Edwin B. Morgan

Edwin Barber Morgan (May 2, 1806 – October 13, 1881) was an entrepreneur and politician from the Finger Lakes region of western New York. He was the first president of Wells Fargo & Company, founder of the United States Express Company, and director of American Express Company. He was elected to the United States House of Representatives from New York and served for three terms.

Edwin Barber Morgan
Edwin Barber Morgan 2
Member of U.S. House of Representatives from New York's 25th district
In office
March 4, 1853 – March 3, 1859
Preceded byThomas Y. Howe, Jr.
Succeeded byMartin Butterfield
Personal details
BornMay 2, 1806
Aurora, New York
DiedOctober 13, 1881
Ledyard, New York
Political partyWhig (1852)
Opposition Party (1854)
Republican (1856)

Early life and education

Edwin Barber Morgan was born in Aurora, New York, the eldest son of Christopher and Nancy (Barber) Morgan.[1] The family was descended from Owain Gwynedd, once Prince of Wales.[2] Educated at the Cayuga Lake Academy, Morgan became a clerk in his father's mercantile enterprise at 13, and at 21 he took over the business.[3]

Christopher Morgan was Edwin's brother,[4] Lewis H. Morgan his cousin[5] and Noyes Barber his uncle.[6] He was a first cousin of Edwin Denison Morgan, governor of New York in 1859–1862.[7]

Marriage and family

On September 27, 1829, Morgan married Charlotte Fidelia Wood of Aurora.[8] The couple were the parents of a son, Alonzo[9][10] and two daughters, Louise F. and Katharine.[11]

Career

Morgan soon established a large enterprise in buying and shipping agricultural products, and also in boat-building, in which he was joined by his brothers. With his brothers, he also had extensive gypsum beds at Grand Rapids, Michigan, and a starch-making business at Oswego, New York.[12]

In addition to his business career, Morgan was active in the New York Militia as inspector of the 2nd Division, which included units from Cayuga, Wayne, Ontario, Yates, Tompkins, and Seneca Counties.[13] According to New York's militia law, which was first passed in 1827, each division was authorized an inspector at the rank of colonel, and each brigade an inspector at the rank of major;[14] from this military service, Morgan derived the title "Colonel" Morgan, by which he was known even after he was no longer active in the militia.[15]

He was a director and first president of Wells Fargo & Company, organized March 18, 1852, by his fellow townsman Henry Wells, who had been a founder of the American Express Company in 1850. Wells Fargo was developed specifically to offer express mail, shipping and banking services to California, where thousands of people were being drawn as the Gold Rush spurred migration and development. In 1854 Morgan founded the United States Express Company to provide similar express mail services for the Southern states. It connected with Wells Fargo at St. Louis, Missouri.

Also, from about this time until his death in 1881, Morgan was a director of American Express. By the time Morgan became involved, American Express had its headquarters in Manhattan.[16][17]

Morgan was first nominated for a seat in Congress in 1850, but he was defeated by 14 votes.[3] Morgan was elected to Congress in 1852 as a Whig, in 1854 as an Opposition Party candidate, and in 1856 as a Republican. He represented New York's 25th congressional district from March 4, 1853 until March 3, 1859. In 1855–56 he was chairman of the Committee on Patents. Morgan was one of the members of Congress who rescued Charles Sumner from the assault by Preston Brooks on May 22, 1856.[18]

Early in his Congressional service, Morgan resigned as president of Wells Fargo but remained a member of the board of directors. He was not a candidate for reelection in 1858. On July 20, 1858, he resigned his seat on the Wells Fargo board, and N.H. Stockwell was elected to succeed him. In November 1858, however, Thomas M. Janes resigned, and Morgan was again elected to the board.[19]

Later years

During the American Civil War, Morgan was active in raising and equipping regiments from New York.

In the postwar period he became active with colleges. He was a trustee of Cornell University from 1865 until 1874. Working with his friend Henry Wells to found a college for women, he was a charter trustee of Wells College from 1868 until 1881, where he served as president of the board from 1878 onward. He was also a trustee of the Auburn Theological Seminary from 1870 to 1881. He supported the secondary school of Cayuga Lake Academy in Aurora as well.[20]

Morgan was a director of Wells Fargo until the beginning of 1867.[21] After a brief retirement, he was elected to the board in 1868 and served until 1870.[22] An original shareholder of The New York Times, Morgan came to the paper's rescue in the midst of its fight against William Magear Tweed in 1871. George Jones, the editor, feared that ownership of the paper would pass into unfriendly hands. For $375,000, Morgan purchased enough stock to avert this, and contributed materially to Tweed's eventual downfall.[23]

Morgan was physically and mentally quick-moving and incessantly active, even in old age. He died at Ledyard, New York on October 13, 1881, at the age of 75.[9] Interment was at Oak Glen Cemetery in Aurora.

Notes

  1. ^ The National Cyclopedia of American Biography. J.T. White. 1906. p. 218.
  2. ^ Charles Henry Browning (1911). Americans of Royal Descent: Collection of Genealogies Showing the Lineal Descent from Kings of Some American Families ... Genealogical Publishing Com. pp. 73–74. ISBN 978-0-8063-0054-2.
  3. ^ a b E.G. Storke. History of Cayuga County. Рипол Классик. p. 400. ISBN 978-5-87813-480-4.
  4. ^ "Morgan, Christopher - Biographical Information". Biographical Dictionary of the American Congress. Retrieved 2017-03-13.
  5. ^ Scott W. Anderson (13 October 2015). Auburn, New York: The Entrepreneurs’ Frontier. Syracuse University Press. p. 7. ISBN 978-0-8156-5330-1.
  6. ^ "Barber, Noyes - Biographical Information". Biographical Dictionary of the American Congress. Retrieved 2017-03-13.
  7. ^ Archives and Special Collections (2011). Biographical Note, E. B. Morgan Collection (PDF). Aurora, Cayuga County, NY: Wells College. p. 2.
  8. ^ Dictionary of American Biography, Vol. XIII, p. 168.
  9. ^ a b General Catalogue of the Officers & Students: With Historical Sketches of the Founder, Henry Wells, & the Hon. Edwin Barber Morgan, Its Principal Benefactor...1868-1894. 1894. pp. 29–.
  10. ^ Annual Catalogue... 1894. p. 31.
  11. ^ Cayuga County Historical Society (1908). History of Cayuga County, New York. Authors. p. 544.
  12. ^ Dictionary of American Biography, Vol. XIII, p. 167. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1934.
  13. ^ Skinner, Roger Sherman (1830). The New-York State Register for 1830. New York, NY: Clayton & Van Norden. p. 365.
  14. ^ Duer, John; Butler, Benjamin F.; Spencer, John C. (1846). The Revised Statutes of the State of New-York. 1 (3 ed.). Albany, NY: Weare C. Little and Co. p. 338.
  15. ^ Cayuga County Historical Society (1908). History of Cayuga County, New York. Rochester, NY: John P. Smith Printing Company. p. 186.
  16. ^ Dictionary of American Biography, Vol. XIII, p. 167.
  17. ^ Noel M. Loomis, Wells Fargo, pp. 15–16, 113, 155. New York: Clarkson N. Potter, Inc.
  18. ^ Dictionary of American Biography, op. cit.
  19. ^ Loomis, pp. 42, 139.
  20. ^ Dictionary of American Biography, op. cit.
  21. ^ Loomis, pp. 189, 197.
  22. ^ Loomis, pp. 201, 212, 215.
  23. ^ Dictionary of American Biography, op. cit.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Thomas Y. Howe, Jr.
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 25th congressional district

March 4, 1853 – March 3, 1859
Succeeded by
Martin Butterfield
1854 United States House of Representatives elections in New York

The 1854 United States House of Representatives elections in New York were held on November 7, 1854, to elect 33 U.S. Representatives to represent the State of New York in the United States House of Representatives of the 34th United States Congress, and two representatives to fill vacancies in the 33rd United States Congress.

33rd United States Congress

The Thirty-third United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1853, to March 4, 1855, during the first two years of the administration of U.S. President Franklin Pierce. During this session, the Kansas–Nebraska Act was passed, an act that soon led to the creation of the Republican Party. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Seventh Census of the United States in 1850. Both chambers had a Democratic majority.

34th United States Congress

The Thirty-fourth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C., from March 4, 1855, to March 4, 1857, during the last two years of Franklin Pierce's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Seventh Census of the United States in 1850. The Whig Party, one of the two major parties of the era, had largely collapsed, although many former Whigs ran as Republicans or as members of the "Opposition Party." The Senate had a Democratic majority, and the House was controlled by a coalition of Representatives led by Nathaniel P. Banks, a member of the American Party.

35th United States Congress

The Thirty-fifth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1857, to March 4, 1859, during the first two years of James Buchanan's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Seventh Census of the United States in 1850. Both chambers had a Democratic majority.

Aurora, Cayuga County, New York

Aurora, or Aurora-on-Cayuga, is a village and college town in the town of Ledyard, Cayuga County, New York, United States, on the shore of Cayuga Lake. The village had a population of 724 at the 2010 census.Wells College, an institution of higher education for women founded by Henry Wells in 1868, is located in Aurora. It became coeducational in 2005, and since then enrollment has risen.

In 1980, its Aurora Village-Wells College Historic District, with more than 50 contributing properties, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. From 2001 to 2007, redevelopment of historic properties in the village by entrepreneur Pleasant Rowland and the Aurora Foundation earned compliments, as well as provoking citizen concern, a lawsuit joined by state and national preservation organizations, and national media attention.

Aurora Inn

The Aurora Inn was built in 1833 at Aurora, Cayuga County, New York for Edwin B. Morgan, a local businessman involved in trade and shipping on Cayuga Lake, one of the seven Finger Lakes. Aurora served as a port for shipping goods up the lake and through the Erie Canal to New York City and other major markets. Originally named Aurora House, the Aurora Inn was set on the shores of Cayuga Lake.

It is a contributing property in the Aurora Village-Wells College Historic District, listed on November 19, 1980 on the National Register of Historic Places.

Caning of Charles Sumner

The Caning of Charles Sumner, or the Brooks–Sumner Affair, occurred on May 22, 1856, in the United States Senate when Representative Preston Brooks (D-SC) used a walking cane to attack Senator Charles Sumner (R-MA), an abolitionist, in retaliation for a speech given by Sumner two days earlier in which he fiercely criticized slaveholders, including a relative of Brooks. The beating nearly killed Sumner and it drew a sharply polarized response from the American public on the subject of the expansion of slavery in the United States. It has been considered symbolic of the "breakdown of reasoned discourse" that eventually led to the American Civil War.

E. B. Morgan House

The E. B. Morgan House at 431 Main Street, Aurora, New York, was designed in the Italianate style by New York architect Joseph C. Wells for Edwin Barber Morgan, a wealthy entrepreneur and U.S. Congressman. Built between 1857 and 1858, the mansion expressed the new wealth of businessmen in Central New York. Their innovative companies had operations extending to California and the South. The mansion is a contributing property within the Aurora Village–Wells College Historic District, listed in 1980 on the National Register of Historic Places.

Edwin D. Morgan

Edwin Denison Morgan (February 8, 1811 – February 14, 1883) was the 21st Governor of New York from 1859 to 1862 and served in the United States Senate from 1863 to 1869. He was the first and longest-serving chairman of the Republican National Committee. He was also a Union Army general during the American Civil War.

A native of Massachusetts, Morgan was raised in Connecticut, trained as a merchant in Hartford, and served on the city council. He later moved to New York City, where he became a successful wholesale grocer and bond broker and served as an assistant alderman and member of the New York State Senate. Originally a Whig, he was one of the founders of the Republican Party, and he served as chairman of the Republican National Committee from 1856 to 1864 and 1872 to 1876.

In 1858, Morgan was elected Governor of New York, and he served from 1859 to 1862. As governor during the American Civil War, Morgan supported the Union. Appointed a major general of volunteers in the Union Army, he commanded the military's Department of New York while serving as governor. In 1863, he was elected to the United States Senate, where he served one term. He was an unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1869, and the unsuccessful Republican nominee for governor in 1876. Morgan had been a patron of Chester A. Arthur at the start of Arthur's career; when Arthur became president, he nominated Morgan as United States Secretary of the Treasury. Morgan was confirmed by the Senate, but declined on the grounds of age and ill health. Morgan died in New York City in 1883, and was buried in Connecticut.

Edwin Morgan

Edwin Morgan may refer to:

Edwin Morgan (poet) (1920–2010), Scottish poet

Edwin B. Morgan (1806–1881), U.S. Representative from New York

Edwin D. Morgan (1811–1883), New York governor and U.S. Senator

Edwin D. Morgan (businessman) (1921–2001), American director of the Pioneer Fund

Edwin Vernon Morgan (1865–1934), American diplomat and ambassador

George Jones (publisher)

George Jones (August 16, 1811 – August 11, 1891) was an American journalist who, with Henry Jarvis Raymond, co-founded the New-York Daily Times, now the New York Times

Henry Wells

Henry Wells (December 12, 1805 – December 10, 1878) was an American businessman important in the history of both the American Express Company and Wells Fargo & Company.

History of Wells Fargo

For a general overview of the activities of the current company see the main entry under Wells Fargo.This article outlines the history of Wells Fargo & Company from its origins to its merger with Norwest Corporation and beyond. The new company chose to retain the name of "Wells Fargo" and so this article also includes the history after the merger.

Martin Butterfield

Martin Butterfield (December 8, 1790 – August 6, 1866) was a United States Representative from New York.

Born in Westmoreland, New Hampshire, he attended the common schools, farmed, and was active in the Grafton Agricultural Society. In 1828 he moved to Palmyra, Wayne County, New York. He engaged in the hardware business and also in the manufacture of rope and cordage. Butterfield continued to farm, was active in Palmyra's Union Agricultural Society and served as its president.

He was active in the Episcopal Church, and was a delegate to diocese conventions and other meetings. In 1843 he was one of several Palmyra residents who signed a public letter stating that they personally knew Joseph Smith, and that in their view he was not trustworthy, and that his claims of religious visions and revelations leading to publication of the Book of Mormon should not be believed.

Butterfield was a presidential elector on the Whig ticket in 1848 and was elected as a Republican to the Thirty-sixth Congress, holding office from March 4, 1859 to March 3, 1861; he was chairman of the Committee on Agriculture.

Butterfield declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1860 and resumed his former business and agricultural pursuits. He died in Palmyra on August 6, 1866 and was buried Palmyra Cemetery.

New York's 25th congressional district

The 25th Congressional District of New York is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives. It is currently represented by Democrat Joseph D. Morelle. The district is now located entirely and exclusively within Monroe County, centered on the city of Rochester.

From 2003 to 2013 it stretched from Syracuse to the northeastern suburbs of Rochester. The district comprised all of Onondaga and Wayne counties, the northernmost portion of Cayuga County and the towns of Irondequoit, Penfield, and Webster in Monroe County. The district contained 100 miles of Lake Ontario shoreline, the easternmost Finger Lakes and significant portions of the Erie Canal.

Temple Rice Hollcroft

Temple Rice Hollcroft, Sr. (8 April 1889, Alton, Indiana – 1967) was an American mathematician and local historian.Hollcroft received B.S. in 1912 and A.B. in 1914 from Hanover College and then A.M. in 1915 from the University of Kentucky. He received in 1917 his Ph.D. from Cornell University under Virgil Snyder and during WW I served in France as a second lieutenant in the Field Artillery. Hollcroft was a mathematics professor at Wells College from 1918 to 1954, when he retired as professor emeritus. He served for 14 years as Associate Secretary of the American Mathematical Society. In 1932 in Zurich he was an Invited Speaker of the ICM, with talk The general web of surfaces and the space involution defined by it.

Hollcroft published 38 mathematical research papers, as well as many articles on local history. He held the position of Historian for Cayuga County, Town of Ledyard, and Wells College. Temple Hollcroft is buried with his wife Mary Piper Hollcroft at Oak Glen Cemetery, in Aurora, New York.

The Temple Rice Hollcroft Collection at Wells College contains documents related to the history of Wells College, Henry Wells, Edwin B. Morgan, Wells Fargo, and American Express. The collection also contains some Alonzo Delano papers, Henry Warner Slocum autograph letters, and miscellaneous documents related to the history of Cayuga County, New York.

The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as the NYT and NYTimes) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership. Founded in 1851, the paper has won 125 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper. The Times is ranked 17th in the world by circulation and 2nd in the U.S.

The paper is owned by The New York Times Company, which is publicly traded and is controlled by the Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure. It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G. Sulzberger, the paper's publisher, and his father, Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr., the company's chairman, are the fourth and fifth generation of the family to helm the paper.Nicknamed "The Gray Lady", the Times has long been regarded within the industry as a national "newspaper of record". The paper's motto, "All the News That's Fit to Print", appears in the upper left-hand corner of the front page.

Since the mid-1970s, The New York Times has greatly expanded its layout and organization, adding special weekly sections on various topics supplementing the regular news, editorials, sports, and features. Since 2008, the Times has been organized into the following sections: News, Editorials/Opinions-Columns/Op-Ed, New York (metropolitan), Business, Sports of The Times, Arts, Science, Styles, Home, Travel, and other features. On Sunday, the Times is supplemented by the Sunday Review (formerly the Week in Review), The New York Times Book Review, The New York Times Magazine and T: The New York Times Style Magazine. The Times stayed with the broadsheet full-page set-up and an eight-column format for several years after most papers switched to six, and was one of the last newspapers to adopt color photography, especially on the front page.

Thomas Y. Howe Jr.

Thomas Yardley Howe Jr. (August 15, 1808 – July 15, 1860) was a U.S. Representative from New York.

United States congressional delegations from New York

These are tables of congressional delegations from New York to the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

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