Ekman transport

Ekman transport, part of Ekman motion theory first investigated in 1902 by Vagn Walfrid Ekman. Winds are the main source of energy for ocean circulation, and Ekman Transport is a component of wind-driven ocean current.[1]. Ekman transport occurs when ocean surface waters are influenced by the friction force acting on them via the wind. As the wind blows it casts a friction force on the ocean surface that drags the upper 10-100m of the water column with it.[2]. However, due to the influence of the Coriolis effect, the ocean water moves at a 90° angle from the direction of the surface wind.[3]. The direction of transport is dependent on the hemisphere: in the northern hemisphere, transport occurs at 90° clockwise from wind direction, while in the southern hemisphere it occurs at a 90° counterclockwise.[4]. This phenomenon was first noted by Fridtjof Nansen, who recorded that ice transport appeared to occur at an angle to the wind direction during his Arctic expedition during the 1890s.[5]. Ekman transport has significant impacts on the biogeochemical properties of the world’s oceans. This is because they lead to upwelling (Ekman suction), downwelling (Ekman pumping) in order to obey mass conservation laws. Mass conservation, in reference to Ekman transfer, requires that any water displaced within an area must be replenished, this can be done by either Ekman suction or Ekman pumping depending on wind patterns.[6].

Ekman layer
Ekman transport is the net motion of fluid as the result of a balance between Coriolis and turbulent drag forces. In the picture above, the wind blowing North creates a surface stress and a resulting Ekman spiral is found below it in the water column.

Theory

Ekman theory explains the theoretical state of circulation if water currents were driven only by the transfer of momentum from the wind. In the physical world, this is difficult to observe because of the influences of many simultaneous current driving forces (for example, pressure and density gradients). Though the following theory technically applies to the idealized situation involving only wind forces, Ekman motion describes the wind-driven portion of circulation seen in the surface layer.[7][8]

Surface currents flow at a 45° angle to the wind due to a balance between the Coriolis force and the drags generated by the wind and the water.[9] If the ocean is divided vertically into thin layers, the magnitude of the velocity (the speed) decreases from a maximum at the surface until it dissipates. The direction also shifts slightly across each subsequent layer (right in the northern hemisphere and left in the southern hemisphere). This is called the Ekman spiral.[10] The layer of water from the surface to the point of dissipation of this spiral is known as the Ekman layer. If all flow over the Ekman layer is integrated, the net transportation is at 90° to the right (left) of the surface wind in the northern (southern) hemisphere.[4].

Mechanisms Behind Ekman Transport

There are three major wind patterns that lead to Ekman suction or pumping. The first being wind patterns that are parallel to the coastline.[11]. Recall that due to the Coriolis effect, surface water moves at a 90°angle to the wind current. If the wind moves in a direction causing the water to be pulled away from the coast Ekman suction will occur.[12]. On the other hand, if the wind is moving in such a way that surface waters move towards the shoreline Ekman pumping will take place.[13]. The second mechanism of wind currents resulting in Ekman transfer is the trade winds both north and south of the equator pulling surface waters towards the poles.[14]. There is a great deal of Ekman suction at the equator because water is being pulled northward north of the equator and southward south of the equator. This leads to a divergence in the water, resulting in Ekman suction, and therefore, upwelling.[15]. The third wind pattern influencing Ekman transfer is large-scale wind patterns in the open ocean.[16]. Open ocean wind circulation can lead to gyre-like structures of piled up sea surface water resulting in horizontal gradients of sea surface height.[17]. This pile up of water causes the water to have a downward flow and suction, due to gravity and the concept of mass balance. Ekman pumping in the central ocean is a consequence of this convergence of water.[18].

Ekman Suction

Ekman Suction is the component of Ekman transport that results in areas of upwelling due to the divergence of water.[19]. Returning to the concept of mass conservation, any water displaced by Ekman transport must be replenished. As the water diverges it creates space and acts as a suction in order to fill in the space by pulling up, or upwelling, deep sea water to the euphotic zone.[20]. Ekman suction has major consequences for the biogeochemical processes in the area because it leads to upwelling. Upwelling carries nutrient rich, and cold deep-sea water to the euphotic zone, promoting phytoplankton blooms and kickstarting an extremely high-productive environment.[21]. Areas of upwelling leads to the promotion of fisheries, in fact nearly half of the world’s fish catch comes from areas of upwelling.[22]. Ekman suction occurs both along coastlines and in the open ocean, but also occurs along the equator. Along the Pacific coastline of California, Central America, and Peru, as well as along the Atlantic coastline of Africa there are areas of upwelling due to Ekman suction.[23]. Due to the Coriolis effect the surface water moves 90° to the left of the wind current, therefore causing the water to diverge from the coast boundary, leading to Ekman suction. Additionally, there are areas of upwelling as a consequence of Ekman suction where the Polar Easterlies winds meet the Westerlies in the subpolar regions north of the subtropics, as well as were the Northeast Trade Winds meet the Southeast Trade Winds along the Equator.[24]. Similarly, due to the Coriolis effect the surface water moves 90° to the left of the wind currents the surface water diverges along these boundaries, resulting in upwelling in order to conserve mass.

Ekman Pumping

Ekman Pumping is the component of Ekman transport that results in areas of downwelling due to the convergence of water.[25]. As discussed above, the concept of mass conservation requires that a pile up of surface water must be pushed downward. This pile up of warm, nutrient-poor surface water gets pumped vertically down the water column, resulting in areas of downwelling.[26]. Ekman pumping has dramatic impacts on the surrounding environments. Downwelling, due to Ekman pumping, leads to nutrient poor waters, therefore reducing the biological productivity of the area.[27]. Additionally, it transports heat and dissolved oxygen vertically down the water column as warm oxygen rich surface water is being pumped towards the deep ocean water.[28]. Ekman pumping can be found along the coasts as well as in the open ocean. Along the Pacific Coast in the Southern Hemisphere northerly winds move parallel to the coastline.[29]. Due to the Coriolis effect the surface water gets pulled 90° to the right of the wind current, therefore causing the water to converge along the coast boundary, leading to Ekman pumping. In the open ocean we see Ekman pumping occur with gyres.[30]. Specifically, in the subtropics, between 20°N and 50°N, there is Ekman pumping as the Tradewinds shift to the Westerlies causing a pile up of surface water.[31].

Mathematical derivation

Some assumptions of the fluid dynamics involved in the process must be made in order to simplify the process to a point where it is solvable. The assumptions made by Ekman were:[32]

  • no boundaries;
  • infinitely deep water;
  • eddy viscosity, , is constant (this is only true for laminar flow. In the turbulent atmospheric and oceanic boundary layer it is a strong function of depth);
  • the wind forcing is steady and has been blowing for a long time;
  • barotropic conditions with no geostrophic flow;
  • the Coriolis parameter, is kept constant.

The simplified equations for the Coriolis force in the x and y directions follow from these assumptions:

(1) 
(2) 

where is the wind stress, is the density, is the East-West velocity, and is the north-south velocity.

Integrating each equation over the entire Ekman layer:

where

Here and represent the zonal and meridional mass transport terms with units of mass per unit time per unit length. Contrarily to common logic, north-south winds cause mass transport in the East-West direction.[33]

In order to understand the vertical velocity structure of the water column, equations 1 and 2 can be rewritten in terms of the vertical eddy viscosity term.

where is the vertical eddy viscosity coefficient.

This gives a set of differential equations of the form

In order to solve this system of two differential equations, two boundary conditions can be applied:

  • as
  • friction is equal to wind stress at the free surface ().

Things can be further simplified by considering wind blowing in the y-direction only. This means is the results will be relative to a north-south wind (although these solutions could be produced relative to wind in any other direction):[34]

(3) 

where

  • and represent Ekman transport in the u and v direction;
  • in equation 3 the plus sign applies to the northern hemisphere and the minus sign to the southern hemisphere;
  • is the wind stress on the sea surface;
  • is the Ekman depth (depth of Ekman layer).

By solving this at z=0, the surface current is found to be (as expected) 45 degrees to the right (left) of the wind in the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere. This also gives the expected shape of the Ekman spiral, both in magnitude and direction.[34] Integrating these equations over the Ekman layer shows that the net Ekman transport term is 90 degrees to the right (left) of the wind in the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere.

Summary

  • Ekman transport leads to coastal upwelling, which provides the nutrient supply for some of the largest fishing markets on the planet[35] and can impact the stability of the Antarctic Ice Sheet by pulling warm deep water onto the continental shelf.[36][37] Wind in these regimes blows parallel to the coast (such as along the coast of Peru, where the wind blows out of the southeast, and also in California, where it blows out of the northwest). From Ekman transport, surface water has a net movement of 90° to right of wind direction in the northern hemisphere (left in the southern hemisphere). Because the surface water flows away from the coast, the water must be replaced with water from below.[38] In shallow coastal waters, the Ekman spiral is normally not fully formed and the wind events that cause upwelling episodes are typically rather short. This leads to many variations in the extent of upwelling, but the ideas are still generally applicable.[39]
  • Ekman transport is similarly at work in equatorial upwelling, where, in both hemispheres, a trade wind component towards the west causes a net transport of water towards the pole, and a trade wind component towards the east causes a net transport of water away from the pole.[35]
  • On smaller scales, cyclonic winds induce Ekman transport which causes net divergence and upwelling, or Ekman suction,[35] while anti-cyclonic winds cause net convergence and downwelling, or Ekman pumping[40]
  • Ekman transport is also a factor in the circulation of the ocean gyres. Ekman transport causes water to flow toward the center of the gyre in all locations, creating a sloped sea-surface, and initiating geostrophic flow (Colling p 65). Harald Sverdrup applied Ekman transport while including pressure gradient forces to develop a theory for this (see Sverdrup balance).[40] See: Garbage Patch

See also

  • Ekman velocity – Wind induced part of the total horizontal velocity in the upper layer of water of the open ocean such that Coriolis force is balanced by wind force

Notes

  1. ^ Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gruber, Nicolas (2006). Ocean biogeochemical dynamics. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-01707-5.
  2. ^ Emerson, Steven R.; Hedges, John I. (2017). Chemical Oceanography and the Marine Carbon Cycle. New York, United States of America: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-83313-4.
  3. ^ Emerson, Steven R.; Hedges, John I. (2017). Chemical Oceanography and the Marine Carbon Cycle. New York, United States of America: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-83313-4.
  4. ^ a b Colling, pp 42-44
  5. ^ Pond & Pickard, p 101
  6. ^ Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gruber, Nicolas (2006). Ocean biogeochemical dynamics. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-01707-5.
  7. ^ Colling p 44
  8. ^ Sverdrup p 228
  9. ^ Mann & Lazier p 169
  10. ^ Knauss p 124.
  11. ^ Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gruber, Nicolas (2006). Ocean biogeochemical dynamics. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-01707-5.
  12. ^ Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gruber, Nicolas (2006). Ocean biogeochemical dynamics. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-01707-5.
  13. ^ Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gruber, Nicolas (2006). Ocean biogeochemical dynamics. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-01707-5.
  14. ^ Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gruber, Nicolas (2006). Ocean biogeochemical dynamics. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-01707-5.
  15. ^ Emerson, Steven R.; Hedges, John I. (2017). Chemical oceanography and the marine carbon cycle. New York, United States of America: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-83313-4.
  16. ^ Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gruber, Nicolas (2006). Ocean biogeochemical dynamics. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-01707-5.
  17. ^ Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gruber, Nicolas (2006). Ocean biogeochemical dynamics. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-01707-5.
  18. ^ Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gruber, Nicolas (2006). Ocean biogeochemical dynamics. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-01707-5.
  19. ^ Emerson, Steven R.; Hedges, John I. (2017). Chemical oceanography and the marine carbon cycle. New York, United States of America: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-83313-4.
  20. ^ Emerson, Steven R.; Hedges, John I. (2017). Chemical oceanography and the marine carbon cycle. New York, United States of America: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-83313-4.
  21. ^ Miller, Charles B.; Wheeler, Patricia A. Biological Oceanography (Secondition ed.). Wiley-Blackwell. ISBN 978-1-4443-3302-2.
  22. ^ Lindstrom, Eric J. "Ocean Motion : Definition : Wind Driven Surface Currents - Upwelling and Downwelling". oceanmotion.org.
  23. ^ Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gruber, Nicolas (2006). Ocean biogeochemical dynamics. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-01707-5.
  24. ^ Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gruber, Nicolas (2006). Ocean biogeochemical dynamics. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-01707-5.
  25. ^ Emerson, Steven R.; Hedges, John I. (2017). Chemical oceanography and the marine carbon cycle. New York, United States of America: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-83313-4.
  26. ^ Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gruber, Nicolas (2006). Ocean biogeochemical dynamics. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-01707-5.
  27. ^ Lindstrom, Eric J. "Ocean Motion : Definition : Wind Driven Surface Currents - Upwelling and Downwelling". oceanmotion.org.
  28. ^ Lindstrom, Eric J. "Ocean Motion : Definition : Wind Driven Surface Currents - Upwelling and Downwelling". oceanmotion.org.
  29. ^ Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gruber, Nicolas (2006). Ocean biogeochemical dynamics. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-01707-5.
  30. ^ Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gruber, Nicolas (2006). Ocean biogeochemical dynamics. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-01707-5.
  31. ^ Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gruber, Nicolas (2006). Ocean biogeochemical dynamics. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-01707-5.
  32. ^ Pond & Pickard p. 106
  33. ^ Knauss p. 123
  34. ^ a b Pond & Pickard p.108
  35. ^ a b c Knauss p 125
  36. ^ Anderson, R. F.; Ali, S.; Bradtmiller, L. I.; Nielsen, S. H. H.; Fleisher, M. Q.; Anderson, B. E.; Burckle, L. H. (2009-03-13). "Wind-Driven Upwelling in the Southern Ocean and the Deglacial Rise in Atmospheric CO2". Science. 323 (5920): 1443–1448. Bibcode:2009Sci...323.1443A. doi:10.1126/science.1167441. ISSN 0036-8075. PMID 19286547.
  37. ^ Greene, Chad A.; Blankenship, Donald D.; Gwyther, David E.; Silvano, Alessandro; Wijk, Esmee van (2017-11-01). "Wind causes Totten Ice Shelf melt and acceleration". Science Advances. 3 (11): e1701681. Bibcode:2017SciA....3E1681G. doi:10.1126/sciadv.1701681. ISSN 2375-2548. PMC 5665591. PMID 29109976.
  38. ^ Mann & Lazier p 172
  39. ^ Colling p 43
  40. ^ a b Pond & Pickard p 295

References

  • Colling, A., Ocean Circulation, Open University Course Team. Second Edition. 2001. ISBN 978-0-7506-5278-0
  • Emerson, Steven R.; Hedges, John I. (2017). Chemical Oceanography and the Marine Carbon Cycle. New York, United States of America: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-83313-4.
  • Knauss, J.A., Introduction to Physical Oceanography, Waveland Press. Second Edition. 2005. ISBN 978-1-57766-429-1
  • Lindstrom, Eric J. "Ocean Motion : Definition : Wind Driven Surface Currents - Upwelling and Downwelling". oceanmotion.org.
  • Mann, K.H. and Lazier J.R., Dynamics of Marine Ecosystems, Blackwell Publishing. Third Edition. 2006. ISBN 978-1-4051-1118-8
  • Miller, Charles B.; Wheeler, Patricia A. Biological Oceanography (Secondition ed.). Wiley-Blackwell. ISBN 978-1-4443-3302-2.
  • Pond, S. and Pickard, G. L., Introductory Dynamical Oceanography, Pergamon Press. Second edition. 1983. ISBN 978-0-08-028728-7
  • Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gruber, Nicolas (2006). Ocean biogeochemical dynamics. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-01707-5.
  • Sverdrup, K.A., Duxbury, A.C., Duxbury, A.B., An Introduction to The World's Oceans, McGraw-Hill. Eighth Edition. 2005. ISBN 978-0-07-294555-3

External links

Antarctic Intermediate Water

Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) is a cold, relatively low salinity water mass found mostly at intermediate depths in the Southern Ocean. The AAIW is formed at the ocean surface in the Antarctic Convergence zone or more commonly called the Antarctic Polar Front zone. This convergence zone is normally located between 50°S and 60°S, hence this is where almost all of the AAIW is formed.

Beaufort Gyre

The Beaufort Gyre is a wind-driven ocean current located in the Arctic Ocean polar region. The gyre contains both ice and water. It accumulates fresh water by the process of melting the ice floating on the surface of the water.

California Current

The California Current is a Pacific Ocean current that moves southward along the western coast of North America, beginning off southern British Columbia and ending off southern Baja California Peninsula. It is considered an Eastern boundary current due to the influence of the North American coastline on its course. It is also one of five major coastal currents affiliated with strong upwelling zones, the others being the Humboldt Current, the Canary Current, the Benguela Current, and the Somali Current. The California Current is part of the North Pacific Gyre, a large swirling current that occupies the northern basin of the Pacific.

Downwelling

Downwelling is the process of accumulation and sinking of higher density material beneath lower density material, such as cold or saline water beneath warmer or fresher water or cold air beneath warm air. It is the sinking limb of a convection cell. Upwelling is the opposite process and together these two forces are responsible in the oceans for the thermohaline circulation. The sinking of cold lithosphere at subduction zones is another example of downwelling in plate tectonics.

Ekman

Ekman is a surname of Swedish origin which may refer to

Ekman layer

The Ekman layer is the layer in a fluid where there is a force balance between pressure gradient force, Coriolis force and turbulent drag. It was first described by Vagn Walfrid Ekman. Ekman layers occur both in the atmosphere and in the ocean.

There are two types of Ekman layers. The first type occurs at the surface of the ocean and is forced by surface winds, which act as a drag on the surface of the ocean. The second type occurs at the bottom of the atmosphere and ocean, where frictional forces are associated with flow over rough surfaces.

Ekman spiral

The Ekman spiral is a structure of currents or winds near a horizontal boundary in which the flow direction rotates as one moves away from the boundary. It derives its name from the Swedish oceanographer Vagn Walfrid Ekman. The deflection of surface currents was first noticed by the Norwegian oceanographer Fridtjof Nansen during the Fram expedition (1893–1896) and the effect was first physically explained by Vagn Walfrid Ekman.

Ekman velocity

In oceanography, Ekman velocity – also referred as a kind of the residual ageostropic velocity as it derivates from geostrophy – is part of the total horizontal velocity (u) in the upper layer of water of the open ocean. This velocity, caused by winds blowing over the surface of the ocean, is such that the Coriolis force on this layer is balanced by the force of the wind.

Typically, it takes about two days for the Ekman velocity to develop before it is directed at right angles to the wind. The Ekman velocity is named after the Swedish oceanographer Vagn Walfrid Ekman (1874–1954).

Equatorial Counter Current

The Equatorial Counter Current is an eastward flowing, wind-driven current which extends to depths of 100-150m in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans. More often called the North Equatorial Countercurrent (NECC), this current flows west-to-east at about 3-10°N in the Atlantic, Indian Ocean and Pacific basins, between the North Equatorial Current (NEC) and the South Equatorial Current (SEC). The NECC is not to be confused with the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) that flows eastward along the equator at depths around 200m in the western Pacific rising to 100m in the eastern Pacific.

In the Indian Ocean, circulation is dominated by the impact of the reversing Asian monsoon winds. As such, the current tends to reverse hemispheres seasonally in that basin. The NECC has a pronounced seasonal cycle in the Atlantic and Pacific, reaching maximum strength in late boreal summer and fall and minimum strength in late boreal winter and spring. Furthermore, the NECC in the Atlantic disappears in late winter and early spring.The NECC is an interesting case because while it results from wind-driven circulation, it transports water against the mean westward wind stress in the tropics. This apparent paradox is concisely explained by Sverdrup theory, which shows that the east-west transport is governed by the north-south change in the curl of the wind stress.The Pacific NECC is also known to be stronger during warm episodes of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Klaus Wyrtki, who first reported this connection, suggested that a stronger than normal NECC could be the cause of an El Niño because of the extra volume of warm water it carried eastwards.

There is also a South Equatorial Countercurrent (SECC) that transports water from west to east in the Pacific and Atlantic basins between 2°S and 5°S in the western basin and farther south toward the east. While the SECC is geostrophic in nature, the physical mechanism for its appearance is less clear than with the NECC; that is, Sverdrup theory does not obviously explain its existence. Additionally, the seasonal cycle of the SECC is not as defined as that of the NECC.

Great South Australian Coastal Upwelling System

The Great South Australian Coastal Upwelling System is a seasonal upwelling system in the eastern Great Australian Bight, extending from Ceduna, South Australia, to Portland, Victoria, over a distance of about 800 kilometres (500 mi). Upwelling events occur in the austral summer (from November to May) when seasonal winds blow from the southeast. These winds blow parallel to the shoreline at certain areas of the coast, which forces coastal waters offshore via Ekman transport and draws up cold, nutrient-rich waters from the ocean floor.Because the deep water carries abundant nutrients up from the ocean floor, the upwelling area differs from the rest of the Great Australian Bight, especially the areas offshore of Western Australia and the Nullabor in South Australia, which are generally nutrient-poor. Every summer, the upwelling sustains a bountiful ecosystem that attracts blue whales and supports rich fisheries.The Great South Australian Coastal Upwelling System (GSACUS) is Australia's only deep-reaching coastal upwelling system, with nutrient-enriched water stemming from depths exceeding 300 metres (980 ft).Recently, a new upwelling centre has been discovered on the western shelf of Tasmania. Since this new upwelling centre is located outside South Australian waters, the entire upwelling system should be rather called the Great Southern Australian Coastal Upwelling System.

North Pacific Gyre

The North Pacific Gyre (NPG) or North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG), located in the northern Pacific Ocean, is one of the five major oceanic gyres. This gyre covers most of the northern Pacific Ocean. It is the largest ecosystem on Earth, located between the equator and 50° N latitude, and comprising 20 million square kilometers.

The gyre has a clockwise circular pattern and is formed by four prevailing ocean currents: the North Pacific Current to the north, the California Current to the east, the North Equatorial Current to the south, and the Kuroshio Current to the west. It is the site of an unusually intense collection of man-made marine debris, known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.

The North Pacific Subtropical Gyre and the much smaller North Pacific Subpolar Gyre make up the two major gyre systems in the mid-latitudes of the Northern Pacific Ocean. This two-gyre circulation in the North Pacific is driven by the trade and westerly winds. This is one of the best examples of all of Earth’s oceans where these winds drive a two-gyre circulation. Physical characteristics like weak thermohaline circulation in the North Pacific and it is mostly blocked by land in the north, also help facilitate this circulation. As depth increases, these gyres in the North Pacific grow smaller and weaker, and the high pressure at the center of the Subtropical Gyre will migrate poleward and westward.

Ocean dynamics

Ocean dynamics define and describe the motion of water within the oceans. Ocean temperature and motion fields can be separated into three distinct layers: mixed (surface) layer, upper ocean (above the thermocline), and deep ocean.

Ocean dynamics has traditionally been investigated by sampling from instruments in situ.The mixed layer is nearest to the surface and can vary in thickness from 10 to 500 meters. This layer has properties such as temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen which are uniform with depth reflecting a history of active turbulence (the atmosphere has an analogous planetary boundary layer). Turbulence is high in the mixed layer. However, it becomes zero at the base of the mixed layer. Turbulence again increases below the base of the mixed layer due to shear instabilities. At extratropical latitudes this layer is deepest in late winter as a result of surface cooling and winter storms and quite shallow in summer. Its dynamics is governed by turbulent mixing as well as Ekman pumping, exchanges with the overlying atmosphere, and horizontal advection.The upper ocean, characterized by warm temperatures and active motion, varies in depth from 100 m or less in the tropics and eastern oceans to in excess of 800 meters in the western subtropical oceans. This layer exchanges properties such as heat and freshwater with the atmosphere on timescales of a few years. Below the mixed layer the upper ocean is generally governed by the hydrostatic and geostrophic relationships. Exceptions include the deep tropics and coastal regions.

The deep ocean is both cold and dark with generally weak velocities (although limited areas of the deep ocean are known to have significant recirculations). The deep ocean is supplied with water from the upper ocean in only a few limited geographical regions: the subpolar North Atlantic and several sinking regions around the Antarctic. Because of the weak supply of water to the deep ocean the average residence time of water in the deep ocean is measured in hundreds of years. In this layer as well the hydrostatic and geostrophic relationships are generally valid and mixing is generally quite weak.

Ocean gyre

In oceanography, a gyre () is any large system of circulating ocean currents, particularly those involved with large wind movements. Gyres are caused by the Coriolis effect; planetary vorticity along with horizontal and vertical friction, determine the circulation patterns from the wind stress curl (torque).The term gyre can be used to refer to any type of vortex in an atmosphere or a sea, even one that is man-made, but it is most commonly used in terrestrial oceanography to refer to the major ocean systems.

Papagayo Jet

The Papagayo jet, also referred to as the Papagayo Wind or the Papagayo Wind Jet, are strong intermittent winds that blow approximately 70 km north of the Gulf of Papagayo, after which they are named. The jet winds travel southwest from the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean through a pass in the Cordillera mountains at Lake Nicaragua. The jet follows the same path as the northeast trade winds in this region; however, due to a unique combination of synoptic scale meteorology and orographic phenomena, the jet winds can reach much greater speeds than their trade wind counterparts. That is to say, the winds occur when cold high-pressure systems from the North American continent meet warm moist air over the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, generating winds that are then funneled through a mountain pass in the Cordillera. The Papagayo jet is also not unique to this region. There are two other breaks in the Cordillera where this same phenomenon occurs, one at the Chivela Pass in México and another at the Panama Canal, producing the Tehuano (Tehuantepecer) and the Panama jets respectively.The Papagayo jet also induces mesoscale meteorology phenomena that influence the pacific waters hundreds of kilometers off the Nicaraguan and Costa Rican shores. When the jet wind surges, it creates cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies, Ekman transport, and upwelling that contribute to the creation of the Costa Rica Dome off the western coast of Central America in the Western Hemisphere Warm Pool (WHWP). The relatively cold, nutrient-rich waters of the dome, in comparison to the surrounding WHWP, create an ideal habitat for a number of species making the Papagayo Wind Jet important for biodiversity in the Eastern Tropical Pacific.

Physical oceanography

Physical oceanography is the study of physical conditions and physical processes within the ocean, especially the motions and physical properties of ocean waters.

Physical oceanography is one of several sub-domains into which oceanography is divided. Others include biological, chemical and geological oceanography.

Physical oceanography may be subdivided into descriptive and dynamical physical oceanography.Descriptive physical oceanography seeks to research the ocean through observations and complex numerical models, which describe the fluid motions as precisely as possible.

Dynamical physical oceanography focuses primarily upon the processes that govern the motion of fluids with emphasis upon theoretical research and numerical models. These are part of the large field of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (GFD) that is shared together with meteorology. GFD is a sub field of Fluid dynamics describing flows occurring on spatial and temporal scales that are greatly influenced by the Coriolis force.

Somali Current

The Somali Current is a cold ocean boundary current that runs along the coast of Somalia and Oman in the Western Indian Ocean and is analogous to the Gulf Stream in the Atlantic Ocean. This current is heavily influenced by the monsoons and is the only major upwelling system that occurs on a western boundary of an ocean. The water that is upwelled by the current merges with another upwelling system, creating one of the most productive ecosystems in the ocean.The Somali current is characterized by seasonal changes influenced by the Southwest monsoon and the Northeast Monsoon. During the months of June to September, the warm Southwest monsoon moves the coastal waters northeastward, creating coastal upwelling. The upwelled water is carried offshore by Ekman transport and merges with water that was brought to the surface by open-ocean upwelling. The Findlater jet, a narrow low-level, atmospheric jet, also develops during the Southwest monsoon, and blows diagonally across the Indian Ocean, parallel to the coasts of Somalia and Oman. As a result, an Ekman transport is created to the right of the wind. At the center of the jet, the transport is maximum and decreases to the right and left with increasing distance. To the left of the jet center, there is less water movement toward the center than is leaving, creating a divergence in the upper layer and resulting in an upwelling event (Ekman suction). In contrast, to the right of the center of the jet, more water is coming from the center than is leaving, creating a downwelling event (Ekman pumping). This open-ocean upwelling in combination with the coastal upwelling cause a massive upwelling. The Northeast monsoon, which occurs from December to February, causes a reversal of the Somalia current, moving the coastal waters southwest. Cooler air causes the surface water to cool and creates deep mixing, bringing abundant nutrients to the surface.

Sverdrup balance

The Sverdrup balance, or Sverdrup relation, is a theoretical relationship between the wind stress exerted on the surface of the open ocean and the vertically integrated meridional (north-south) transport of ocean water.

Upwelling

Upwelling is an oceanographic phenomenon that involves wind-driven motion of dense, cooler, and usually nutrient-rich water towards the ocean surface, replacing the warmer, usually nutrient-depleted surface water. The nutrient-rich upwelled water stimulates the growth and reproduction of primary producers such as phytoplankton. Due to the biomass of phytoplankton and presence of cool water in these regions, upwelling zones can be identified by cool sea surface temperatures (SST) and high concentrations of chlorophyll-a.The increased availability of nutrients in upwelling regions results in high levels of primary production and thus fishery production. Approximately 25% of the total global marine fish catches come from five upwellings that occupy only 5% of the total ocean area. Upwellings that are driven by coastal currents or diverging open ocean have the greatest impact on nutrient-enriched waters and global fishery yields.

Wave base

The wave base, in physical oceanography, is the maximum depth at which a water wave's passage causes significant water motion. For water depths deeper than the wave base, bottom sediments and the seafloor are no longer stirred by the wave motion above.

Currents
Gyres
Related
Waves
Circulation
Tides
Landforms
Plate
tectonics
Ocean zones
Sea level
Acoustics
Satellites
Related
Modes
Recreational
diving

specialties
Diving equipment
Occupations
Diving safety:
Hazards,
risks and
consequences
Procedures
History
Publications
Related

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.