El Viaje Misterioso de Nuestro Jomer (The Mysterious Voyage of Homer)

"El Viaje Misterioso de Nuestro Jomer (The Mysterious Voyage of Homer)", (Spanish pronunciation: [el ˈβjaxe misteɾˈjoso ðe ˈnwestɾo ˈxomeɾ]) also known as "The Mysterious Voyage of Our Homer",[2] is the ninth episode in the eighth season of the American animated television series The Simpsons. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on January 5, 1997.[3] In the episode, Homer eats several hot chili peppers and hallucinates, causing him to go on a mysterious voyage. Following this, he questions his relationship with Marge and goes on a journey to find his soulmate.

"El Viaje Misterioso de Nuestro Jomer (The Mysterious Voyage of Homer)" was written by Ken Keeler and directed by Jim Reardon.[3] The episode explores themes of marriage, community, and alcohol use.[4] Homer's voyage features surreal animation to depict the elaborate hallucination. The episode guest stars Johnny Cash as the "Space Coyote".[1]

"El Viaje Misterioso de Nuestro Jomer (The Mysterious Voyage of Homer)"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no.Season 8
Episode 9 (162nd overall)
Directed byJim Reardon
Written byKen Keeler
Production code3F24
Original air dateJanuary 5, 1997
Guest appearance(s)

Johnny Cash as the Space Coyote

Episode features
Couch gagThe family parachutes to the couch; Homer's parachute fails sending him plummeting.[1]
CommentaryMatt Groening
Josh Weinstein
Jim Reardon
George Meyer

Plot

On a particular weekend, Marge tries to divert the attention of Homer in strange ways, like cutting certain things out of the morning newspaper and smoking in the house. Upon stepping outside, Homer smells the scents of Springfield's annual chili cook-off. Marge admits to trying to keep Homer from attending due to his drunken antics the previous year, but lets him go as long as he promises to not drink beer. At the cook-off, Homer demonstrates an extraordinary ability to withstand hot foods, but is burned by Chief Wiggum's super-hot chili and runs away screaming as the town folks laugh. Sitting at a table with Ralph Wiggum quenching the heat with water, he nearly drinks melted candle wax. When Ralph points this out, he gets the idea to use the wax to coat his mouth, enabling him to eat several of Chief Wiggum's peppers.

After winning the chili eating contest, the peppers make Homer hallucinate. In a bizarre fantasy world, he encounters a snake, a butterfly and a tortoise, as well as accidentally destroying the sun. He arrives at a large Mayan pyramid and meets his spirit guide in the form of a coyote, who advises him to find his soulmate and questions Homer's assumption that Marge is his. Meanwhile, Marge hears of Homer's strange behavior and believing this was due to drinking alcohol, drives home without him.

The next day, Homer awakes in a golf course. Returning home, he finds Marge angry with him for his embarrassing behavior at the cook-off and asks for forgiveness, but she refuses. Homer makes note of the two's fundamental personality differences and questions if she is truly his soulmate. While roaming the streets at night, he thinks a lonely lighthouse keeper is his soulmate, but finds the lighthouse is operated by a machine. Seeing an approaching ship, Homer destroys the lighthouse's light hoping its passengers will stop and befriend him. An apologetic Marge arrives, having known exactly where Homer would go, and the pair realize they really are soulmates despite their differences. Marge fixes the light so the ship does not run into them, but it runs aground nearby, spilling its cargo of hotpants. Springfield's citizens happily retrieve them as Marge and Homer embrace. [3]

Production

3dsimpsonsbutterfly
The butterfly in Homer's hallucination was created using 3D computer animation.

The episode was pitched as early as the third season by George Meyer, who was interested in an episode based on the books of Carlos Castaneda.[5] Meyer had wanted to have an episode featuring a mystical voyage that was not induced by drugs, and so he decided to use "really hot" chili peppers instead.[5] The staff, except for Matt Groening, felt it was too odd for the show at that point.[6] Bill Oakley and Josh Weinstein resurrected the story, and decided to use it for season eight.[5]

Most of the hallucination sequence was animated completely by David Silverman. Silverman did not want the risk of sending it to South Korea, as he wanted it to look exactly as he had imagined it, including rendered backgrounds to give a soft mystical feel to the scene.[7] The coyote was intentionally drawn in a boxier way so that it looked "other-worldly" and unlike the other characters.[8] During Homer's voyage, the clouds in one shot are live-action footage, and 3D computer animation was used for the giant butterfly.[2] During the same hallucination, Ned Flanders' line was treated on a Mac computer so that it increased and decreased pitch.[2] The Fox censors sent a note to the writers, questioning Homer coating his mouth with hot wax. The note read: "To discourage imitation by young and foolish viewers, when Homer begins to pour hot wax into his mouth, please have him scream in pain so kids will understand that doing this would actually burn their mouths."[9] The scream was not added; however, they did add dialog from Ralph Wiggum, questioning Homer on his action. The director also created a "wax-chart" for Homer for the animators to follow during the sequence when Homer's mouth is coated with candle-wax.[6]

Homer waking up on a golf course was a reference to something that happened to a friend of the producers, who blacked out, and woke up on a golf course. He had to buy a map from 7-Eleven in order to find out where he was. He discovered that not only was he in a different town, but he was also in a different state. He then had to walk several miles in order to get back to his friend's house, which was the last place he remembered being the night before.[2]

Casting

Johnny Cash and Bob Dylan were the writers' top two choices to play the coyote; the writers had wanted to use one of The Highwaymen as the voice of the spirit guide.[2] Dylan had turned the show down many times, having previously been offered a role in the season seven episode "Homerpalooza".[10] Cash was offered the role, which he accepted. Matt Groening described Cash's appearance as "one of the greatest coups the show has ever had".[6]

Cultural references

The main plot of the episode is based on the works of Carlos Castaneda,[5] with some of the Native American imagery being similar to that used in the film Dances with Wolves.[1] The lighthouse keeper actually being a computer is a reference to the episode of The Twilight Zone called "The Old Man in the Cave", in which a man in a cave turns out to be a computer.[3] The main theme from The Good, the Bad and the Ugly is used during the scenes when Homer walks into the chili festival,[3] and the song "At Seventeen" by Janis Ian plays in the background as Homer walks through the town of Springfield looking for his soul-mate after he wakes up from his vision.[2] The scene at the end of Homer's hallucination, when the train is heading towards him, is a reference to the opening titles of Soul Train.[2] Homer's record collection features albums by Jim Nabors, Glen Campbell, and The Doodletown Pipers.[1]

Reception

In its original broadcast, "El Viaje Misterioso de Nuestro Jomer (The Mysterious Voyage of Homer)" finished 34th in ratings for the week of December 30, 1996 – January 5, 1997, with a Nielsen rating of 9.0, equivalent to approximately 8.7 million viewing households. It was the highest-rated show on the Fox network that week.[11]

The authors of the book I Can't Believe It's a Bigger and Better Updated Unofficial Simpsons Guide, Warren Martyn and Adrian Wood, said: "Homer's chili-induced trip is brilliant, complete with the surreal tortoise and Indian spirit guide."[1]

The episode was placed eighth on AskMen.com's "Top 10: Simpsons Episodes" list,[12] and in his book Planet Simpson, Chris Turner named the episode as being one of his five favorites, although he found the ending too sentimental.[9]

In 2011, Keith Plocek of LA Weekly's Squid Ink blog listed "El Viaje Misterioso de Nuestro Jomer (The Mysterious Voyage of Homer)" as the best episode of the show with a food theme.[13]

IGN ranked Johnny Cash's performance as the 14th-best guest appearance in the show's history.[14] Cash also appeared on AOL's list of their 25 favorite The Simpsons guest stars,[15] and on The Times' Simon Crerar's list of the 33 funniest cameos in the history of the show.[16] Andrew Martin of Prefix Mag named Cash his third-favorite musical guest on The Simpsons out of a list of ten.[17]

Fred Topel of Crave Online named it the best episode of the entire series.[18]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Martyn, Warren; Wood, Adrian (2000). "El Viaje Misterioso del Nuestro Jomer (The". BBC. Retrieved March 26, 2007.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Weinstein, Josh (2006). The Simpsons The Complete Eighth Season DVD commentary for the episode "El Viaje Misterioso de Nuestro Jomer (The Mysterious Voyage of Homer)" (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  3. ^ a b c d e Richmond & Coffman 1997, pp. 220-221.
  4. ^ Karma Waltonen; Denise Du Vernay (4 May 2010). The Simpsons in the Classroom: Embiggening the Learning Experience With the Wisdom of Springfield. McFarland. p. 127. ISBN 978-0-7864-4490-8. Retrieved 3 February 2013.
  5. ^ a b c d Meyer, George (2006). The Simpsons The Complete Eighth Season DVD commentary for the episode "El Viaje Misterioso de Nuestro Jomer (The Mysterious Voyage of Homer)" (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  6. ^ a b c Groening, Matt (2006). The Simpsons The Complete Eighth Season DVD commentary for the episode "El Viaje Misterioso de Nuestro Jomer (The Mysterious Voyage of Homer)" (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  7. ^ Reardon, Jim (2006). The Simpsons The Complete Eighth Season DVD commentary for the episode "El Viaje Misterioso de Nuestro Jomer (The Mysterious Voyage of Homer)" (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  8. ^ Weinstein, Josh; Meyer, George; Groening, Matt; Reardon, Jim (2006). The Simpsons The Complete Eighth Season DVD commentary for the episode "El Viaje Misterioso de Nuestro Jomer (The Mysterious Voyage of Homer)" (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  9. ^ a b Turner 2004.
  10. ^ "HOMERIC VERSE". Entertainment Weekly. May 10, 1996. Retrieved March 26, 2007.
  11. ^ Associated Press (January 9, 1997). "Sugar bowl was sweet for ABC, too". Sun-Sentinel. p. 4E.
  12. ^ Weir, Rich. "Top 10: Simpsons Episodes". Askmen.com. Retrieved March 25, 2007.
  13. ^ Plocek, Keith (November 11, 2011). "Top 10 Simpsons Food Episodes: Tomacco Ribwich with a Side of Guatemalan Insanity Peppers + Skittlebrau". Squid Ink. LA Weekly. Archived from the original on November 13, 2011. Retrieved November 12, 2011. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |newspaper= (help); Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  14. ^ Goldman, Eric; Iverson, Dan; Zoromski, Brian. "Top 25 Simpsons Guest Appearances". IGN. Retrieved March 26, 2007.
  15. ^ Potts, Kimberly. "Favorite 'Simpsons' Guest Stars". AOL. Retrieved November 24, 2008.
  16. ^ Crerar, Simon (July 5, 2007). "The 33 funniest Simpsons cameos ever". The Times. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  17. ^ Martin, Andrew (October 7, 2011). "Top 10 Best Musical Guests On 'The Simpsons'". Prefix Mag. Retrieved October 8, 2011.
  18. ^ Topel, Fred (June 12, 2013). "Best Episode Ever #1: 'The Simpsons'". Crave Online. Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. Retrieved June 14, 2013.
Bibliography

External links

1997 in animation

Events in 1997 in animation.

2003 in animation

The year 2003 in animation involved some animation-related events.

David Silverman (animator)

David Silverman (born March 15, 1957) is an American animator best known for directing numerous episodes of the animated TV series The Simpsons, as well as The Simpsons Movie. Silverman was involved with the series from the very beginning, animating all of the original short Simpsons cartoons that aired on The Tracey Ullman Show. He went on to serve as director of animation for several years. He also did the animation for the 2016 film, The Edge of Seventeen, which was produced by Gracie Films.

Gabba Gabba Hey

"Gabba Gabba Hey" is a catchphrase associated with the punk rock band the Ramones. The phrase is included in the song "Pinhead" (1977), which contains the lyrics: "Gabba gabba, we accept you, we accept you, one of us." The song ends with: "Gabba gabba hey, gabba gabba hey!..."

Hurricane Neddy

"Hurricane Neddy" is the eighth episode of The Simpsons' eighth season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on December 29, 1996. It was written by Steve Young, directed by Bob Anderson, and features a cameo by Jon Lovitz as Jay Sherman from The Critic. In the episode, "Hurricane Barbara" viciously strikes Springfield but, by pure chance, the house of Ned Flanders is the only one destroyed. As a result, he begins to lose his faith in both God and the townspeople around him, especially Homer as he suffers a nervous breakdown.

Jim Reardon

Jim Reardon (born 1965) is an American animation director and storyboard consultant best known for his work on the animated TV series The Simpsons. He has directed over 30 episodes of the series and was credited as a supervising director for seasons 9 through 15. Reardon attended the Character Animation program at the California Institute of the Arts in 1982, where one of his student projects, the satirical cartoon Bring Me the Head of Charlie Brown (1986), has become a cult classic through the likes of YouTube. He was hired by John Kricfalusi as a writer on Mighty Mouse: The New Adventures and later worked on Tiny Toon Adventures. He has been described by Ralph Bakshi as "one of the best cartoon writers in the business".Reardon supervised the storyboard department and co-wrote the Pixar film WALL-E with Andrew Stanton, which was released on June 27, 2008. He was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for WALL-E at the 81st Academy Awards.

Johnny Cash

John R. "Johnny" Cash (born J. R. Cash; February 26, 1932 – September 12, 2003) was an American singer-songwriter, guitarist, actor, and author. He is one of the best-selling music artists of all time, having sold more than 90 million records worldwide. His genre-spanning songs and sound embraced country music, rock and roll, rockabilly, blues, folk, and gospel. This crossover appeal won Cash the rare honor of being inducted into the Country Music, Rock and Roll, and Gospel Music Halls of Fame.

Cash was known for his deep, calm bass-baritone voice, the distinctive sound of his Tennessee Three backing band characterized by train-like chugging guitar rhythms, a rebelliousness coupled with an increasingly somber and humble demeanor, free prison concerts, and a trademark, all-black stage wardrobe, which earned him the nickname "The Man in Black". He traditionally began his concerts by simply introducing himself, "Hello, I'm Johnny Cash," followed by his signature song "Folsom Prison Blues".

Much of Cash's music contained themes of sorrow, moral tribulation, and redemption, especially in the later stages of his career. His other signature songs include "I Walk the Line", "Ring of Fire", "Get Rhythm", and "Man in Black". He also recorded humorous numbers like "One Piece at a Time" and "A Boy Named Sue"; a duet with his future wife, June Carter, called "Jackson" (followed by many further duets after their wedding); and railroad songs including "Hey, Porter", "Orange Blossom Special", and "Rock Island Line". During the last stage of his career, Cash covered songs by several late 20th-century rock artists, notably "Hurt" by Nine Inch Nails and "Rusty Cage" by Soundgarden.

Josh Weinstein

Josh Weinstein (born May 5, 1966) is an American television writer and producer, known for his work on the animated comedy series The Simpsons. Weinstein and Bill Oakley became best friends and writing partners at St. Albans High School; Weinstein then attended Stanford University and was editor-in-chief of the Stanford Chaparral. He worked on several short-term media projects, including writing for the variety show Sunday Best, but was then unemployed for a long period.

Weinstein and Oakley eventually penned a spec script for Seinfeld, after which they wrote "Marge Gets a Job", an episode of The Simpsons. Subsequently, the two were hired to write for the show on a permanent basis in 1992. After they wrote episodes such as "$pringfield (Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Legalized Gambling)", "Bart vs. Australia" and "Who Shot Mr. Burns?", the two were appointed executive producers and showrunners for the seventh and eighth seasons of the show. They attempted to include several emotional episodes focusing on the Simpson family, as well as several high-concept episodes such as "Homer's Enemy", "Two Bad Neighbors" and "The Principal and the Pauper", winning three Primetime Emmy Awards for their work.

After they left The Simpsons, Oakley and Weinstein created Mission Hill. The show was plagued by promotional issues and was swiftly canceled, but in subsequent years has gone on to develop a cult following. They worked as consulting producers on Futurama, then created The Mullets in 2003. The two wrote several unsuccessful TV pilots, and were due to serve as showrunners on Sit Down, Shut Up in 2009. Oakley left the project over a contract dispute, but Weinstein remained until it was canceled. He co-produced and wrote for Futurama again during its Comedy Central revival, winning an Emmy in 2011. Since 2013, Weinstein has served as showrunner for the CBBC series Strange Hill High, and in 2015, Danger Mouse. He has also served as a writer for Season Two of Gravity Falls, co-writing nine of the season's episodes. In 2018, Weinstein co-developed the Netflix animated series Disenchantment with creator Matt Groening, of which he and Oakley are currently serving as co-showrunners. Weinstein is married to journalist Lisa Simmons.

Ken Keeler

Kenneth Keeler (born 1961) is an American television producer and writer. He has written for numerous television series, most notably The Simpsons and Futurama. According to an interview with David X. Cohen, he proved a theorem which appears in the Futurama episode "The Prisoner of Benda".

List of The Simpsons episodes (seasons 1–20)

The Simpsons is an American animated television sitcom created by Matt Groening for the Fox Broadcasting Company. It is a satirical depiction of a middle class American lifestyle epitomized by its eponymous family, which consists of Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, and Maggie. The show is set in the town of Springfield, and lampoons American culture, society, and television, as well as many aspects of the human condition. The family was conceived by Groening shortly before a pitch for a series of animated shorts with producer James L. Brooks. Groening created a dysfunctional family and named the characters after members of his own family, substituting Bart for his own name. The shorts became a part of the Fox series The Tracey Ullman Show on April 19, 1987. After a three-season run, the sketch was developed into a half-hour prime-time show that was an early hit for Fox.Since its debut on December 17, 1989, The Simpsons has broadcast 665 episodes. The show holds several American television longevity records. It is the longest-running prime-time animated series and longest-running sitcom in the United States. On February 19, 2012, The Simpsons reached its 500th episode in the twenty-third season. With its twenty-first season (2009–10), the series surpassed Gunsmoke in seasons to claim the spot as the longest-running American prime-time scripted television series, and later also surpassed Gunsmoke in episode count with the episode "Forgive and Regret" on April 29, 2018.Episodes of The Simpsons have won dozens of awards, including 31 Emmy Awards (with ten for Outstanding Animated Program), 30 Annie Awards, and a Peabody Award. The Simpsons Movie, a feature-length film, was released in theaters worldwide on July 26 and 27, 2007 and grossed US$526.2 million worldwide. The first eighteen seasons are available on DVD in regions 1, 2, and 4, with the twentieth season released on both DVD and Blu-ray in 2010 to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the series. On April 8, 2015, show runner Al Jean announced that there would be no more DVD or Blu-ray releases, shifting focus to digital distribution, although this was later reversed on July 22, 2017. Another two years later, on July 20, 2019, it was announced that Season 19 will be released on December 3, 2019, on DVD.On November 4, 2016, The Simpsons was renewed for seasons 29 and 30. It reached its 600th episode on October 16, 2016, in its twenty-eighth season. The thirtieth season ended on May 12, 2019. On February 6, 2019, The Simpsons was renewed for seasons 31 and 32, in which the latter will contain the 700th episode.Season 31 premiered on September 29, 2019.

List of The Simpsons guest stars

In addition to the show's regular cast of voice actors, celebrity guest stars have been a staple of The Simpsons, an American animated television sitcom created by Matt Groening for the Fox Broadcasting Company, since its first season. The Simpsons focuses on the eponymous family, which consists of Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa and Maggie. The family was initially conceived by Groening for a series of animated shorts, which originally aired as a part of The Tracey Ullman Show between 1987 and 1989. The shorts were developed into a half-hour prime time series which began in December 1989. The series' 29th season began in October 2017 and 665 episodes of The Simpsons have aired. A feature film adaptation of the series called The Simpsons Movie, was released in 2007.

Guest voices have come from a wide range of professions, including actors, athletes, authors, musicians, artists, politicians and scientists. In the show's early years most guest stars voiced original characters, but as the show has continued the number of those appearing as themselves has increased.

The first credited guest star was Marcia Wallace who appeared in "Bart the Genius" in her first stint as Bart's teacher Edna Krabappel. Singer Tony Bennett was the first guest star to appear as himself, appearing briefly in the season two episode "Dancin' Homer". Several guest stars have featured as recurring characters on the show, including Phil Hartman, Joe Mantegna and Kelsey Grammer. Hartman made the most appearances, guest starring 52 times. Grammer, Mantegna, Maurice LaMarche and Frank Welker have appeared twenty times or more; Jon Lovitz and Jackie Mason have appeared over ten times, while Albert Brooks, Glenn Close, Michael Dees, Dana Gould, Terry W. Greene, Valerie Harper, Jan Hooks, Jane Kaczmarek, Stacy Keach, Kipp Lennon, J. K. Simmons, Sally Stevens, George Takei and Michael York have made over five appearances.

Two guest stars, Ricky Gervais and Seth Rogen, earned writing credits for the episodes in which they appeared. Grammer, Mason and three-time guest star Anne Hathaway all won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance for guest voice roles on the show. The show was awarded the Guinness World Record for "Most Guest Stars Featured in a TV Series" in 2010. As of October 13, 2019, there have been 830 guest stars on the show[A], with this figure rising to 835 if The Simpsons Movie is included.

List of The Simpsons guest stars (seasons 1–20)

In addition to the show's regular cast of voice actors, celebrity guest stars have been a staple of The Simpsons, an American animated television sitcom created by Matt Groening for the Fox Broadcasting Company, since its first season. The Simpsons focuses on the eponymous family, which consists of Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa and Maggie. The family was initially conceived by Groening for a series of animated shorts, which originally aired as a part of The Tracey Ullman Show between 1987 and 1989. The shorts were developed into a half-hour prime time series which began in December 1989. The series' 29th season began in October 2017 and 665 episodes of The Simpsons have aired. A feature film adaptation of the series called The Simpsons Movie, was released in 2007.

Guest voices have come from a wide range of professions, including actors, athletes, authors, musicians, artists, politicians and scientists. In the show's early years most guest stars voiced original characters, but as the show has continued the number of those appearing as themselves has increased.

The first credited guest star was Marcia Wallace who appeared in "Bart the Genius" in her first stint as Bart's teacher Edna Krabappel. Singer Tony Bennett was the first guest star to appear as himself, appearing briefly in the season two episode "Dancin' Homer". Several guest stars have featured as recurring characters on the show, including Phil Hartman, Joe Mantegna and Kelsey Grammer. Hartman made the most appearances, guest starring 52 times. Grammer, Mantegna, Maurice LaMarche and Frank Welker have appeared twenty times or more; Jon Lovitz and Jackie Mason have appeared over ten times, while Albert Brooks, Glenn Close, Michael Dees, Dana Gould, Terry W. Greene, Valerie Harper, Jan Hooks, Jane Kaczmarek, Stacy Keach, Kipp Lennon, J. K. Simmons, Sally Stevens, George Takei and Michael York have made over five appearances.

Two guest stars, Ricky Gervais and Seth Rogen, earned writing credits for the episodes in which they appeared. Grammer, Mason and three-time guest star Anne Hathaway all won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance for guest voice roles on the show. The show was awarded the Guinness World Record for "Most Guest Stars Featured in a TV Series" in 2010. As of October 13, 2019, there have been 830 guest stars on the show[A], with this figure rising to 835 if The Simpsons Movie is included.

List of fictional canines in animation

This is a list of fictional canines in animation, and is subsidiary to the List of fictional canines. It is a collection of various notable non-dog canine characters. Dogs can be found under animation in the list of fictional dogs. Wolves can be found under animation in the list of fictional wolves.

List of one-time The Simpsons characters

The following is a list of one-time characters from the American animated television comedy series The Simpsons.

Some of the characters have returned to the show, sometimes in brief speaking appearances, or just 'in the crowd' scenes. Other characters originally intended to be one-time characters have ended up becoming regular cast members, such as Cletus Spuckler, Luigi Risotto, Disco Stu, Groundskeeper Willie, Crazy Cat Lady, Cookie Kwan and Lindsey Naegle.

For purposes of this list, "one-time" means they were central to an episode one time. Some of the characters listed here have appeared in later episodes, but only briefly. The characters are sorted by episode.

Nothing Lasts... But Nothing Is Lost

Nothing Lasts... But Nothing is Lost is a 2005 album by Shpongle. It is the project's third and was announced as their last, though that plan later changed. Like the previous two albums, it features many live musicians and vocalists in combination with computer-generated sounds and spoken-word samples. Stylistically the album can be described as a fusion of world music, intelligent dance music, and psychedelic trance. It is dedicated in memory of author and psychedelic researcher Terence McKenna, whose voice and ideas are used throughout the album. The tracks flow together continuously without any break.

According to Simon Posford, the album actually has 8 songs divided into 20 tracks. Each part symbolizes a phase in the dream sequence. The vinyl version of the album is separated into these 8 tracks, but the track listing is identical to that of the digital and CD versions.

Planet Simpson

Planet Simpson: How a Cartoon Masterpiece Documented an Era and Defined a Generation, also abbreviated to Planet Simpson: How a Cartoon Masterpiece Defined a Generation, is a non-fiction book about The Simpsons, written by Chris Turner and originally published on October 12, 2004 by Random House. The book is partly a memoir and an exploration of the impact The Simpsons has had on popular culture.

The Doodletown Pipers

The Doodletown Pipers (also known as the New Doodletown Pipers) were a 1960s and 1970s easy listening vocal group founded by Ward Ellis, George Wilkins, Bernie Brillstein and Jerry Weintraub.

The Doodletown Pipers made numerous appearances on network television (including The Ed Sullivan Show), and worked with such luminaries as Count Basie, The Carpenters, Perry Como, Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Frank Gorshin, Alan King, Mike Post, Sarah Vaughan, John Wayne, and Rowan and Martin. Members of the group included "Mic" Bell, Mike Campbell, Jim Gilstrap, Teresa Graves, Augie Johnson, Rod Anderson, Tom McKenzie, Samantha Lessard, and Oren Waters.

The Doodletown Pipers are considered by some to be the epitome of bland, squeaky-clean popular music. One critic describes their music paradoxically as "dull-as-lint" yet at the same time "weirdly but undeniably charming." [1] On his television program, Roger Miller referred to them as the "Poodletown Diapers".

The Simpsons (season 8)

The Simpsons' eighth season originally aired on the Fox network between October 27, 1996, and May 18, 1997, beginning with "Treehouse of Horror VII". The showrunners for the eighth production season were Bill Oakley and Josh Weinstein. The aired season contained two episodes that were hold-over episodes from season seven, which Oakley and Weinstein also ran. It also contained two episodes for which Al Jean and Mike Reiss were the show runners.

Season eight received critical acclaim and won multiple awards, including two Emmy Awards: "Homer's Phobia" won for Outstanding Animated Program (for Programming One Hour or Less) in 1997, and Alf Clausen and Ken Keeler won for "Outstanding Individual Achievement in Music and Lyrics" with the song "We Put the Spring in Springfield" from the episode "Bart After Dark". Clausen also received an Emmy nomination for "Outstanding Music Direction" for "Simpsoncalifragilisticexpiala(Annoyed Grunt)cious". "Brother from Another Series" was nominated for the Emmy for "Sound Mixing For a Comedy Series or a Special". For "Homer's Phobia", Mike Anderson won the Annie Award for Best Individual Achievement: Directing in a TV Production, and the WAC Winner Best Director for Primetime Series at the 1998 World Animation Celebration. Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation awarded the episode the GLAAD Media Award for "Outstanding TV – Individual Episode".The DVD box set was released in Region 1 on August 15, 2006, Region 2 on October 2, 2006, and Region 4 on September 27, 2006. The set was released in two different forms: a Maggie-shaped head to match the Homer and Marge shaped heads of the previous two sets and also a standard rectangular shaped box. Like the seventh season box set, both versions are available for sale separately.

The Springfield Files

"The Springfield Files" is the tenth episode of The Simpsons' eighth season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on January 12, 1997. In the episode, Homer believes he has discovered an alien in Springfield. It was written by Reid Harrison and directed by Steven Dean Moore. Leonard Nimoy guest stars as himself and David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson guest star as agents Fox Mulder and Dana Scully, their characters on The X-Files. The episode serves as a crossover with The X-Files and features numerous references to the series. The story came from former showrunners Al Jean and Mike Reiss, who returned to produce this episode while under contract with The Walt Disney Company. It received mostly positive reviews from critics; Jean and Reiss won an Annie Award for producing it.

Season 8
Themed episodes
See also

Languages

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