Emilio de Villota

Emilio de Villota Ruíz (born 26 July 1946) is a former racing driver from Spain, born in Madrid. He entered 15 Formula One World Championship Grands Prix between 1976 and 1982, qualifying twice. He entered most Spanish Grand Prix between 1976 and 1982 and became a major force in the short-lived Aurora AFX Formula One Championship for F1 cars, winning the title in 1980.[1][2]

Emilio de Villota
Born26 July 1946 (age 72)
Madrid, Spain
Formula One World Championship career
NationalitySpain Spanish
Active years19761978, 19811982
TeamsRAM, non-works McLaren, non-works Williams, March
Entries15 (2 starts)
Championships0
Wins0
Podiums0
Career points0
Pole positions0
Fastest laps0
First entry1976 Spanish Grand Prix
Last entry1982 Dutch Grand Prix

Career

De Villota first arrived on the international motor sport scene in 1972, when he raced a SEAT 124 SC, in the 4 Horas de Jarama, a round of the European Touring Car Championship [ETCC]. In a car entered by Scuderia Filipinetti, was co-driven by H. Hengstenberg to 15th place overall. De Villota would not return to international motor sport until 1975, when he re-visited the ETCC, this time in a Ford Capri RS 2600, this time aided by Jorge de Bagration. The pair did not finish in the Zandvoort Trophy, held at the Circuit Park Zandvoort. However, when the Spanish pairing were joined by "Nicha" Cabral, for their home race, the 4 Horas de Jarama, they finished second, albeit five laps adrift of the winner.[3][4]

For 1976, de Villota turned his back on Touring Cars to try his luck in single-seaters, with the ultimate aim of racing in the World Championship. In order to gain experience of high-powered racing cars, he entered the Shellsport G8 International Series. This was a UK-based Formula Libre championship which ran F1, F2, F5000 and Formula Atlantic cars in the same races. Racing with the Lyncar Engineering Ltd., de Villota scored two 5th places, and finished the season 14th in the overall standings.[5][6]

Using a regulation which allowed the participation of private teams or drivers who could purchase a car and race alongside the official teams, de Villota debuted in the 1976 World Championship driving a Cosworth powered Brabham BT44B, purchased in effect to participate in the Gran Premio de España. De Villota failed to qualify, and did not return until the following season.[7][8]

De Villota returned to England for the start of the next season, once again racing for Lyncar which was now entered under the name of Iberia Airlines, winning for opening race of the 1977 Shellsport G8 International Series, at Mallory Park. However, after just four meetings, de Villota abandoned the series for F1.[6][9]

In 1977, de Villota developed a more ambitious project that would make him the third Spaniard to participate in Formula 1 after Alfonso de Portago and Alex Soler-Roig. Under the sponsorship of Iberia, de Villota led a modest outfit that raced under the name of Iberia Airlines F1 and contested seven Grands Prix of the European season. For the project Iberia acquired a McLaren M23, Ford-Cosworth DFV engines, the cars painted in the colours of the airline. De Villota would qualify for just two of these Grands Prix, the first was his home event, Gran Premio de España, where he would finish 13th, albeit 5 laps adrift of the winner. The other race he started was the Grand Prix von Österreich, where an accident on the last lap deprived him of the finish, nevertheless classified in 17th position.[7][10][11][12]

Between Grands Prix, de Villota did a number of selected Shellsport G8 races in his F1 McLaren, winning twice. He followed his earlier victory at Mallory, by winning there again, then taking the chequered flag at Brands Hatch. Although his season was split in two by his Grand Prix racing, de Villota still finished 5th in the championship.[6][9]

Again he attempted to privately contest the 1978 Gran Premio de España, failing again in qualifying. After this failure he turned his back on Formula One and turned his attention to the new Aurora AFX Formula One Championship. In the Aurora championship, racing was cheaper and was therefore less dependent on sponsorships, thus making it more competitive. This proved to be the case with de Villota finishing 3rd overall in 1978 and 1979, then being proclaimed champion in 1980 with a RAM Racing prepared Williams FW07. During this spell, he won nine races, including the infamous Gran Premio Lotteria di Monza.[7][13][14][15]

His main focus for 1978, was the Aurora AFX F1 Championship. This series replaced the Shellsport Group 8 series. He continued to race his McLaren, now entered under the Centro Asegurado banner. The season started promising the trip to the podium in the first three races, however he was unable to keep the momentum going and failed to visit the podium again, although it was still enough to finish 3rd overall at the end of the season.[6][13]

For the 1979 Aurora AFX F1 Championship, de Villota switched to Lotus-Cosworth 78, prepared and entered by Madom F1 Team. Following a series of poor results, de Villota turned his season around by finishing on the podium in six straights races, winning four of them at Thruxton, Zandvoort, Oulton Park, and Nogaro. Then his poor early season form returned with three retirements in the last five races, with only one point finish. This left him 3rd once again in the overall standings.[6][14]

He again tried to qualify for the 1980 Gran Premio de España at the wheel of a RAM Racing prepared Williams-Cosworth FW07, which Banco Occidental sponsorship. Originally scheduled to be part of the Formula One World Championship, following the running of the race it was announced that World Championship points would not be awarded to the competitors, making it a non-championship race. He distinguished himself during the race by tripping up both Carlos Reutemann and Jacques Laffite in their battle for the lead.[7][16]

Back in the Aurora AFX F1, de Villota was at the wheel of the same Williams FW07, as he raced in Spain. Having switched to RAM Racing for the Aurora series as well, de Villota brought the FW07 home, on the podium in nine of eleven races he entered, winning five of them. Twice at Mallory Park, Brands Hatch, Silvestone and the big money event in Italy, the Gran Premio Lotteria di Monza. For one race, RAM switched de Villota to their Fittipaldi F5A, in which he still finished in 5th position. Adding this to the other trips to the podium, de Villota was crowned champion.[6][15]

For 1981, de Villota made the switch to the World Endurance Championship of Drivers. Having signed for Team Lola, to race their Group 6 Cosworth DFV powered Lola T600, alongside Guy Edwards, they made a poor start to the season, failing to finish their first two races. After an 8th place in the ADAC 1000 km Rennen Nürburgring, the pair are joined by Juan Fernández, for what would be de Villota's first race at the Circuit de la Sarthe. The trio finish 15th overall, and 3rd in class. The strong result from Le Mans inspired de Villota and Edwards who would win their next race, the Coppa Florio, 6 ore Enna-Pergusa by two laps, albeit from a field made up by entrants from the Italian Group 6 Championship. The pair would win once more in 1981, this time for season finale, Flying Tiger 1000. In the intermittent rain at Brands Hatch, they would win by a margin of eight laps.[3][17][18][19]

In 1982 made his final attempt to qualify for another Formula 1 race. As a privateer again (with LBT Team March) and this time in a March 821, powered by Ford Cosworth, sought qualification, unsuccessfully for five Grands Prix, It was to be the first time in his career as a racing driver, he would crossed the Atlantic to compete outside Europe.[7]

Away from F1, de Villota continued to race sportscar, in the new Group C category with the Grid Plaza Racing team. The team was under-financed, and undertook a limited World Endurance Championship for Drivers and Manufacturers and Camel GT Championship programme in 1982, and only once finished in the points, claiming 10th in the Shell Oils 1000 Kilometres, at Brands Hatch, when de Villota was joined by Derek Daly and Fred Stiff.[3][20]

De Villota continued with Grid Racing into 1983. However, their Cosworth-powered Grid S1 remained unreliable, with de Villota only finishing once in the points. Like 1982, this was at Brands Hatch, in the European Endurance Championship race. For the Grand Prix International 1000km, he was joined by Skeeter McKitterick and Dudley Wood, as they bring the Grid home in 8th place. Away from sportscars, de Villota tried his hand in two other categories with very mixed success. He had two drives in Formula Two; a 9th place at Silverstone with James Gresham Racing, in their March-BMW 832 and 13th at Jarama, for Minardi Team Srl aboard their Minardi-BMW M283. The other category was away from the international scene. Driving a Ford Capri RS3000, de Villota won the Spanish Touring Car Championship.[3][6][20][21][22]

For 1984, Grid Racing had produced a new car, the Grid-Porsche S2. De Villota raced the car in the Budweiser Grand Prix of Miami, but did not complete a lap. He did not race again that season. He did return to the ETCC in 1985 with Escuderia Mezquita, taking in two races. He co-drove with Francisco Romero, finishing both races; 18th in the Vallelunga 500 km and 17th in the Donington 500, in their VW Golf GTi.[3][23][24]

Having obtained Spanish backing from Danone for 1986, John Fitzpatrick Racing needed two Spanish drivers. De Villota was one, and he was joined at the team by Fermín Velez. Although the pair only racing seven times, they scored five top ten finished in the Porsche 956. This included a 3rd in the ADAC Kouros 1000 km Nürburgring, and a 4th in the 24 Hour of Le Mans. This would be de Villota's last trip to Le Mans 24 hours.[3][6]

The opening two races of the 1987 World Sport-Prototype Championship was held in Spain, Kremer Racing paired two local drivers for these races. Paco Romero joined de Villota in the Marlboro-sponsored Porsche 962C. The pair finished 10th at Jarama and then 8th at Jerez. De Villota stepped away from Group C racing, to race to 8th overall in the Porsche 944 Turbo Cup.[3][6]

By 1988, de Villota had retired from International racing, although he still won three Spanish Porsche Carrera Cup Championships in four years (1993, 1995 and 1996) at national level. However, in 1996 he raced in Porsche 911 Bi-Turbo in the Gran Premio Repsol Resistencia Del Jarama, a round of the BRP Global GT series, alongside Pablo de Villota and Fulvio Ballabio. It would be five more years before he reappears, this time at Estoril, racing a Porsche 911 GT2, in a Spanish GT race. De Villota still races, albeit mostly in Spain.[25][26][27][28][29]

After retiring

He currently heads the team and racing school, Emilio de Villota Motorsport. His son Emilio de Villota Jr. has raced in Formula Three and Formula 3000. His daughter María de Villota was a test driver for Marussia F1; a major crash in a test in July 2012 left her with serious injuries; she died in October 2013.

Racing record

Career highlights

Season Series Position Team Car
1975 European Touring Car Championship[30][31] 14th Ford Capri RS 2600
1976 Shellsport G8 International Series[32] 14th Roger Heavens Racing Lyncar-Cosworth 006
1977 Shellsport G8 International Series[33] 5th Emilio de Villota
Iberia F1
Lyncar-Cosworth 006
McLaren-Cosworth M23
1978 Aurora AFX F1 Championship[13][34] 3rd Centro Asegurado F1 McLaren-Cosworth M23
1979 Aurora AFX F1 Championship[14][35] 3rd Madom F1 Team Lotus-Cosworth 78
1980 Aurora AFX F1 Championship[15][36] 1st RAM Racing Williams-Cosworth FW07
Fittipaldi-Cosworth F5A
1981 World Endurance Championship of Drivers[37] 21st Team Lola Lola-Cosworth T600
1982 Deutsche Rennsport Meisterschaft[38] 21st Grid Plaza Grid-Cosworth S1
Camel GT Championship[39] 47th Grid Racing Grid-Cosworth S1
FIA World Endurance Championship of Drivers[40] 117th Grid Racing Grid-Cosworth S1
1983 Campeonato Español de Turismos[41] 1st Ford Capri RS 3000
FIA European Endurance Championship of Drivers[42] 70th Grid Racing Grid-Cosworth S1
1986 FIA World Sports Prototype Championship[43] 12th Danone Porsche España Porsche 956B
1987 Porsche 944 Turbo Cup[44] 8th Porsche 944 Turbo
FIA World Sports Prototype Championship[43] 47th Porsche Kremer Racing Porsche 962C
1993 Spanish Porsche Carrera Cup[25] 1st Porsche 911 Carrera
1995 Spanish Porsche Carrera Cup[25] 1st Porsche 911 Carrera
1996 Spanish Porsche Carrera Cup[25] 1st Porsche 911 Carrera
2011 Spanish Prototype Open Championship – Proto 1[45] 5th Radical España Radical SR3

Complete Formula One World Championship results

(key)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 WDC Pts
1976 RAM Racing Brabham BT44B Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 BRA RSA USW ESP
DNQ
BEL MON SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN USA JPN NC 0
1977 Iberia Airlines McLaren M23 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 ARG BRA RSA USW ESP
13
MON BEL
DNQ
SWE
DNQ
FRA GBR
DNQ
GER
DNQ
AUT
17
NED ITA
DNQ
USA CAN JPN NC 0
1978 Centro Asegurador McLaren M25/M23[N 1] Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 ARG BRA RSA USW MON BEL ESP
DNQ
SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA USA CAN NC 0
1981 Banco Occidental Williams FW07 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 USW BRA ARG SMR BEL MON ESP
EX
FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN CPL NC 0
1982 LBT Team March March 821 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 RSA BRA USW SMR BEL
DNPQ
MON
DNPQ
DET
DNQ
CAN
DNQ
NED
DNPQ
GBR FRA GER AUT SUI ITA CPL NC 0
  1. ^ De Villota originally entered a McLaren M25 in the Spanish Grand Prix, but reverted to the M23 after the M25 got damaged in a practice crash.[46][47][48]

Non-Championship Formula One results

(key)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3
1978 Centro Asegurador McLaren M23 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 INT
Ret
1979 Madom Formula 1 Team Lotus 78 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 ROC
Ret
GNM DIN
1980 Occidental F-1 RAM Williams FW07 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 ESP
Ret

Complete Shellsport International Series results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Pos. Pts
1976 Roger Heavens Racing Lyncar 006 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 MAL
DNS
SNE
5
OUL
Ret
BRH
10
THR BRH
5
MAL
10
SNE
DNS
BRH
18
THR
8
OUL BRH
10
BRH
7
14th 26
1977 Iberia Airlines Lyncar 006 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 MAL
1
SNE
Ret
OUL
DNS
BRH
DNS
MAL THR BRH OUL 5th 76
McLaren M23 MAL
1
DON BRH
1
THR SNE
3
McLaren M25 BRH
Ret

Complete British Formula One Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Pos. Pts
1978 Centro Asegurador F1 McLaren M25 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 OUL
2
BRH
3
SNE
2
MAL
4
ZAN
Ret
DON
5
BRH
Ret
THR
8
SNE
8
3rd 86
Boxer Cars Boxer PR276 Hart 420R 2.0 L4 THR
7
Centro Asegurador F1 McLaren M23 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 OUL
Ret
MAL
4
1979 Madom F1 Team Lotus 78 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 ZOL
Ret
OUL
7
BRH
Ret
MAL
4
SNE
3
THR
1
ZAN
1
DON
2
OUL
1
NOG
1
MAL
6
BRH
Ret
THR
Ret
SNE
8
SIL
Ret
3rd 55
1980 RAM Racing Williams FW07 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 OUL
2
BRH
Ret
SIL
2
MAL
1
MNZ
1
MAL
1
SNE
3
BRH
1
THR
2
OUL
Ret
SIL
1
1st 85
Fittipaldi F5A THR
5

Complete World Sportscar Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Class Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Pos. Pts
1981 Grid Team Lola S
+2.0
Lola T600 Cosworth DFL 3.3 V8 DAY SEB MUG MNZ
Ret
RSD LMS
15
21st 53
Banco Occidental Ultramar Team Lola Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 SIL
Ret
Grid Team Lola NÜR
8
PER
1
DAY
Banco Occidental Ultramar Team Lola Cosworth DFL 3.3 V8 GLN
Ret
SPA MOS ROA BRH
1
1982 Grid Motor Racing C Grid S1 Cosworth DFL 3.3 V8 MNZ
Ret
LMS
Ret
SPA MUG FUJ 117th 1
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 SIL
Ret
NÜR
Cosworth DFL 3.9 V8 BRH
10
1986 John Fitzpatrick Racing C1 Porsche 956B Porsche Type 935/79 2.6 F6t MNZ
10
SIL
5
LMS
4
NOR BRH
DNS
JER
8
NÜR
3
SPA
11
FUJ 13th 34
1987 Porsche Kremer Racing C1 Porsche 962C Porsche Type 935/79 2.8 F6t JAR
10
JER
8
MNZ SIL LMS NOR BRH NÜR SPA FUJ 47th 4

Complete 24 Hours of Le Mans results

Year Team Co-Drivers Car Class Laps Pos. Class
Pos.
1981 United Kingdom Team Lola United Kingdom Guy Edwards
Spain Juan Fernández
Lola T600-Ford Cosworth S
+2.0
287 15th 3rd
1982 United Kingdom Grid Racing South Africa Desiré Wilson
United Kingdom Alain de Cadenet
Grid Plaza S1-Ford Cosworth C 7 DNF DNF
1986 United Kingdom John Fitzpatrick Racing Spain Fermín Velez
South Africa George Fouché
Porsche 956B C1 349 4th 4th
Source:[49]

Complete European Formula Two Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Pos. Pts
1983 James Gresham Racing March 832 BMW SIL
9
THR HOC NÜR VAL PAU NC 0
Minardi Team Srl Minardi M283 JAR
13
DON MIS PER ZOL MUG

References

  1. ^ "Emilio de Villota". ChicaneF1.com. 1946-07-26. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  2. ^ "8W – When? – 1981 Spanish GP". Forix.autosport.com. 1981-01-19. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Emilio de Villota (E) – All Results – Racing Sports Cars
  4. ^ "1975 ETCC – round 6 / Spanish TCC – round 6". Touringcarracing.net. 1975-09-28. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  5. ^ "1976 Shellsport G8 International Series". Silhouet.com. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Emilio de Villota | Racing career profile | Driver Database". Driverdb.com. 1946-07-26. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  7. ^ a b c d e es:Emilio de Villota
  8. ^ "Results – Season – 1976 Spanish Grand Prix". Formula1.com. 1976-05-02. Archived from the original on June 6, 2014. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  9. ^ a b "1977 Shellsport G8 International Series". Silhouet.com. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  10. ^ "Results – Season – 1977 Spanish Grand Prix". Formula1.com. 1977-05-08. Archived from the original on February 10, 2014. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  11. ^ "Results – Season – 1977 Austrian Grand Prix". Formula1.com. 1977-08-14. Archived from the original on February 10, 2014. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  12. ^ "Results – Driver – De Villota, Emilio". Formula1.com. Archived from the original on February 19, 2014. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  13. ^ a b c "Aurora F1 Championship – 1978". Silhouet.com. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  14. ^ a b c "Aurora F1 – 1979". Silhouet.com. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  15. ^ a b c "Aurora F1 – 1980". Silhouet.com. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  16. ^ "Emilio de Villota Profile - Drivers - GP Encyclopedia - F1 History on Grandprix.com". Grandprix.com. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  17. ^ "1981 24 Hours of Le Mans Results and Competitors". Experiencelemans.com. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  18. ^ "6 h Pergusa 1981". Racing Sports Cars. 1981-06-28. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  19. ^ "Brands Hatch 1000 Kilometres 1981 – Race Results". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  20. ^ a b Michael Cotton, "Directory of World Sportscars GROUP C and IMSA Cars from 1982" (Aston Publications, ISBN 0-946627-38-X, 1988)
  21. ^ "Formula 2 1983 – International Trophy". Formula2.net. 2002-02-14. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  22. ^ "Formula 2 1983 – GP de Madrid". Formula2.net. 2002-07-04. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  23. ^ "1985 ETCC – round 2". Touringcarracing.net. 1985-04-21. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  24. ^ "1985 ETCC – round 3". Touringcarracing.net. 1985-05-05. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  25. ^ a b c d Top-Formula.com – Emilio de Villota
  26. ^ "Jarama 4 Hours 1996 – Photo Gallery". Racing Sports Cars. 1996-04-14. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  27. ^ "Spanish GT Estoril 2001 – Entry List". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  28. ^ [1]
  29. ^ "Emilio de Villota: Racedriver biography – career and success". Speedsport-magazine.com. 1946-07-26. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  30. ^ "European Touring Car Championship 1975 standings | Driver Database". Driverdb.com. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  31. ^ "1975 ETCC – round 6 / Spanish TCC – round 6". Touringcarracing.net. 1975-09-28. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  32. ^ "1976 Shellsport G8 International Series". Silhouet.com. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  33. ^ "1977 Shellsport G8 International Series". Silhouet.com. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  34. ^ "Shellsport F1 Series 1978 standings | Driver Database". Driverdb.com. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  35. ^ "Aurora F1 Series 1979 standings | Driver Database". Driverdb.com. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  36. ^ "Aurora F1 Series 1980 standings | Driver Database". Driverdb.com. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  37. ^ "World Championship for Drivers and Makes 1981 standings | Driver Database". Driverdb.com. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  38. ^ "DRM (German Racing Championship) 1982 standings | Driver Database". Driverdb.com. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  39. ^ "IMSA – final positions and tables". Classicscars.com. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  40. ^ "FIA World Endurance Championship 1982 standings | Driver Database". Driverdb.com. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  41. ^ "Spanish Touring Car Championship 1983 standings | Driver Database". Driverdb.com. Archived from the original on 2016-03-07. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  42. ^ "FIA World Endurance Championship 1983 standings | Driver Database". Driverdb.com. Retrieved 2015-12-24.
  43. ^ a b "World Sports-Prototype Championship 1986 standings – Driver Database". Driverdb.com. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  44. ^ "Porsche 944 Turbo Cup 1987 standings – Driver Database". Driverdb.com. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  45. ^ "Spanish Prototype Open Championship – Proto 1 2011 standings – Driver Database". Driverdb.com. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  46. ^ "McLaren M25/1". oldracingcars.com. Retrieved 2017-11-01.
  47. ^ "1978 Spanish Grand Prix". Motorsport. Retrieved 2017-11-01.
  48. ^ "The F5000 McLaren M25". Autosport.com. Retrieved 2017-11-01.
  49. ^ "All Results of Emilio de Villota". racingsportscars.com. Retrieved July 13, 2018.

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Rupert Keegan
British Formula One Champion
1980
Succeeded by
Jim Crawford
(1982)
Preceded by
Jorge de Bagration
Campeonato Español de Turismo
1983
Succeeded by
Francisco Romero
1977 British Grand Prix

The 1977 British Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Silverstone on 16 July 1977. It was the tenth race of the 1977 World Championship of F1 Drivers and the 1977 International Cup for F1 Constructors.

The 68-lap race was won from pole position by local driver James Hunt, driving a McLaren-Ford, with Austrian driver Niki Lauda second in a Ferrari and Swedish driver Gunnar Nilsson third in a Lotus-Ford. The race marked the debut of Canadian driver Gilles Villeneuve, as well as the first outing for the first turbocharged Formula One car, the Renault RS01, driven by Frenchman Jean-Pierre Jabouille. It was also the last race to be given the honorific designation of the European Grand Prix.

1977 Shellsport International Series

The 1977 Shellsport International Series was a Formula Libre motor racing championship held in the United Kingdom, the series ran F1, F2, F5000 and Formula Atlantic cars in the same race. The second Shellsport International Series was contested over 14 rounds. The season started on 13 March and ended on 16 October. The Drivers' Championship was won by Englishman Tony Trimmer. It was the last season of the Shellsport International Series. For 1978, the series would become the British Formula One series.

1978 British Formula One Championship

The 1978 British Formula One Championship (formally the 1978 Aurora AFX F1 Championship) was the first season of the British Formula One Championship. It commenced on 24 March 1978 and ended on 24 September after twelve races.The Aurora AFX F1 Championship replaced the Shellsport Group 8 series that had been run in 1976 and 1977 to Formula Libre rules. As part of the changes, Formula 5000 and Formula Atlantic cars were no longer eligible to race in the Aurora AFX championship. Formula 1 cars were now the focus of the series, with Formula 2 cars still being permitted as a 'B-class'.

1979 British Formula One Championship

The 1979 British Formula One Championship (formally the 1979 Aurora AFX F1 Championship) was the second season of the British Formula One Championship. It commenced on 1 April 1979 and ended on 7 October after fifteen races. The Drivers' Championship was won by Englishman Rupert Keegan who drove an Arrows A1 entered by Charles Clowes.

1980 British Formula One Championship

The 1980 British Formula One Championship (formally the 1980 Aurora AFX F1 Championship) was the third season of the British Formula One Championship. It commenced on 4 April 1980 and ended on 5 October after twelve races. The Drivers' Championship was won by the Spaniard Emilio de Villota who drove a Williams FW07 entered by RAM Racing.

1981 World Sportscar Championship

The 1981 World Sportscar Championship season was the 29th season of FIA World Sportscar Championship motor racing. It featured the 1981 FIA World Endurance Championship which was contested over a fifteen race series which ran from 31 January to 27 September. The former World Challenge for Endurance Drivers was renamed to the World Endurance Championship of Drivers for 1981 and the World Championship of Makes was renamed to the World Endurance Championship of Makes. Bob Garretson won the World Endurance Championship of Drivers and Lancia was awarded the World Endurance Championship of Makes.

1982 Monaco Grand Prix

The 1982 Monaco Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Monaco on 23 May 1982. It was the sixth race of the 1982 FIA Formula One World Championship.

This was the first race following the death of Gilles Villeneuve at the Belgian Grand Prix two weeks previously. Consequently, Ferrari entered only one car, for Didier Pironi.

René Arnoux took pole position in his Renault and led until he spun off at the Swimming Pool on lap 15. Team-mate Alain Prost took over the lead and held it until the closing stages, when rain started to fall. On lap 74, three from the end, Prost pushed too hard and crashed into the Armco barriers coming out of the Chicane du Port (also known as the Dog Leg), handing the lead to Riccardo Patrese in the Brabham. Then, on lap 75, Patrese spun on oil at the Loews hairpin and stalled.

Pironi now led, only for his car to run out of fuel in the tunnel on the final lap. Andrea de Cesaris then ran out of fuel before he could pass Pironi, and Derek Daly, the next leader, had already lost the wings from his Williams after an accident and had also damaged his gearbox, which seized up before he could start the final lap. Patrese, who had managed to restart his car by rolling downhill and bump-starting, came through to take his first Formula One victory, with Pironi, de Cesaris and Daly classified second, third and sixth respectively.

BBC commentator and 1976 world champion James Hunt commented, "Well, we've got this ridiculous situation where we're all sitting by the start-finish line waiting for a winner to come past, and we don't seem to be getting one!"

2002 Porsche Supercup

The 2002 Porsche Michelin Supercup season was the 10th Porsche Supercup season. The races were all supporting races in the 2002 Formula One season. It travelled to 10 circuits across Europe and a double-header at Indianapolis, USA.

2006 F3000 International Masters

The 2006 F3000 International Masters was the second season of what would become the International Formula Master series. The series was won by Czech Jan Charouz for the Charouz Racing System team.

Aleksey Chuklin

Aleksey Chuklin (Russian: Алексе́й Чу́клин, IPA: [ɐlʲɪˈksʲej ˈtɕuklʲɪn], born 11 August 1985) is a Russian racing driver, since 2015 competing under Ukrainian racing license while living in Kiev.

He started his car racing career in the Formula Renault 2.0 NEC, and has also competed in the Eurocup Formula Renault 2.0, the Championnat VdeV, the Formula Renault 2.0 Alps, and the European F3 Open. In 2016, Chuklin finished 3rd in the Championnat VdeV with MP Motorsport. In 2018, Aleksey Chuklin joined NEFIS By Speed Factory team to compete in European Le Mans Series.

Brabham BT44

The Brabham BT44 was a Formula One racing car designed by Gordon Murray, Brabham's chief designer. An update of the partially successful BT42 of 1973, the BT44 was a simple design with a standard Ford DFV/Hewland gearbox combination, but was very clean aerodynamically. Murray had an eye for clean lines, and the BT44 was particularly graceful. He was also a forward thinker, and tinkered with side skirts and airdams on the car, a precursor to ground effects aerodynamics. Sponsorship came from Martini.

The 1974 season was successful for Brabham. Carlos Reutemann took 3 wins with the car, partnered by Carlos Pace who was able to string a series of promising results together. Brabham finished at a fighting fifth place in the Constructor's Championship after a closely fought season.

The BT44 was modified for 1975, and Pace won his first and only Grand Prix at his home event in Brazil, while Reutemann won at the Nürburgring. A series of other strong finishes helped Reutemann to finish third in the drivers' championship in 1975, whilst Brabham equalled his feat in the constructors' championship. Whilst the BT44 was a good car, it couldn't match the McLaren M23 or the Ferrari 312T.

The BT44 was replaced by the Alfa Romeo powered BT45 for 1976 which proved to be a serious step back for the team. The BT44Bs were sold to RAM Racing, who ran them for a variety of drivers in the 1976 World Championship, including Loris Kessel, Emilio de Villota, Patrick Nève, Jac Nellemann, Damien Magee, Lella Lombardi and Bob Evans, none of whom had much success.

De Villota

De Villota is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Emilio de Villota (born 1946), Spanish racing driver

Emilio de Villota Jr. (born 1981), Spanish racing driver

María de Villota (1980−2013), Spanish racing driver

Emilio de Villota Jr.

Emilio de Villota Jr. (born 9 December 1981) is a Spanish racing driver, son of former Aurora champion Emilio de Villota and younger brother of the late María de Villota. He has competed in such series as Euroseries 3000, F3000 International Masters, Porsche Supercup and the Spanish Formula Three Championship.

Formula One drivers from Spain

There have been fifteen Formula One drivers from Spain, the most successful of them being Fernando Alonso who won the World Drivers' Championship twice. Alonso is the only Spanish champion and the only driver from Spain to have won a Grand Prix. Pedro de la Rosa and Alfonso de Portago are the only other Spanish drivers to have stood on the podium, both having finished in second place.

Lyncar

Lyncar was a Formula One constructor from the United Kingdom. They participated in only two grands prix, the 1974 and 1975 British Grands Prix, entering a total of two cars.

Lyncar's founder Martin Slater had built and raced his own cars in junior formulae before becoming a designer for Lola, Brabham and March. In 1971, Slater built a car to enter the British Formula Atlantic Championship, the first of a series of machines which led to the Lyncar 005 with which McLaren engine-builder and amateur racer John Nicholson won the 1973 and 1974 championships.Based upon success in Formula Atlantic, Nicholson commissioned a Formula One chassis from Slater. Nicholson had by then established his own engine building business and was unable to spare the time for a full Grand Prix season. He entered non-championship races and the British Grand Prix in both 1974 and 1975, qualifying for the latter. He was classified 17th (five laps behind) despite crashing in the heavy storm at the end of the race.The car was later updated and entered for Emilio de Villota in the Shellsport International Series, winning a round in 1977 at Mallory Park.

María de Villota

María de Villota Comba (13 January 1980 – 11 October 2013) was a Spanish racing driver. She was the daughter of former Formula One driver Emilio de Villota, and sister of Emilio de Villota Jr., who similarly competed in Formula Palmer Audi. Prior to her death, De Villota was recovering from serious head and facial injuries, sustained during an accident in straight-line testing as the Marussia Formula One team test driver.

McLaren M23

The McLaren M23 was a Formula One racing car designed by Gordon Coppuck, with input from John Barnard, and built by the McLaren team. It was a development of the McLaren M16 Indianapolis 500 car. A Ford Cosworth DFV engine was used, which was prepared by specialist tuning company Nicholson-McLaren Engines. This helped push the DFV's horsepower output to around 490 bhp.

RAM Racing

RAM Racing was a Formula One racing team which competed during the racing seasons of 1976 to 1985. The team entered other manufacturers' chassis from 1976 to 1980, then ran March's team from 1981 to 1983, only entering a car entirely their own in 1984 and 1985.

The team was formed in 1975 by Mike Ralph and John Macdonald, with RAM derived from their names. After running Macdonald in a GRD in British Formula Three, they entered Alan Jones in a Formula 5000 March for 1976. They also bought a pair of Brabham BT44B Formula One cars, and entered the 1976 World Championship, running Loris Kessel and Emilio de Villota for the Spanish Grand Prix, where neither qualified. However, both Kessel and another pay-driver, Patrick Nève, qualified for the Belgian Grand Prix, with Jac Nellemann, Damien Magee, Lella Lombardi and Bob Evans all making appearances in the cars. There were few finishes, and the pay-drivers meant the team were frequent non-qualifiers.

For 1977, Boy Hayje drove a RAM-entered March with little success, and a second "rent-a-car" did no better later in the year when driven by Andy Sutcliffe, Mikko Kozarowitzky or Michael Bleekemolen. However, they had some success running Guy Edwards in the Shellsport Group 8 Championship in Britain, finishing 2nd overall. For 1978 the team switched to the British Aurora Formula One series, with Edwards placing 4th overall that year in a March, and 5th overall the following season in a Fittipaldi F5A. For 1980, RAM made an investment in a pair of 1979-spec Williams FW07s, with Emilio de Villota winning the title. Sponsorship included American men's magazine Penthouse. They then entered one of these cars for Rupert Keegan in the British Grand Prix. Kevin Cogan and Geoff Lees would guest in another car in the last two rounds, but their best finish was Keegan's 9th place at the United States Grand Prix.

1981 saw RAM manage and run the returning March Grand Prix team, with Derek Daly and Eliseo Salazar driving. However, non-qualifications were frequent, and the team failed to score any points, Daly's 7th place at the British Grand Prix being their best result.

The combination stayed together for 1982, landing backing from Rothmans, and the new March 821 saw design work from a young Adrian Reynard. With veteran Jochen Mass to lead the team, backed up by Raul Boesel, hopes were high, but it was another disappointing year. Mass took 7th place at the Detroit Grand Prix, but as the car proved to be slow he lost motivation, and focused more on sports car racing with Porsche. From the German Grand Prix, Keegan took over the car, but RAM March once again failed to score points.

1983 saw the RAM name make itself onto the chassis for the first time, with Dave Kelly's RAM March 01 design. Salazar returned to drive the main entry, while a second car for Jean-Louis Schlesser was fielded at the French Grand Prix as a one-off. Salazar scored a 15th place in the season opener, but the bulky car struggled to qualify. Financial reasons saw the team skip the Detroit Grand Prix, while they only made the Canadian Grand Prix due to fielding local driver Jacques Villeneuve, Sr. and attracting some Canadian sponsorship. Kenny Acheson then took over for the rest of the season, only qualifying once, at the season-closing South African Grand Prix, where he took the team's best result of the year, 12th and last.

Astonishingly, the team pressed on into 1984. The partnership with March was dissolved, and RAM attracted sponsorship from Skoal Bandit. Two RAM 02 cars, with Hart turbo engines, were entered for Formula Two champion Jonathan Palmer and Philippe Alliot. Kelly's new design was disappointing, and the cars were frequent back-markers, and Palmer's 8th place in the opening Brazilian Grand Prix was their best result of the year (and of all time). Indeed, the team drew more notices for the crashes their drivers were involved in.

Alliot remained for 1985, with Manfred Winkelhock entered in the second car, and a new RAM 03 designed by Gustav Brunner. Winkelhock put in some improved qualifying performances, but actual results were still thin. Winkelhock's death in a sports car event in Canada in the summer was a blow to the team, and Acheson was recalled briefly, before the team slimmed down to a single entry. They missed the final two rounds altogether. Skoal withdrew their backing at the end of the year, the team's best result having been Alliot's 9th place, again at the opening Brazilian Grand Prix.

The team planned to enter a single updated RAM 03 for Mike Thackwell (who had stood in for Palmer at the 1984 Canadian Grand Prix) for the 1986 season, but the funds could not be found, and the team folded over the winter of 1985. The team would have raced as car #9 for 1986 otherwise, per the FIA entry list.

Teo Martín Motorsport

Teo Martín Motorsport formerly EV Racing, Emilio de Villota Motorsport, is a Spanish motor racing team, run by Teo Martín and former racing driver Emilio de Villota.

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