Egon Henninger

Egon Henninger (born 22 June 1940) is a German former swimmer. He competed at the 1960, 1964 and 1968 Summer Olympics in the 200 m breaststroke and finished in fourth, fifth and sixth place, respectively. He won silver medals in the 4 × 100 m medley relay in 1964 and 1968.[1] He won three medals in these two swimming events at the European championships in 1962 and 1966.[2]

Egon Henninger
Bundesarchiv Bild 183-F1111-0008-001, Egon Henninger
Egon Henninger in 1967
Personal information
Born22 June 1940 (age 78)
Kühlungsborn, Germany
Height1.74 m (5 ft 9 in)
Weight76 kg (168 lb)
Sport
SportSwimming
ClubASK Vorwärts Rostock

References

  1. ^ "Egon Henninger". sports-reference. Archived from the original on 8 November 2012. Retrieved 5 May 2012.
  2. ^ Schwimmen – Europameisterschaften (Herren – Teil 2). sport-komplett.de
1940

1940 (MCMXL)

was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1940th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 940th year of the 2nd millennium, the 40th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1940s decade.

1962 European Aquatics Championships

The 1962 European Aquatics Championships were held in Leipzig, East Germany from 18 to 25 August 1962. Titles were contested in swimming, diving and water polo (men). In the men's swimming program, the 100 m backstroke had been replaced by the 200 m backstroke. Furthermore, the 400 m individual medley and the 4 × 100 m freestyle relay were introduced. In women's swimming, the 400 m individual medley was introduced.

1966 European Aquatics Championships

The 1966 European Aquatics Championships were held in Utrecht, Netherlands from 20 to 27 August 1966. Titles were contested in swimming, diving and water polo (men).

Ian O'Brien

Ian Lovett O'Brien (born 3 March 1947) is an Australian breaststroke swimmer of the 1960s who won the 200 metre breaststroke at the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo in world record time. He won five Commonwealth Games gold medals and claimed a total of nine individual and six relay titles at the Australian Championships, before retiring at the age of 21 due to financial pressures.

After showing promise at an early age, O'Brien was sent to Sydney to train under renowned coach Forbes Carlile and his breaststroke assistant Terry Gathercole. He competed in his first national championships in 1962 at the age of 15, winning the 220 yard breaststroke to gain selection for the 1962 British Empire and Commonwealth Games in Perth, where he won both the 110 and 220 yd (200 m) breaststroke and the 4 × 110 yd medley relay.

He won both breaststroke events at the 1963 Australian Championships, repeating the feat for the next three years. In 1964, O'Brien went to the Tokyo Olympics and came from third at the 150 m mark to win the gold medal. He added a bronze in the medley relay. O'Brien successfully defended both his breaststroke titles at the 1966 British Empire and Commonwealth Games in Kingston, Jamaica before retiring to support his family. Swimming officials persuaded him to make a comeback for the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, as Australia did not have a breaststroker, and after a crash diet, he finished sixth in the 100 m event but failed to reach the final in the 200 m event. He then retired and went into the television industry.

List of 1964 Summer Olympics medal winners

The following is a list of medalists at the 1964 Summer Olympics, held in Tokyo, from 10 to 24 October 1964.

List of European Aquatics Championships medalists in swimming (men)

This is the complete list of men's LEN European Aquatics Championships medalists in swimming from 1926 to date.

List of Olympic medalists in swimming (men)

This is the complete list of men's Olympic medalists in swimming.

Swimming at the 1960 Summer Olympics – Men's 200 metre breaststroke

The men's 200 metre breaststroke event at the 1960 Olympic Games took place between August 26 and August 30. This swimming event used the breaststroke. Because an Olympic size swimming pool is 50 metres long, this race consisted of four lengths of the pool.

Swimming at the 1964 Summer Olympics

At the 1964 Summer Olympics, eighteen swimming events were contested, ten for men and eight for women. There were a total of 405 participants from 42 countries competing. For the first time, the 4×100 metres freestyle relay for men and the 400 metres individual medley for both men and women were contested. Olympic records were broken in all events and the world record was broken in ten events. This competition also marked the debut of electronic touchpads for timing.

Swimming at the 1964 Summer Olympics – Men's 200 metre breaststroke

The men's 200 metre breaststroke event at the 1964 Summer Olympics took place between October 13 and October 15. This swimming event used the breaststroke. Because an Olympic-size swimming pool is 50 metres long, this race consisted of four lengths of the pool.

Swimming at the 1964 Summer Olympics – Men's 4 × 100 metre medley relay

The men's 4×100 metre medley relay event at the 1964 Olympic Games took place on October 15 (qualification) and October 16 (final). This swimming event uses medley swimming as a relay. Because an Olympic size swimming pool is 50 metres long, each of the four swimmers completed two lengths of the pool, each using a different stroke. The first on each team used the backstroke, the second used the breaststroke, the third used the butterfly stroke, and the final swimmer used freestyle (restricted to not allow any of the first three strokes to be used, though nearly all swimmers use front crawl regardless).

The first swimmer must touch the wall before the next can leave the starting block, and so forth; timing of the starts is thus important.

Swimming at the 1968 Summer Olympics

At the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, 29 events in swimming were contested. There was a total of 468 participants from 51 countries competing. The United States dominated the competition, winning 52 of 87 medals.

Swimming at the 1968 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metre breaststroke

The men's 100 metre breaststroke event at the 1968 Summer Olympics took place between 18 and 19 October. This swimming event used the breaststroke. Because an Olympic size swimming pool is 50 metres long, this race consisted of two lengths of the pool.

Swimming at the 1968 Summer Olympics – Men's 200 metre breaststroke

The men's 200 metre breaststroke event at the 1968 Summer Olympics took place between 21 and 22 October. This swimming event used the breaststroke. Because an Olympic-size swimming pool is 50 metres long, this race consisted of four lengths of the pool.

Swimming at the 1968 Summer Olympics – Men's 4 × 100 metre medley relay

The men's 4×100 metre medley relay event at the 1968 Olympic Games took place on October 26. This swimming event uses medley swimming as a relay. Because an Olympic size swimming pool is 50 metres long, each of the four swimmers completed two lengths of the pool, each using a different stroke. The first on each team used the backstroke, the second used the breaststroke, the third used the butterfly stroke, and the final swimmer used freestyle (restricted to not allow any of the first three strokes to be used, though nearly all swimmers use front crawl regardless).

The first swimmer must touch the wall before the next can leave the starting block, and so forth; timing of the starts is thus important.

World record progression 4 × 100 metres medley relay

This article includes the world record progression for the 4×100 metres medley relay, and it shows the chronological history of world record times in that competitive swimming event. The 4×100 metres medley relay is a medley race in which each of four swimmers on a team swims a 100-metre leg of the relay, each swimming a different stroke, in the following sequence:

Backstroke (this can only be the first stroke, due to the necessity of starting this leg in the pool rather than by diving in);

Breaststroke;

Butterfly; and

Freestyle ("freestyle" means any stroke other than backstroke, breaststroke or butterfly – most swimmers use the front crawl).Swimming world records are recognized by and maintained by FINA ("Fédération Internationale de Natation"), the international competitive swimming and aquatics federation that overseas the sport in international competition. World records in the medley relay event were first recognized by FINA in 1953. The long course (50-metre pool) world records are historically older than the short-course (25-metre pool) records. FINA amended its regulations governing the recognition of world records in 1956; specifically, FINA mandated that only record times that were contested in 50-metre (or 55-yard) pools were eligible for recognition after that time. The short-course world records have been separately recognized since 1991. On July 25, 2013 FINA Technical Swimming Congress voted to allow world records in the long course mixed 400 free relay and mixed 400 medley relay, as well as in six events in short course meters: the mixed 200 medley and 200 free relays, as well as the men's and women's 200 free relays and the men's and women's 200 medley relays. In October 2013 FINA decided to establish "standards" before something can be recognized as the first world record in these events. But later on March 13, 2014 FINA has officially ratified the eight world records set by Indiana University swimmers at the IU Relay Rally held on September 26, 2013 in Bloomington.It is possible to set an individual world record in the 100 metres backstroke by swimming the backstroke first leg of the 4×100-metre medley relay, except in the mixed relay. Swimming the other three legs of the medley relay cannot qualify as world records as FINA criteria require a "static start" for world record recognition – swimming relay exchanges are characterized as "dynamic".

The first Olympics at which the 4×100 metres medley relay event was contested was the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome.

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