Empanada

An empanada is a type of baked or fried pasty in Hispanic cultures. The name comes from the Spanish verb empanar, and literally translates as "enbreaded", that is, wrapped or coated in bread.

Empanadas are made by folding dough over a stuffing, which may consist of meat, cheese, corn, or other ingredients.

Empanada
Empanada - Stu Spivack
Two empanadas
CourseAppetizer
Serving temperatureHot or cold
Main ingredientsPastry, filling
VariationsPastel, pasty

Origins

Empanadas trace back their origins to the northwest region of Spain, Galicia.[1][2][3] A cookbook published in Catalan in 1520, Libre del Coch by Robert de Nola, mentions empanadas filled with seafood in the recipes for Catalan, Italian, French, and Arabian food.[4][5]

By country and region

Argentina

Empanadas cordobesas (Argentina) caseras
Home made empanadas from Córdoba, Argentina

Argentine empanadas are often served during parties and festivals as a starter or main course. Shops specialize in freshly made empanadas, with many flavors and fillings.

The dough is made with wheat flour and beef drippings for the fillings which differs from province to province. Some places use chicken, and some places beef (cubed or ground depending on the region) spiced with cumin and paprika. Some other fillings are onion, boiled egg, olives, or raisins. Empanadas can be baked or fried. It also can contain ham, fish, humita (sweetcorn with white sauce), or spinach; a fruit filling is used to create a dessert empanada. For the interior regions, they can be spiced with peppers.

In those places (usually take-out shops) where several types are served, a repulgue, or pattern, is added to the pastry fold to distinguish the varieties (although it is more common nowadays to burn a letter – an abbreviated indication of the filling – into the dough). In larger cities, empanadas are eaten more as take-away food, sourced from restaurants specializing in this dish. They usually carry dozens of different varieties, which is not the case in northern provinces, where empanadas are usually made at home, with more traditional recipes.

During Lent and Easter, empanadas de Cuaresma fillings with fish (usually dogfish or tuna) are popular.[6]

Belize

Belize panades
Panades in Cayo District, Belize

In Belize, empanadas are known as panades. They are made with masa (corn dough) and typically stuffed with fish, chicken, or beans.[7] They are usually deep fried and served with a cabbage or salsa topping. Panades are frequently sold as street food.[8]

Cape Verde

Cape Verde cuisine features the pastel, as well. Cape Verdean pastéis are often filled with spicy tuna fish. One particular variety, the pastel com o diabo dentro (literally: Pastel with the devil within), is particularly spicy, and is made with a dough made from sweet potatoes and cornmeal.[9]

Chile

Empanada tray
Chilean-style empanadas

The empanada is considered the most symbolic food of the country.[10] Salvador Allende, the President of Chile from 1970 to 1973, emphasized the national character of his political project saying that it would be a "revolution with the flavor of red wine, and the scent of an empanada".[11]

Eating empanadas, especially the meat ones called "empanadas de pino", becomes more popular during September, the month that Chile celebrates las fiestas patrias or their independence.[12] They are eaten during meals like asados or Chilean barbeques, and are accompanied with drinks like la chicha and red wine.[13]

Meat empanadas ("de pino") are filled with ground beef, fried with white onion and are seasoned with garlic, hard-boiled eggs, olives, and sometimes raisins.[14] This version is known as the typical baked Chilean empanada, although it can also be fried.

Seafood empanadas are filled with crab, clams, sea snails, or special oysters called crassostrea and cheese. Different seafood can be used, and they are mixed with chopped white onion.[15]

Philippines

Empanada (Philippines)
Philippine fried empanadas, with ground beef, potatoes, carrots, cheese, and raisins in a thin, crisp crust

Filipino empanadas usually contain ground beef, pork or chicken, potatoes, chopped onions, and raisins (somewhat similar to the Cuban picadillo) in a somewhat sweet, wheat flour bread. There are two kinds available: the baked sort and the flaky fried type. To lower costs, potatoes are often added as an extender, while another filling is kutsay, or garlic chives (kutsay in Cebuano and Tagalog; 韭菜 kú-chhài in Lan-nang).

Empanadas in the northern part of the Ilocos are different. These usually have savoury fillings of green papaya, mung beans, and sometimes chopped Ilocano sausage (chorizo) and egg yolk.[16]

Sicily (Italy)

'Mpanatigghi
'Mpanatigghi

The 'Mpanatigghi are stuffed, consisting of halfmoon-shaped panzarotti filled with a mixture of almonds, walnuts, chocolate, sugar, cinnamon, cloves and minced beef.[17][18][19] These are typical of Modica, in the province of Ragusa, Sicily. They are also known as impanatiglie or dolce di carne (pasty of meat).[20]

They were probably introduced by the Spaniards during their rule in Sicily which took place in the sixteenth century; this is suggested from the etymology of the name which comes from the Spanish "empanadas or empanadillas" (empanada), as well as from the somewhat unusual combination of meat and chocolate, which occurs several times in the Spanish cuisine.[17][18][21] In past centuries for the preparation of 'mpanatigghi game meat was used but today beef is used.[17]

Empanadas Venezolanas
Venezuelan empanadas

United States

Empanadas, mainly based on South American recipes, are widely available in New York City, New Jersey, and Miami from food carts, food trucks, and restaurants.[22] Empanadas are usually found in U.S. areas with a large Hispanic population, San Antonio, [23][24] and Los Angeles.[25]

See also

  • iconFood portal

References

  1. ^ "Historia de la empanada criolla" (PDF). Dra. Susana Barberis. Retrieved 8 July 2010.
  2. ^ Penelope Casas (1982), The Food, Wines, and Cheeses of Spain, Alfred A. Knopf, New York 1982 (p. 52)
  3. ^ "Breve historia de la alimentación en Argentina". Liliana Agrasar. Retrieved 8 July 2010. They first appeared in medieval Iberia during the time of the Moorish invasions.
  4. ^ Adamson, Melitta Weiss (2004). Food in medieval times. Greenwood Publishing Group. ISBN 0-313-32147-7.
  5. ^ Lady Brighid ni Chiarain. "An English translation of Ruperto de Nola's Libre del Coch". Stefan's Florilegium. Retrieved January 31, 2011.
  6. ^ "Argentine Atún Empanadas". Retrieved 26 January 2015.
  7. ^ "Belizean Food". Belize.com. ITM Ltd. Archived from the original on 2015-12-02. Retrieved 1 December 2015.
  8. ^ Kraig, Bruce; Sen, Colleen Taylor, eds. (2013). Street Food Around the World: An Encyclopedia of Food and Culture. Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO. p. 72. ISBN 978-1-59884-954-7.
  9. ^ Hamilton, Cherie. Cuisines of Portuguese Encounters, Hippocrene Books. 2001.
  10. ^ Eyzaguirre Lyon (1986), p. 24
  11. ^ Gonzalo Martner Fanta, p. 23
  12. ^ "La ruta de las empanadas", La Segunda. 11 September 2012.
  13. ^ The Chilean empanada, This is Chile, November 3, 2009
  14. ^ Pereira Salas (1977), p. 60
  15. ^ Chile Travel Pulse, March 3, 2017
  16. ^ Ian Ocampo Flora (April 23, 2010). "Vigan Empanada and the gastronomic treats of Ilocos". www.sunstar.com.ph. Archived from the original on 5 May 2010. Retrieved 30 December 2010.
  17. ^ a b c Red. Spe. (31 July 2013). "Quanto è "dolce" Ragusa". Corriere del Mezzogiorno.
  18. ^ a b Giovanni Assenza (2014). Miele, garofano, cannella. I profumi dei dolci di Sicilia. Assenza. ISBN 605-030-594-3.
  19. ^ Nicky Pellegrino (2013). The Food of Love Cookery School. Hachette UK. ISBN 1-4091-3381-8.
  20. ^ Monica Cesari Sartoni (2005). Mangia italiano. Guida alle specialità regionali italiane. Morellini Editore. ISBN 88-89550-05-8.
  21. ^ Touring Club of Italy (2005). Authentic Sicily. Touring Editore. ISBN 88-365-3403-1.
  22. ^ "10 Spots To Score Excellent Empanadas In NYC" Archived 2016-07-08 at the Wayback Machine by Angely Mercado, Gothamist, 13 October 2014;
    "NYC Food Truck Lunch: Empanadas From La Sonrisa Empanadas" by Perry R., CBS New York, 9 October 2015
  23. ^ "The 15 Best Places for Empanadas in San Antonio". FourSquare. Retrieved January 4, 2017.
  24. ^ Rice, Janae. "Finding Empanadas in SA". San Antonio Current. Retrieved January 4, 2017.
  25. ^ Chabala, Tracy. "5 Great Baked Empanadas in Los Angeles". LA Weekly. Retrieved January 4, 2017.

External links

Banana cue

A Banana cue or Banana Q (Tagalog: Banana kyu) is a popular snack food or street food in the Philippines. The "cue" in the name is an abbreviation of barbecue, which in Philippine English refers to meat cooked in a style similar to satay.

Batac

Batac (Ilokano: Siudad ti Batac), officially the City of Batac, is a component city in the province of Ilocos Norte, Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 55,201 people.It is located in the northwest corner of Luzon island, about 11 kilometres (6.8 mi) from the eastern shores of the South China Sea. The municipalities of Banna, Currimao, Paoay, Pinili, Sarrat, Marcos and San Nicolas form its boundaries. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 55,201 people.Batac is 470 kilometres (290 mi) from Metro Manila and 17 kilometres (11 mi) from Laoag, the provincial capital.

Chebureki

Chebureki, sometimes spelled chiburekki (Crimean Tatar: çiberek, Turkish: çiğ börek), is a deep-fried turnover with a filling of ground or minced meat and onions. It is made with a single round piece of dough folded over the filling in a crescent shape. A national dish of the Crimean Tatars and traditional for the Caucasian and Turkic peoples, it is also popular as snack and street food throughout Transcaucasia, Central Asia, Russia, Ukraine, Eastern Europe, as well as with the Crimean Tatar diasporas in Turkey and Romania.

Coyotas

Coyotas are empanada-like cookies which are large, flat and traditionally filled with brown sugar. However, coyotas also come in a variety of flavors, including guava, caramel, chocolate, strawberry, jamoncillo (milk candy), peach, and pineapple.

Curry puff

Curry puff (Malay: Karipap, Epok-epok; Chinese: 咖哩角,咖哩饺; pinyin: gālí jiǎo; Thai: กะหรี่ปั๊บ, RTGS: karipap, pronounced [kā.rìː.páp]) is a snack of Southeast Asian origin. It is a small pie consisting of curry with chicken and potatoes in a deep-fried or baked pastry shell. The curry is quite thick to prevent it from oozing out of the snack.

A common snack in Malaysia and Singapore, the curry puff is one of several "puff" type pastries with different fillings, though now it is by far the most common. Other common varieties include eggs, sardines and onions or sweet fillings such as yam.

Curry puffs are enjoyed throughout Brunei, Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore and Thailand. It also shares many similarities with the empanada, a popular pastry in Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking countries.

Famaillá

Famaillá is a city in the province of Tucumán, Argentina, located 30 km south from the provincial capital San Miguel de Tucumán. It has 22,924 inhabitants as per the 2010 census [INDEC], and is the head town of the Famaillá Department.

The city is called the "National Capital of the Empanada". It hosts a festival dedicated to it every September.

The area hosts an experimental agricultural station of the National Institute of Agro-Technology (Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria, INTA). Its economy is based on exports of sugar and strawberry.

Famaillá was the site of the Battle of Monte Grande in 1841, between the forces loyal to Juan Manuel de Rosas commanded by Manuel Oribe and the League of the North, led by Juan Lavalle.

Humita

Humita (from Quechua humint'a) is a Native American dish from pre-Hispanic times, and a traditional food in Bolivia, Chile, although their origin is unclear. In Chile, they are known as humitas, in Bolivia as humintas, in Brazil as pamonha, and in Venezuela as hallaquitas. It consists of masa harina and corn, slowly steamed or boiled in a pot of water.

Knish

A knish is a Jewish Central and Eastern European snack food consisting of a filling covered with dough that is either baked, grilled, or deep fried.

Knishes can be purchased from street vendors in urban areas with a large Jewish population, sometimes at a hot dog stand or from a butcher shop. It was made popular in North America by Central and Eastern European Jewish immigrants from the Pale of Settlement (mainly from present-day Belarus, Poland, Lithuania and Ukraine).In most Central and Eastern European traditional versions, the filling is made entirely of mashed potato, ground meat, sauerkraut, onions, kasha (buckwheat groats), or cheese. Other varieties of fillings include sweet potatoes, black beans, fruit, broccoli, tofu, or spinach.

Knishes may be round, rectangular, or square. They may be entirely covered in dough or some of the filling may peek out of the top. Sizes range from those that can be eaten in a single bite hors d'oeuvre to sandwich-sized.

Lörtsy

Lörtsy is a thin, half-moon shaped pastry originally invented in Savonlinna, eastern Finland. It can be made with a variety of fillings; the most common ones are either a savoury meat filling or a sweet apple filling.A meat lörtsy contains a meat and rice filling similar to the Finnish meat pie. Street vendors may offer it with the same condiments as the meat pie, such as a pickled cucumber and chopped raw onion, and with an optional hot dog sausage. When served with condiments on the street, it is folded around them like a taco.

The apple lörtsy contains a sweet apple jam, and resembles a jam doughnut.

The lörtsy is associated with eastern Finland, particularly the region around Savonlinna, but nowadays can be found all over Finland from street vendors and in some supermarkets.

Meat pie

A meat pie is a pie with a filling of meat and often other savory ingredients. They are popular in the United Kingdom, Australia, Ghana, Nigeria, Europe, New Zealand, Canada, Zimbabwe and South Africa.

Mexican street food

Mexican street food, called antojitos (literally "little cravings"), is prepared by street vendors and at small traditional markets in Mexico. Street foods include tacos, tamales, gorditas, quesadillas, empalmes, tostadas, chalupa, elote, tlayudas, cemita, pambazo, empanada, nachos, chilaquiles, fajita and tortas, as well as fresh fruit, vegetables, beverages and soups such as menudo, pozole and pancita. Most are available in the morning and the evening, as mid-afternoon is the time for the main formal meal of the day.

Mexico has one of the most extensive street food cultures in Latin America, and Forbes named Mexico City as one of the foremost cities on the world in which to eat on the street.

Natchitoches meat pie

The Natchitoches meat pie is a regional dish from northern Louisiana, United States. It is one of the official state foods of Louisiana.

Panzerotti

A panzerotto (Italian: [pantseˈrɔtto]) (listen ), also known as panzarotto (Italian: [pantsaˈrɔtto]) plural panzerotti, is a savory turnover which resembles a small calzone, both in shape and in the dough used for its preparation. The term usually applies to a fried turnover rather than an oven-baked pastry (i.e. a calzone), though calzoni and panzerotti are often mistaken for each other.Panzerotto originates in Central and Southern Italian cuisine but is now popular in the United States and Canada as well, where it is often called panzerotti (listen ) or panzarotti as a singular noun (plural panzerotties/panzarotties or panzarottis/panzarottis).

Pastel (food)

Pastel is the name given to different typical dishes invented by Chinese expats in Brazil.

Pasteles

Pasteles (Spanish pronunciation: [pasˈteles]; singular pastel), also known as pastelles in the English-speaking Caribbean, are a traditional dish in several Latin American and Caribbean countries. In Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Trinidad and Tobago, the Caribbean coast of Colombia, and Panama, it is similar to a tamale. In Central American cuisine, it more closely resembles a British pasty or an Italian calzone. In other Spanish-speaking countries, pastel is a generic term for pastry. In Hawaii, they are called pateles in a phonetic rendering of the Puerto Rican pronunciation of pasteles, as discussed below.

Plăcintă

Plăcintă is a Romanian, Moldovan and Ukrainian traditional pastry resembling a thin, small round or square-shaped cake, usually filled with apples or a soft cheese such as Urdă.

Salteña

A salteña is a type of baked empanada from Bolivia.

Salteñas are savory pastries filled with beef, pork or chicken mixed in a sweet, slightly spicy sauce containing olives, raisins and potatoes. Vegetarian salteñas are sometimes available at certain restaurants.

Typically salteñas can be found in any town or city throughout the country, but each area has its variations; Cochabamba and Sucre claim to have the best version of this snack, and many will go out of their way to try the variation from Potosí. In La Paz, it is a tradition to enjoy salteñas as a mid-morning snack, although vendors often start selling salteñas very early in the morning. The pastries are sold anywhere from 7am to noon; most vendors sell out by mid-morning.

Santa Cruz de la Sierra

Santa Cruz de la Sierra (Spanish: [ˈsanta ˈkɾuz ðe la ˈsjera]; lit. 'Holy Cross of the Mountain Range'), commonly known as Santa Cruz, is the largest city in Bolivia and the capital of the Santa Cruz department. Situated on the Pirai River in the eastern Tropical Lowlands of Bolivia, the city of Santa Cruz and its metropolitan area are home to over 70% of the population of the department and it is one of the fastest-growing cities in the world.

The city was first founded in 1561 by Spanish explorer Ñuflo de Chavez about 200 km (124 mi) east of its current location, and was moved several times until it was finally established on the Pirai River in the late 16th century. For much of its history, Santa Cruz was mostly a small outpost town, and even after Bolivia gained its independence in 1825 there was little attention from the authorities or the population in general to settle the region. It was not until after the middle of the 20th century with profound agrarian and land reforms that the city began to grow at a very fast pace.

The city is Bolivia's most populous, produces nearly 35% of Bolivia's gross domestic product, and receives over 40% of all foreign direct investment in the country. This has helped make Santa Cruz the most important business center in Bolivia and the preferred destination of migrants from all over the country.

Turnover (food)

A turnover is a type of pastry made by placing a filling on a piece of dough, folding the dough over, sealing, and baking it. Turnovers can be sweet or savory and are often made as a sort of portable meal or dessert, similar to a sandwich. They are often eaten for breakfast.

It is common for sweet turnovers to have a fruit filling and be made with a puff pastry or shortcrust pastry dough; savory turnovers generally contain meat and/or vegetables and can be made with any sort of dough, though a kneaded yeast dough seems to be the most common in Western cuisines. They are usually baked, but may be fried.

Savory turnovers are often sold as convenience foods in supermarkets. Savory turnovers with meat or poultry and identified as a turnover in the United States (for example, "Beef Turnover" or "Cheesy Chicken Turnover") have to meet a standard of identity or composition and should contain a certain amount of meat or poultry. In Ireland, a turnover is a particular type of white bread, commonly found in Dublin.

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