Ellen Asher

Ellen Asher is an American science fiction editor who served as editor-in-chief of the Science Fiction Book Club (SFBC) for thirty-four years, from February 8, 1973, through June 1, 2007.[1] She grew up in New York City and began editing science fiction at New American Library from 1970 to 1972.[2][3]

As editor-in-chief of the SFBC, she oversaw the publication of anthologies like The Dragon Quintet, Vampire Sextet, Fair Folk, and Masterpieces of Terror and the Supernatural.[4] In 1984, Asher sat as a judge for the World Fantasy Awards.[5] In 2001, Asher received the New England Science Fiction Association Edward E. Smith Memorial Award.[6] In early 2007, the multinational media corporation, Bertelsmann, bought a controlling portion of Bookspan, of which the SFBC is an affiliate.[7] In the subsequent restructuring, Asher was given an early retirement.[8]

Asher received the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement in 2009 and was a guest of honor at Renovation, the 69th World Science Fiction Convention.[9] She occasionally performs some freelance work.[4]

Ellen Asher
EllenAsher
OccupationEditor
Notable awardsEdward E. Smith Memorial Award for Imaginative Fiction, 2001
World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement, 2009

References

  1. ^ Strock, Ian (2007-07-22). "Ellen Asher Leaving Science Fiction Book Club". Archived from the original on 2011-07-21. Retrieved 2011-04-26.
  2. ^ "Readercon 20 Program Guide" (PDF). Readercon. p. 41. Retrieved 2011-04-26.
  3. ^ Asher, Ellen (2009-04-07). Datlow, Ellen (ed.). Clubbing. Penguin Books. p. 301. ISBN 978-0-451-46255-8.
  4. ^ a b "Guest of Honor - Ellen Asher". Renovation. Archived from the original on 2011-04-07. Retrieved 2011-04-26.
  5. ^ "1984 World Fantasy Awards". Locus. Archived from the original on 2013-09-20. Retrieved 2011-04-26.
  6. ^ "The E. E. Smith Memorial Award". New England Science Fiction Association. Retrieved 2011-04-26.
  7. ^ Strock, Ian (2007-04-11). "Bertelsmann buys TimeWarner's half of Bookspan". Archived from the original on 2010-12-21. Retrieved 2011-04-26.
  8. ^ Strock, Ian (2007-05-22). "Bertelsmann cutting book clubs and jobs; SFBC may be affected". Archived from the original on 2010-12-21. Retrieved 2011-04-26.
  9. ^ "Award Winners & Nominees". World Fantasy Convention. Archived from the original on 2013-10-15. Retrieved 2011-04-26.
69th World Science Fiction Convention

The 69th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as Renovation, was held in Reno, Nevada, August 17–21, 2011, at the Reno-Sparks Convention Center (RSCC). The Atlantis Casino Resort served as the headquarters/party hotel, with additional rooms supplied by the Peppermill Reno and Courtyard by Marriott. The convention committee was chaired by Patty Wells.

Edward E. Smith Memorial Award

The Edward E. Smith Memorial Award for Imaginative Fiction, or "Skylark", annually recognizes someone for lifetime contributions to science fiction, "both through work in the field and by exemplifying the personal qualities which made the late "Doc" Smith well-loved by those who knew him." It is presented by the New England Science Fiction Association at its annual convention, Boskone, to someone chosen by a vote of NESFA members. The trophy is a large lens mounted on a simple plinth.The award was inaugurated in 1966, the year after Smith's death. Fifty-one people have been honored in 49 years to 2015 (Hal Clement received the award twice, in 1969 and 1997).

Skylark recipients

List of Worldcon Guests of Honor

This is a list of people who have been official Guests of Honor at the World Science Fiction Convention, since the first Worldcon in 1939.

Each Worldcon committee selects the Guests of Honor (often just "GoH" in publications) for the convention. Typical categories are Author (or "Writer" or just "Pro"), Fan, Artist, Editor and Media, (though some Worldcon GoH slates are not categorised, reflecting that some honorees have contributed in more than one aspect of the genre and that the honor is equal across all those selected). While other conventions may select guests on the basis of popularity, Worldcons usually select Guests of Honor as an acknowledgement of significant lifetime contribution to the field; typically at least 25 years of activity. Selection as a Worldcon GoH is treated by authors, fans, and others in the SF field as a lifetime achievement award.

List of Worldcons

This World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) list includes prior and scheduled Worldcons. The data is maintained by the Long List Committee, a World Science Fiction Society sub-committee.

Notes:

Name – a convention is normally listed by the least confusing version of its name. This is usually the name preferred by the convention, but fannish tradition is followed in retroactively numbering the first Worldcon in a series 1 (or I or One).

Guests of honor – custom in designating guests of honor has varied greatly, with some conventions giving specific titles (Fan, Pro, Australia, U.S., Artist, etc.) and some simply call them all guests of honor. Specific labels have been used where they existed, as have regional variants in spelling.

Size – where available, this column records two numbers: how many paying members attended the Worldcon and how many total members there were (in parentheses). The available data is very incomplete and imprecise and many of these numbers are probably substantially in error.1942–1945: Worldcon not held due to World War II

List of science fiction editors

This is a list of science fiction editors, editors working for book and magazine publishing companies who have edited science fiction. Many have also edited works of fantasy and other related genres, all of which have been sometimes grouped under the name speculative fiction.

Editors on this list should fulfill the conditions for Notability for creative professionals in science fiction or related genres. Evidence for notability includes an existing wiki-biography, or evidence that one could be written. Borderline cases should be discussed on the article's talk page.

OryCon

Orycon is Portland, Oregon's annual science fiction/fantasy convention, held in November since 1979.

World Fantasy Award—Life Achievement

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction and fantasy art published in English during the preceding calendar year. The awards have been described by sources such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and as one of the three most renowned speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Award—Life Achievement is given each year to individuals for their overall career in fields related to fantasy. These have included, for example, authors, editors, and publishers. The specific nomination reasons are not given, and nominees are not required to have retired, though they can only win once. The Life Achievement category has been awarded annually since 1975.World Fantasy Award nominees are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner of each category. Unlike the other World Fantasy Award categories, the nominees for the Life Achievement award are not announced; instead, the winner is announced along with the nominees in the other categories. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors, and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Through 2015, winners were presented with a statuette of H. P. Lovecraft; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 44 nomination years, 69 people have been given the Life Achievement Award. Multiple winners have been awarded 21 times, typically two co-winners, though five were noted in 1984. Since 2000 it has become an unofficial tradition for two winners to be announced, often with one winner primarily an author and the other not. While most winners have been authors and editors, five winners have been primarily artists of fantasy art and book covers, and four winners are best known for founding or running publishing houses that produce fantasy works.

World Fantasy Convention

The World Fantasy Convention is an annual convention of professionals, collectors, and others interested in the field of fantasy. The World Fantasy Awards are presented at the event. Other features include an art show, a dealer's room, and an autograph reception.The convention was conceived and begun by T. E. D. Klein, Kirby McCauley and several others.

World Fantasy Special Award—Professional

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction and art published in English during the preceding calendar year. The awards have been described by sources such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and one of the three most renowned speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Special Award—Professional is given each year to individuals for their professional work in the preceding calendar year in fields related to fantasy that is not covered by other World Fantasy Award categories. These have included editors of magazines and novels, publishers, and authors of non-fiction works. Occasionally, especially in the first few years of the award, some publishing companies were nominated along with individual editors and publishers. The nomination reasons were not specified in the first year of the award, and have sometimes not been specified beyond "contributions to the genre". Individuals are also eligible for the Special Award—Non-professional category for their non-professional work. The World Fantasy Special Award—Professional has been awarded annually since 1975.World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Winners were presented with a statue in the form of a bust of H. P. Lovecraft through the 2015 awards; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 44 nomination years, 145 individuals and four publishing companies have been nominated; 53 people have won, including ties and co-nominees. For his work at Donald M. Grant, Publisher Donald M. Grant has won three times out of eight nominations, and six other nominees have won twice. Ian Ballantine and Betty Ballantine have won twice out of two nominations each for their non-fiction and publishing work, and Peter Crowther twice out of four nominations for his work at PS Publishing. Edward L. Ferman won twice out of six nominations for his work at The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Stephen Jones twice out of six for his editing and anthology work, and Gordon Van Gelder twice out of seven nominations for his editing work in both books and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Ellen Datlow has received the most nominations with ten, winning once, for her editing and anthology work, and David Pringle has the most nominations without winning with five, for his work at Interzone and for "contributions to the genre".

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