Ellen Datlow

Ellen Datlow (born December 31, 1949) is an American science fiction, fantasy, and horror editor and anthologist.

Ellen Datlow, at the Hugo Awards Ceremony, Worldcon, Helsinki
Ellen Datlow in Helsinki, 2017.

Biography

Datlow was the fiction editor of Omni magazine and Omni Online from 1981 through 1998, and edited the ten associated Omni anthologies. She co-edited the Year's Best Fantasy and Horror series from 1988 to 2008 (with co-editor Terri Windling through 2003), followed by the team of Gavin Grant and Kelly Link until the series end[1]) She now edits The Best Horror of the Year published by Night Shade Books. She has edited many original science fiction, fantasy, and horror anthologies on her own, as well as collaborations with Terri Windling, one with Nick Mamatas, and one with Lisa Morton.

She was editor of the webzine Event Horizon: Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror from 1998 through 1999, and was the editor of Sci Fiction until it ceased publication with its last piece of fiction, December 28, 2005. She currently is consulting editor for "Tor.com."

Datlow won the Hugo Award for Best Professional Editor in 2002 and 2005, and the Hugo for Best Short Form Editor in 2009, 2010, 2012, 2014, 2016, and 2017. Her editing work has also been recognized with five Bram Stoker Awards, ten World Fantasy Awards,[2] two International Horror Guild Awards for Best Anthology, three Shirley Jackson Awards for Best anthology, twelve Locus Awards for Best Editor. She was named recipient of the 2007 Karl Edward Wagner Award, given at the British Fantasy Convention for "outstanding contribution to the genre." In 2011 she was given the Life Achievement Award by the Horror Writers Association.[3] She is a long time trustee of the Horror Writers Association. She has been the co-host of the Fantastic Fiction reading series at the KGB Bar since 2000, a series which features luminaries and up-and-comers in speculative fiction.

The Best Horror of the Year is an annual compendium of the critically acclaimed editor's selections of horror fiction and poetry published in the previous year and has included fiction by Laird Barron, Stephen Graham Jones, Michael Marshall Smith, Joe R. Lansdale and Nicholas Royle. The books also contains an annual summation of publishing in the field (Awards, Notable Novels, Anthologies, Single-Author Collections, Journals/Newsletters/Magazines/Webzines, Poetry, Non-Fiction, Chapbooks/Limited Editions) and a list of "Honorable Mentions." Volume Ten was published in June 2018. The Best of the Best Horror of the Year: Ten Years of Essential Horror Fiction was published in 2018.

She has also edited the anthologies Nebula Awards Showcase 2009 (2009), Darkness: Two Decades of Horror (2010), Hauntings (2013), Lovecraft's Monsters (2014), The Cutting Room (2014), The Monstrous (2015), and Nightmares (2016) for Tachyon Publications. Queen Victoria's Book of Spells an anthology edited by Datlow and Terri Windling, was published by Tor Books in 2013,[4][5] followed by The Doll Collection (2016) Mad Hatters and March Hares (2017) and The Devil and the Deep (2018).

Datlow won the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement in 2014. [6]

Awards

References

  1. ^ Gavin Grant announces the end of Year's Best Fantasy and Horror: http://smallbeerpress.com/not-a-journal/2009/01/12/the-years-best-fantasy-horror/
  2. ^ World Fantasy Convention (2010). "Award Winners and Nominees". Archived from the original on 2010-12-01. Retrieved 4 Feb 2011.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-08-14. Retrieved 2011-08-20.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ Queen Victoria's Book of Spells cover art, anthology incl Genevieve Valentine and Catherynne M Valente: "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-07-24. Retrieved 2012-07-22.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ DeNardo, John (March 2, 2012). "TOC: 'Queen Victoria's Book of Spells' Edited by Ellen Datlow & Terri Windling". SF Signal. Retrieved August 30, 2012. Ellen Datlow has posted the table of contents for the upcoming anthology...
  6. ^ Ansible 325 August 2014. "Ellen Datlow and Chelsea Quinn Yarbro are the two winners of the World Fantasy Award life achievement honour for 2014."

External links

Bram Stoker Award for Best Anthology

The Bram Stoker Award for Best Anthology is an award presented by the Horror Writers Association (HWA) for "superior achievement" in horror writing for an anthology.

Garth Nix

Garth Richard Nix (born 19 July 1963) is an Australian writer who specialises in children's and young adult fantasy novels, notably the Old Kingdom, Seventh Tower and Keys to the Kingdom series. He has frequently been asked if his name is a pseudonym, to which he has responded, "I guess people ask me because it sounds like the perfect name for a writer of fantasy. However, it is my real name."

Gavin Grant (editor)

Gavin J. Grant is a science fiction editor and writer. He runs Small Beer Press along with his wife Kelly Link. In addition, he has been the editor of Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet since 1996 and, from 2003 to 2008, was co-editor of the Year's Best Fantasy and Horror anthology series along with Link and Ellen Datlow. Their 2004 anthology was awarded the Bram Stoker Award for best horror anthology.He moved to the United States from Scotland in 1991. He is married to Kelly Link and lives with her in Northampton, Massachusetts.

Hugo Award for Best Professional Editor

The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Professional Editor is given each year for editors of magazines, novels, anthologies, or other works related to science fiction or fantasy. The award supplanted a previous award for professional magazine.

The award was first presented in 1973, and was given annually through 2006. Beginning in 2007, the award was split into two categories, that of Best Editor (Short Form) and Best Editor (Long Form). The Short Form award is for editors of anthologies, collections or magazines, while the Long Form award is for editors of novels. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for years 50, 75, or 100 years prior in which no awards were given. To date, Retro Hugo awards have been awarded for 1939, 1941, 1943, 1946, 1951, and 1954, and in each case an award for professional editor was given.Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by supporting or attending members of the annual World Science Fiction Convention, or Worldcon, and the presentation evening constitutes its central event. The selection process is defined in the World Science Fiction Society Constitution as instant-runoff voting with six nominees, except in the case of a tie. The works on the ballot are the six most-nominated by members that year, with no limit on the number of works that can be nominated. Initial nominations are made by members in January through March, while voting on the ballot of six nominations is performed roughly in April through July, subject to change depending on when that year's Worldcon is held. Prior to 2017, the final ballot was five works; it was changed that year to six, with each initial nominator limited to five nominations. Worldcons are generally held near Labor Day, and are held in a different city around the world each year. Members are permitted to vote "no award", if they feel that none of the nominees is deserving of the award that year, and in the case that "no award" takes the majority the Hugo is not given in that category. This happened in both the Short Form and Long Form categories in 2015.During the 54 nomination years, 70 editors have been nominated for the original Best Professional Editor, the Short Form, or the Long Form award, including Retro Hugos. Of these, Gardner Dozois has received the most awards, with 15 original awards out of 19 nominations for the original category and 2 for the Short Form. The only other editors to win more than three awards are Ben Bova, who won 6 of 8 nominations for the original award, Ellen Datlow, who won 7 of 17 nominations, split between the original and short form awards, and John W. Campbell, Jr. with 6 out of 7 nominations for the Retro Hugo awards. The two editors who have won three times are Edward L. Ferman with 3 out of 20 original nominations and Patrick Nielsen Hayden with 3 out of 3 Long Form nominations. Stanley Schmidt has received the most nominations, at 27 original and 7 Short Form, winning one Short Form.

James Frenkel

James Raymond Frenkel (born 1948) is an American editor and agent of science fiction, fantasy, mysteries, thrillers, historical fiction, and other books, formerly for Tom Doherty Associates (Tor Books and Forge Books). He has edited numerous prominent authors such as Vernor Vinge, Joan D. Vinge, Frederik Pohl, Andre Norton, Loren D. Estleman, Dan Simmons, Jack Williamson, Timothy Zahn, Marie Jakober and Greg Bear. His agency clients include John C. Wright and L. Jagi Lamplighter. He and his wife, author Joan D. Vinge lived in Madison, Wisconsin for many years, but have moved to Green Valley, Arizona.

In 1968, Frenkel founded The Science Fiction Forum at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, a student-run organization which continues to operate a large lending library of science fiction, fantasy, and horror books. He was the publisher of Bluejay Books, an independent trade publisher of the mid-1980s. Bluejay Books published Gardner Dozois's The Year's Best Science Fiction for three years. He also was the packager of The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror series edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling (for sixteen years) and then Ellen Datlow and Kelly Link & Gavin J. Grant (for five years).

In July 2013, Frenkel left Tor after two complaints about harassment at WisCon, a feminist science fiction convention where he had been a regular attendee and presenter. Frenkel was subsequently permanently banned from attending the convention. However, in 2017, he was on the convention committee of Odyssey Con, a different science fiction convention also held in Madison, and scheduled as a presenter, prompting several authors (one of whom claimed to have had unpleasant experiences with Frenkel in the past), to withdraw from the convention.

Match Girl (short story)

"Match Girl" (1995) is a short story by Anne Bishop, published in Ruby Slippers, Golden Tears (edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling. It is a retelling of the story of "The Little Match Girl" by Hans Christian Andersen.

Mythic fiction

Mythic fiction is literature that is rooted in, inspired by, or that in some way draws from the tropes, themes and symbolism of myth, legend, folklore, and fairy tales. The term is widely credited to Charles de Lint and Terri Windling. Mythic fiction overlaps with urban fantasy and the terms are sometimes used interchangeably, but mythic fiction also includes contemporary works in non-urban settings. Mythic fiction refers to works of contemporary literature that often cross the divide between literary and fantasy fiction.Windling promoted mythic fiction as the co-editor (with Ellen Datlow) of The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror annual volumes for sixteen years, and as the editor of the Endicott Studio Journal of Mythic Arts.

Though mythic fiction can be loosely based in mythology, it frequently uses familiar mythological personages archetypes (such as tricksters, or the thunderer). This is in contrast to mythopoeia, such as the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, which invent their own legends and folklore or construct entirely new pantheons.

A suggested mythic fiction reading list can be found at the Endicott Studio website: Mythic fiction Reading List.

Off Limits (anthology)

Off Limits (1997, ISBN 978-0-441-00436-2) is a science fiction anthology edited by Ellen Datlow. It was published in 1997 by Ace Books. It includes four previously published stories and 14 new ones.

Pat Cadigan

Pat Cadigan (born September 10, 1953) is an American science fiction author, whose work is most often identified with the cyberpunk movement. Her novels and short stories all share a common theme of exploring the relationship between the human mind and technology.

Readercon

Readercon is an annual science fiction convention, held every July in the Boston, Massachusetts area, in Burlington, Massachusetts. It was founded by Bob Colby and statistician Eric Van in the mid-1980s with the goal of focusing almost exclusively on science fiction/fantasy/slipstream/speculative fiction in the written form (on the rare occasion that there is a discussion held about non-written science fiction, it will have a tongue-in-cheek title such as "Our biannual media panel"). Past guests of honor have included authors such as Greer Gilman, Gene Wolfe, Octavia Butler, Samuel R. Delany, Karen Joy Fowler, Brian Aldiss, Nalo Hopkinson, Joe Haldeman, Caitlín R. Kiernan, Peter Straub, and China Miéville, and editors such as Ellen Datlow and David G. Hartwell. The convention also makes a point of honoring a deceased author as the Memorial Guest of Honor. In 2009, for instance, the guests of honor were the living writers Elizabeth Hand and Greer Gilman and the memorial guest of honor was Hope Mirrlees.Total attendance at the convention has been consistently around 850 for many years.From 2005 to 2011, Readercon was the official venue for presentation of the Rhysling Award. It has hosted the Shirley Jackson Awards since their founding in 2007.

Ruby Slippers, Golden Tears

Ruby Slippers, Golden Tears is the third book in a series of collections of re-told fairy tales edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling.

Salon Fantastique

Salon Fantastique: Fifteen Original Tales of Fantasy is a fantasy short story anthology edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling.

Snow White, Blood Red (book)

Snow White, Blood Red is the first book in a series of collections of re-told fairy tales edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling.

Tachyon Publications

Tachyon Publications is an independent press specializing in science fiction and fantasy books. Founded in San Francisco in 1995 by Jacob Weisman, Tachyon books have tended toward high-end literary works, short story collections, and anthologies.

In 2013, Tachyon's publication After the Fall, Before the Fall, During the Fall by Nancy Kress won the Nebula Award and Locus Award for best novella. Also in 2013, Tachyon's publication of The Emperor's Soul by Brandon Sanderson won the Hugo Award for best novella.From 1992-1994, Weisman also published Thirteenth Moon magazine, which featured short stories, poetry and essays by authors including Vicki Aron, Michael Astrov, M.J. Atkins, Simon Baker, Michael Bishop, Fred Branfman, Lela E. Buis, Paul Di Filippo, Linda Dunn, Alma Garcia, Lisa Goldstein, Brice Gorman, John Grey, Eva Hauser, Deborah Hunt, Knute Johnson, Lewis Jordan, Ursula K. Le Guin, Mary Soon Lee, Pamela Lovell, David Nemec, Lyn Nichols, Robert Patrick, David Sandner, Brian Skinner, Lia Smith, P. Stillman, Rob Sullivan, Pat Toomay, Inti Valverde, Peter Weverka and Wayne Wightman.

Terri Windling

Terri Windling (born December 3, 1958 in Fort Dix, New Jersey) is an American editor, artist, essayist, and the author of books for both children and adults. Windling has won nine World Fantasy Awards, the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award, the Bram Stoker Award, and her collection The Armless Maiden appeared on the short-list for the James Tiptree, Jr. Award. She received the Solstice Award in 2010, which honors "individuals with a significant impact on the speculative fiction field." Windling's work has been translated into French, German, Spanish, Italian, Czech, Lithuanian, Turkish, Russian, Japanese, and Korean.

In the American publishing field, Windling is one of the primary creative forces behind the mythic fiction resurgence that began in the early 1980s—first through her work as an innovative editor for the Ace and Tor Books fantasy lines; secondly as the creator of the 'Fairy Tales' series of novels (featuring reinterpretations of classic fairy tale themes by Jane Yolen, Steven Brust, Pamela Dean, Patricia C. Wrede, Charles de Lint, and others); and thirdly as the editor of over thirty anthologies of magical fiction. She is also recognized as one of the founders of the urban fantasy genre, having published and promoted the first novels of Charles de Lint, Emma Bull, and other pioneers of the form.With Ellen Datlow, Windling edited 16 volumes of Year's Best Fantasy and Horror (1986–2003), an anthology that reached beyond the boundaries of genre fantasy to incorporate magic realism, surrealism, poetry, and other forms of magical literature. Datlow and Windling also edited the Snow White, Blood Red series of literary fairy tales for adult readers, as well as many anthologies of myth & fairy tale inspired fiction for younger readers (such as The Green Man, The Faery Reel, and The Wolf at the Door). Windling also created and edited the Borderland series for teenage readers, and The Armless Maiden, a fiction collection for adult survivors of child abuse like herself.As an author, Windling's fiction includes The Wood Wife (winner of the Mythopoeic Award for Novel of the Year) and several children's books: The Raven Queen, The Changeling, A Midsummer Night's Faery Tale, The Winter Child, and The Faeries of Spring Cottage. Her essays on myth, folklore, magical literature and art have been widely published in newsstand magazines, academic journals, art books, and anthologies. She was a contributor to The Oxford Companion to Fairy Tales, edited by Jack Zipes.

As an artist, Windling specializes in work inspired by myth, folklore, and fairy tales. Her art has been exhibited across the US, as well as in the UK and France.

Windling is the founder of the Endicott Studio, an organization dedicated to myth-inspired arts, and was the co-editor (with Midori Snyder) of The Journal of Mythic Arts from 1987 until it ceased publication in 2008. She also sits on the board of the Mythic Imagination Institute. Windling married Howard Gayton, the British dramatist and co-founder of the influential Commedia dell'arte troupe, the Ophaboom Theatre Company, in September 2008, and lives in Devon, England.In May 2016, Windling gave the fourth annual Tolkien Lecture at Pembroke College, Oxford, speaking on the topic of fantasy literature in the post-Tolkien era.

The Best Horror of the Year

The Best Horror of the Year is a series of horror fiction anthologies edited by Ellen Datlow. The series is published by Night Shade Books.

The format of the series is a collection of horror stories that vary in topic, contributed by multiple authors. A new volume has been released yearly since 2009.

World Fantasy Award—Anthology

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction published in English during the previous calendar year. The awards have been described by book critics such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and one of the three most prestigious speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Award—Anthology is given each year for anthologies of fantasy stories by multiple authors published in English. An anthology can have any number of editors, and works in the anthology may have been previously published; awards are also given out for collections of works by a single author in the Collection category. The Anthology category has been awarded annually since 1988, though from 1977 through 1987 anthologies were admissible as nominees in the Collection category. During the ten years they were admissible for that category they won the award seven times and represented 38 of the 56 nominations.World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Winners were presented with a statue in the form of a bust of H. P. Lovecraft through the 2015 awards; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 31 nomination years, 114 editors have had works nominated; 36 of them have won, including co-editors. Only four editors have won more than once. Ellen Datlow has won 8 times out of 34 nominations, the most of any editor; Terri Windling has won 6 times out of 18 nominations, all of the nominations as a co-editor with Datlow; Jack Dann has won twice out of five nominations; and Dennis Etchison has won twice out of 3 nominations. After Datlow and Windling, the editors with the most nominations are Stephen Jones, who has won once out of fourteen nominations, Gardner Dozois, who has won once out of six nominations, and David Sutton and Martin H. Greenberg, who each have been nominated six times without winning. Fifteen editors in total have been nominated more than twice.

World Fantasy Special Award—Professional

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction and art published in English during the preceding calendar year. The awards have been described by sources such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and one of the three most renowned speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Special Award—Professional is given each year to individuals for their professional work in the preceding calendar year in fields related to fantasy that is not covered by other World Fantasy Award categories. These have included editors of magazines and novels, publishers, and authors of non-fiction works. Occasionally, especially in the first few years of the award, some publishing companies were nominated along with individual editors and publishers. The nomination reasons were not specified in the first year of the award, and have sometimes not been specified beyond "contributions to the genre". Individuals are also eligible for the Special Award—Non-professional category for their non-professional work. The World Fantasy Special Award—Professional has been awarded annually since 1975.World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Winners were presented with a statue in the form of a bust of H. P. Lovecraft through the 2015 awards; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 44 nomination years, 145 individuals and four publishing companies have been nominated; 53 people have won, including ties and co-nominees. For his work at Donald M. Grant, Publisher Donald M. Grant has won three times out of eight nominations, and six other nominees have won twice. Ian Ballantine and Betty Ballantine have won twice out of two nominations each for their non-fiction and publishing work, and Peter Crowther twice out of four nominations for his work at PS Publishing. Edward L. Ferman won twice out of six nominations for his work at The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Stephen Jones twice out of six for his editing and anthology work, and Gordon Van Gelder twice out of seven nominations for his editing work in both books and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Ellen Datlow has received the most nominations with ten, winning once, for her editing and anthology work, and David Pringle has the most nominations without winning with five, for his work at Interzone and for "contributions to the genre".

Year's Best Fantasy and Horror

Year's Best Fantasy and Horror was a reprint anthology published annually by St. Martin's Press from 1987 to 2008. In addition to the short stories, supplemented by a list of honorable mentions, each edition included a number of retrospective essays by the editors and others. The first two anthologies were originally published under the name The Year's Best Fantasy before the title was changed beginning with the third book.

For most of its run, the series was edited by Terri Windling and Ellen Datlow, with Windling primarily responsible for the "fantasy" portion of the content and Datlow for the "horror" portion. From the 16th edition (covering works first published in 2003), Windling's role was taken by the team of Kelly Link and Gavin Grant. The cover art for every edition was done by Thomas Canty. In 2009, it was announced that there would be no 2009 edition. Ellen Datlow is now editing The Best Horror of the Year published by Night Shade Books.

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