Barney in Martin Scorsese's film Bringing Out The Dead (1999) and fed-up casino boss, Nicky "Fingers" Bonnatto in The Cooler (2003). He's played roles in the Spike Lee joints New Jersey Drive (1995), Clockers (1995), He Got Game (1998), Summer of Sam (1999) and BlacKkKlansman (2018). He also appeared and played roles in the films A Brooklyn State of Mind (1997), Witness to the Mob (1998), Happiness (1998), 54 (1998), Enemy of the State (1998), Knockaround Guys (2001), WiseGirls (2002), Running Scared (2006), World Trade Center (2006), Yonkers Joe (2008), and Solitary Man (2009).

He played fictional mobster and Capo Carlo Gervasi in the hit TV-series The Sopranos.

He currently appears on the Showtime series Billions as a local pizza shop owner.

Before he became an actor, Nascarella was a 21-year veteran of the NYPD. He also served eight years in the United States Marine Corps.

Dan Mindel

Ivor Daniel Mindel, ASC, BSC, SASC (born 27 May 1958) is a South African cinematographer best known for his work on blockbuster action films like Enemy of the State, Mission: Impossible III, Star Trek, and Star Wars: The Force Awakens, working with directors like Ridley Scott, Tony Scott and J. J. Abrams.

Enemy of the State (Homeland)

"Enemy of the State" is the first episode of the seventh season of the American television drama series Homeland, and the 73rd episode overall. It premiered on Showtime on February 11, 2018.

Enemy of the State (album)

Enemy of the State is the sixth studio album by American rapper C-Bo, released July 11, 2000 on C-Bo's own label West Coast Mafia Records and Warlock Records. It peaked at number 24 on the Billboard Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums and at number 91 on the Billboard 200. Enemy of the State was C-Bo's first album on his new label, West Coast Mafia, after leaving AWOL Records, which he did after the release of Til My Casket Drops. The album features guest performances by WC, Daz Dillinger, Killa Tay, Yukmouth, CJ Mac and Too Short. Along with a single, a music video was produced for the song, "Get The Money".

Enemy of the State (film)

Enemy of the State is a 1998 American action-thriller film directed by Tony Scott, produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, and written by David Marconi. The film stars Will Smith and Gene Hackman, with Jon Voight, Lisa Bonet, Gabriel Byrne, Loren Dean, Jake Busey, Barry Pepper, and Regina King in supporting roles. The film tells the story of a group of NSA agents conspiring to kill a Congressman and the cover up that ensues after a tape of the murder is discovered.

The film was released on November 20, 1998 in the U.S. and worldwide. Enemy of the State garnered generally positive reviews from film critics and audiences, with many praising the writing and direction as well as the chemistry between Smith and Hackman.

Enemy of the people

The term enemy of the people is a designation for the political or class opponents of the subgroup in power within a larger group. The term implies that by opposing the ruling subgroup, the "enemies" in question are acting against the larger group, for example against society as a whole. It is similar to the notion of "enemy of the state". The term originated in Roman times as Latin: hostis publicus, typically translated into English as the "public enemy". The term in its "enemy of the people" form has been used for centuries in literature (see An Enemy of the People, the play by Henrik Ibsen, 1882; or Coriolanus, the play by William Shakespeare, c. 1605). Currently this form is mostly used as a reference to Soviet phraseology.

Gene Hackman

Eugene Allen Hackman (born January 30, 1930) is a retired American actor and novelist. In a career that spanned nearly five decades, Hackman was nominated for five Academy Awards, winning Best Actor in The French Connection and Best Supporting Actor in Unforgiven. He won four Golden Globes, one SAG Award and two BAFTAs.

He first came to fame in 1967 with his performance as Buck Barrow in Bonnie and Clyde, when he received his first Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor. His major subsequent films include: I Never Sang for My Father (1970), when he received his second Best Supporting Actor nomination; The French Connection (1971) and French Connection II (1975), when he played Jimmy "Popeye" Doyle; The Poseidon Adventure (1972); The Conversation (1974); Superman: The Movie (1978), when he played arch-villain Lex Luthor; Hoosiers (1986); and Mississippi Burning (1988), when he received his second Best Actor nomination.

His film roles during the 1990s featured: Unforgiven (1992); The Firm (1993); The Quick and the Dead; Crimson Tide (1995); Get Shorty (1995); The Birdcage (1996); and Enemy of the State (1998) Later roles included: Behind Enemy Lines (2001); and The Royal Tenenbaums (2001). Hackman's final film appearance to date was the romantic comedy film Welcome to Mooseport in 2004, co-starring comedian Ray Romano.

Grant Heslov

Grant Heslov (born May 15, 1963) is an American actor, film producer, screenwriter and director, known for his producing and writing collaborations with George Clooney, which have earned him three Academy Award nominations. As a co-producer of Argo (2012), he received the Academy Award for Best Picture in 2013. As an actor, he has appeared in films including True Lies (1994), Black Sheep (1996), Enemy of the State (1998) and The Scorpion King (2002), as well as performing supporting roles in several films made with Clooney.

Jerry Bruckheimer

Jerome Leon Bruckheimer (born September 21, 1943) is an American film and television producer. He has been active in the genres of action, drama, fantasy and science fiction. His best known television series are CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, CSI: Miami, CSI: NY, Without a Trace, Cold Case, and the U.S. version of The Amazing Race. At one point, three of his TV series ranked among the top 10 in the U.S. ratings—a unique feat in television.Some of his best-known films include Flashdance, Top Gun, The Rock, Con Air, Armageddon, Enemy of the State, Black Hawk Down, Pearl Harbor, and the Beverly Hills Cop, Bad Boys, Pirates of the Caribbean and National Treasure franchises. He also serves as a Director at ZeniMax Media. Many of his films have been produced by Disney and Paramount, while many of his television series have been co-produced by Warner Bros. and CBS Television Studios. In July 2003, Bruckheimer was honored by Variety magazine as the first producer in Hollywood history to produce the top two highest-grossing films of a single weekend, Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl and Bad Boys II. He is also the co-founder and co-majority owner (along with David Bonderman) of the future National Hockey League team in Seattle.

Jon Voight

Jonathan Vincent Voight (; born December 29, 1938) is an American actor. He is the winner of one Academy Award, having been nominated for four. He has also won four Golden Globe Awards and has so far been nominated for eleven. He is the father of actress Angelina Jolie and actor James Haven.

Voight came to prominence in the late 1960s with his Oscar-nominated performance as Joe Buck, a would-be gigolo in Midnight Cowboy (1969). During the 1970s, he became a Hollywood star with his portrayals of a businessman mixed up with murder in Deliverance (1972); a paraplegic Vietnam veteran in Coming Home (1978), for which he won an Academy Award for Best Actor; and a penniless ex-boxing champion in the remake of The Champ (1979).

His output became sparse during the 1980s and early 1990s, although he won the Golden Globe and was nominated for an Academy Award for his iconic performance as the ruthless bank robber Oscar "Manny" Manheim in Runaway Train (1985). Voight made a comeback in Hollywood during the mid-1990s, starring in Michael Mann's crime epic Heat (1995) opposite Robert De Niro and Al Pacino. He portrayed Jim Phelps in Mission: Impossible (1996), a corrupt NSA agent in Enemy of the State (1998), and the unscrupulous attorney Leo F. Drummond in Francis Ford Coppola's The Rainmaker (1997), which earned him a Golden Globe nomination for Best Supporting Actor.

Voight gave critically acclaimed biographical performances during the 2000s, appearing as legendary sportscaster Howard Cosell in Ali (2001) for which his supporting performance was nominated for the Academy Award, the Golden Globe and a Critics Choice Award, and also as Nazi officer Jürgen Stroop in Uprising (2001), as Franklin D. Roosevelt in Michael Bay's Pearl Harbor (2001) and as Pope John Paul II in the eponymous miniseries (2005). Voight also appears in Showtime's Ray Donovan TV series, now in its sixth season as Mickey Donovan, a role that brought him newfound critical and audience acclaim and his fourth Golden Globe win in 2014.

List of films shot in Baltimore

Movies, TV shows, and documentaries filmed in Baltimore:

Absolute Power

The Accidental Tourist

Ace of Cakes

Airline

Along Came a Spider

Amazing Grace (1974)

America's Most Wanted

...And Justice For All

Avalon

Ax 'Em

Beauty Shop

The Bedroom Window

Boys

Cecil B. DeMented

Clara's Heart

The Corner

Cry-Baby

The Curve

Dave

Desperate Living

Detention

Diner

Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives

A Dirty Shame

The Distinguished Gentleman

Divine Trash

Enemy of the State

Failure to Launch

Female Trouble

First Invasion: War of 1812

First Sunday

For Richer or Poorer (1997)

Gods and Generals

Guarding Tess

Hag in a Black Leather Jacket

Hairspray (1988 version)

He Said, She Said

Head of State

Her Alibi

He's Just Not That Into You

Home for the Holidays

Homicide

Homicide: Life on the Street

Homicide: The Movie

Hook, Line and Dinner

House of Cards

The Invasion

House on Sorority Row

Ladder 49

Liberty

Liberty Heights

The Life of Bailey

Live Free or Die Hard

Major League II

Marnie

Maxum Xul

Men

Men Don't Leave

The Meteor Man

Mondo Trasho

The Mosquito Coast

Multiple Maniacs

On the Block

Pecker

The Photon Effect

Pink Flamingos

PolyesterPrincess

Putty Hill

Random Hearts

Red Dragon

The Replacements

Roc

Runaway Bride

The Salon

Satisfaction

The Seduction of Joe Tynan

Serial Mom

The Service

Shooter

Shot in the Heart

Silent Fall

Sleepless in Seattle

Something the Lord Made

Species II

Stage Fright

Step Up

Step Up 2: The Streets

The Sum of All Fears

That Night

Tin Men

Tuck Everlasting

Twelve Monkeys

Violets Are Blue

Veep

Washington Square

While You Were Out

The Wire

XXX: State of the Union

The Young Americans

Lupe Fiasco

Wasalu Muhammad Jaco (born February 16, 1982), better known by his stage name Lupe Fiasco ( LOO-pay), is an American rapper, record producer, and entrepreneur. He rose to fame in 2006 following the success of his debut album, Lupe Fiasco's Food & Liquor. He also performs as the frontman of rock band Japanese Cartoon under his real name. As an entrepreneur, Fiasco is the chief executive officer of 1st and 15th Entertainment.

Raised in Chicago, Jaco developed an interest in hip hop after initially disliking the genre for its use of vulgarity and misogyny. After adopting the name Lupe Fiasco and recording songs in his father's basement, 19-year-old Fiasco joined a group called Da Pak. The group disbanded shortly after its inception, and Fiasco soon met rapper Jay-Z who helped him sign a record deal with Atlantic Records. In September 2006, Fiasco released his debut album Lupe Fiasco's Food & Liquor on the label, which received three Grammy nominations. He released his second album, Lupe Fiasco's The Cool, in December 2007. The lead single "Superstar" became his first top 40 hit on the Billboard Hot 100. After a two-year delay, Lasers was released in March 2011 to mixed reviews; however, it became his first album to debut at number one on the Billboard 200. His latest album, Drogas Wave, was released in September 2018.

In addition to music, Fiasco has pursued other business ventures, including fashion. He runs two clothing lines, Righteous Kung-Fu and Trilly & Truly; he has designed sneakers for Reebok. He has been involved with charitable activities, including the Summit on the Summit expedition, and in 2010 he recorded a benefit single for victims of the 2010 Haiti earthquake. Fiasco is also noted for his anti-establishment views, which he has expressed in both interviews and his music.

Lupe Fiasco discography

The American rapper Lupe Fiasco has released seven studio albums, six mixtapes, seven soundtrack albums, 38 singles (including ten as a featured artist), and 37 music videos.

Fiasco has made music with a number of artists including international artists, such as Kanye West ("Touch the Sky"), Snoop Dogg ("Hi-Definition"), Pharrell Williams ("I Gotcha"), Jay Z ("Pressure"), DOUBLE, Joy Denalane and Dan the Automator. He has also made music with musicians outside of the hip hop genre, with artists such as Blake Lewis.

His debut album, Lupe Fiasco's Food & Liquor, was released in 2006. His second album, Lupe Fiasco's The Cool was his first album to be given an RIAA certification, being certified Platinum. Lupe Fiasco's The Cool has also spurred his first top 10 single, "Superstar". The song was also certified platinum by the RIAA.

Both of his first two albums have been met with positive feedback, with several critics labeling his debut as a masterpiece. Some critics have also stated Lupe Fiasco's The Cool as an even greater followup. His third studio album, Lasers, was released on March 8, 2011, and debuted at #1 on the US Billboard 200, making it his first number one album on the chart as well as his highest debut sales, with over 200,000 albums sold the first week. Lasers has also been certified Gold. The lead single for the album, "The Show Goes On" has been his most successful single to date, reaching the top 10, and has been certified 2x Platinum by the RIAA two years after "Superstar". Despite the success Lasers was met with mixed reviews from music critics. In 2012 he released his 4th studio album Food & Liquor II: The Great American Rap Album Pt. 1 and was promoted by four singles including "Battle Scars" which went platinum by the RIAA. The album was met with positive reviews. In 2015 he released his 5th studio album Tetsuo & Youth after being delayed several times. It debuted at number 14 on the charts and was met with critical acclaim from music critics and was ranked in many year end lists.

Regina King

Regina Rene King (born January 15, 1971) is an American actress and television director. She first gained attention in 1985 as Brenda Jenkins in the NBC television series 227. She would go on to star in both television and film, rising to greater prominence with roles like Dana Jones in Friday (1995), Marcee Tidwell in Jerry Maguire (1996), Riley and Huey Freeman on the hit animated series The Boondocks, and Detective Lydia Adams on Southland. For Southland, she earned two Critics' Choice Award nominations for Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series in 2012 and 2013.

From 2015 to 2017, King starred in the ABC anthology series American Crime, for which she received three Primetime Emmy Award nominations, winning twice, and was also nominated for a Golden Globe Award. Also from 2015 to 2017, she played Erika Murphy in the HBO drama The Leftovers, for which she received a Critics' Choice Television Award nomination. In 2018, she starred in the Netflix miniseries Seven Seconds, for which she won her third Emmy. King has a recurring role as Janine Davis in the CBS sitcom The Big Bang Theory, and has starred in various films, including Ray, Poetic Justice, Friday, and Legally Blonde 2.

In 2018, her performance as Sharon Rivers in the film If Beale Street Could Talk garnered critical acclaim, and earned her a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress and a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress.

Stuart Wilson (actor)

Stuart Conan Wilson (born 25 December 1946) is an English film and television actor, best known for his roles as Don Rafael Montero in The Mask of Zorro and Jack Edward Travis in Lethal Weapon 3.

The Conversation

The Conversation is a 1974 American mystery thriller film written, produced and directed by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Gene Hackman with supporting roles by John Cazale, Allen Garfield, Cindy Williams, Frederic Forrest, Harrison Ford, Teri Garr and Robert Duvall.

The plot revolves around a surveillance expert and the moral dilemma he faces when his recordings reveal a potential murder. Coppola cited the 1966 film Blowup as a key influence. However, since the film was released to theaters just a few months before Richard Nixon resigned as President, he felt that audiences interpreted the film to be a reaction to the Watergate scandal.

The Conversation won the Grand Prix du Festival International du Film, the highest honor at the 1974 Cannes Film Festival. It was nominated for three Academy Awards in 1974 and lost Best Picture to The Godfather Part II, another Francis Ford Coppola film. In 1995, it was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

Tony Scott

Anthony David Leighton Scott (21 June 1944 – 19 August 2012) was an English film director and producer. He was known for directing action and thriller films such as Top Gun (1986), Beverly Hills Cop II (1987), The Last Boy Scout (1991), True Romance (1993), Crimson Tide (1995), Enemy of the State (1998), Man on Fire (2004), Déjà Vu (2006), and Unstoppable (2010).

Scott was the younger brother of film director Sir Ridley Scott. They both graduated from the Royal College of Art in London. In 1995 both Tony and Ridley received the BAFTA Award for Outstanding British Contribution To Cinema. In 2010, they received the BAFTA Britannia Award for Worldwide Contribution to Filmed Entertainment. He committed suicide on 19 August 2012, by jumping off the Vincent Thomas Bridge in San Pedro, California.

Touchstone Pictures

Touchstone Pictures is a currently dormant American film distribution label of Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures. Touchstone typically releases films produced or distributed by Walt Disney Studios with more mature themes and darker tones that are targeted to adult audiences, than those released under the studio's main Walt Disney Pictures banner. As such, Touchstone is a pseudonym brand for the studio, and does not exist as a distinct business operation.Established on February 15, 1984 by then-Disney CEO Ron W. Miller as Touchstone Films, Touchstone operated as an active film production division of Walt Disney Studios during the 1980s through the early 2010s, releasing a majority of the studio's PG-13 and R-rated films. In 2009, Disney entered into a five year, thirty picture distribution deal with DreamWorks Pictures by which DreamWorks' productions would be released through the Touchstone banner. Touchstone then distributed DreamWorks' films from 2011 to 2016.

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