Edina Alves Batista

Edina Alves Batista (born 10 January 1980) is a Brazilian association football referee.[1]

Edina Alves Batista
Born 1 October 1980 (age 38)
Goioerê, Brazil
International
Years League Role
FIFA listed Referee

Career

She was an official at two games in April 2018 at the 2018 Copa América Femenina.

She officiated several matches at the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup including the semi-final between England and the United States.[2]

References

  1. ^ "Edina Alves Batista agora é FIFA, a notícia foi oficializada pela Confederação Brasileira de Futebol" (in Portuguese). goioere.cidadeportal.com.br. 16 December 2015. Retrieved 2 July 2019.
  2. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019 - List of match officials" (PDF).
2016 Copa Libertadores Femenina

The 2016 Copa Libertadores Femenina was the eighth edition of the Copa Libertadores Femenina, South America's premier women's club football tournament organized by CONMEBOL. The tournament was played in Uruguay from 6 to 20 December 2016.In the first final without a team from Brazil, Paraguayan team Sportivo Limpeño won their first title against Estudiantes de Guárico from Venezuela.

2017 Algarve Cup

The 2017 Algarve Cup was the 24th edition of the Algarve Cup, an invitational women's football tournament held annually in Portugal. It took place from 1 to 8 March.

2017 Copa Libertadores Femenina

The 2017 Copa CONMEBOL Libertadores Femenina was the ninth edition of the CONMEBOL Libertadores Femenina (also referred to as the Copa Libertadores Femenina), South America's premier women's club football tournament organized by CONMEBOL. The tournament was hosted in Paraguay from 7 to 21 October 2017.Sportivo Limpeño were the defending champions, but they were eliminated in the group stage.

2018 Copa América Femenina

The 2018 Copa América Femenina was the eighth edition of the CONMEBOL Copa América Femenina (also referred to as the Copa América Femenina), the quadrennial international football competition for women's national teams in South America affiliated with CONMEBOL. The tournament was played between 4 and 22 April 2018 in Chile.The tournament provided two direct qualifying places and a play-off place (against the fourth-placed team from CONCACAF) for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France, one direct qualifying place and a play-off place (against the second-placed team from CAF) for the 2020 Summer Olympic women's football tournament in Japan, and three (teams finishing third to fifth) for the 2019 Pan American Games women's football tournament in Lima, besides Peru who qualified automatically as hosts.Brazil defended successfully their title winning all their matches. It was their seventh Copa América Femenina title.

2018 Copa Libertadores Femenina

The 2018 Copa CONMEBOL Libertadores Femenina was the tenth edition of the CONMEBOL Libertadores Femenina (also referred to as the Copa Libertadores Femenina), South America's premier women's club football tournament organized by CONMEBOL. The tournament was held in Manaus, Brazil from 18 November to 2 December 2018.Originally planned from 4 to 18 November the tournament was pushed back two weeks because of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification CONCACAF–CONMEBOL play-off which fell in the time frame.Atlético Huila defeated Santos in the final on penalties to win their first tournament title. Iranduba defeated Colo-Colo to finish third.

Audax were the defending champions, having won the title the previous year as a joint team with Corinthians. They were eliminated in the group stage.

2018 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup

The 2018 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup was the ninth edition of the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup, the biennial international women's youth football championship contested by the under-20 national teams of the member associations of FIFA, since its inception in 2002 as the FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship (age limit was raised from 19 to 20 in 2006).

The tournament was held in Brittany, France between 5 and 24 August 2018, who would also host the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. Haiti and the Netherlands made their U-20 Women's World Cup debuts. North Korea were the defending champions but were eliminated by host France in the quarter-finals.

The final took place at Stade de la Rabine, Vannes between Spain and Japan, a rematch from the group stage. Japan won their first title, beating Spain 3–1 in the Final.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was the eighth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship contested by 24 women's national teams representing member associations of FIFA. It took place between 7 June and 7 July 2019, with 52 matches staged in nine cities in France, which was awarded the right to host the event in March 2015, the first time the country hosted the tournament. The tournament was the first Women's World Cup to use the video assistant referee (VAR) system.

The United States entered the competition as defending champions after winning the 2015 edition in Canada and successfully defended their title with a 2–0 victory over the Netherlands in the final. In doing so, they secured their record fourth title and became the second nation, after Germany, to have successfully retained the title.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup Group B

Group B of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup took place from 8 to 17 June 2019. The group consisted of China PR, Germany, South Africa and Spain. The top two teams, Germany and Spain, along with the third-placed team, China PR (as one of the four best third-placed teams), advanced to the round of 16.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup knockout stage

The knockout stage of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was the second and final stage of the competition, following the group stage. It began on 22 June with the round of 16 and ended on 7 July with the final match, held at the Parc Olympique Lyonnais in Décines-Charpieu. A total of 16 teams (the top two teams from each group, along with the four best third-placed teams) advanced to the knockout stage to compete in a single-elimination style tournament.All times listed are local, CEST (UTC+2).

2019 in American soccer

The 2019 season is the 107th season of competitive soccer in the United States.

2019–20 in English football

The 2019–20 season is the 140th season of competitive association football in England.

Batista

Batista is a Spanish or Portuguese surname (although in Portuguese more common in the spelling Baptista), literally meaning "batiste". It is also used as a middle name.

Notable persons with the name include:

Edina Alves Batista, Brazilian association football referee

Eike Batista, Brazilian mining magnate

Fulgencio Batista, Cuban general and president

Miguel Batista, Major League Baseball pitcher

Sergio Batista, Argentine former football player, now coach

Tony Batista, professional baseball player

William Batista, Brazilian footballer

Batista (footballer, born 1995), Brazilian football player

João Batista da Silva (athlete), Brazilian sprinter in athletics at the 1984 Summer Olympics – men's 4 × 400 metres relay

Dave Bautista, American professional wrestler and actor known by his ring name BatistaFictionalAngel Batista, a character in Dexter

Edina

Edina may refer to:

Edina, Liberia

Edina, Minnesota

Edina, Missouri

Edinburgh, as referred to by Scots poets

The Komenda/Edina/Eguafo/Abirem District in Ghana

EDINA, the JISC-funded UK data centreEdina is also a (female) given name. See

Name days in Hungary (February 26)

Edina Alves Batista, Brazilian association football referee

Edina Monsoon, a character in Absolutely Fabulous, played by Jennifer Saunders

England women's national football team

The England women's national football team has been governed by the Football Association (FA) since 1993, having been previously administered by the Women's Football Association (WFA). England played its first international match in November 1972 against Scotland. Although most national football teams represent a sovereign state, as a member of the United Kingdom's Home Nations, England is permitted by FIFA statutes to maintain its own national side that competes in all major tournaments, with the exception of the Women's Olympic Football Tournament.

England have qualified for the FIFA Women's World Cup five times, reaching the quarter-finals on three occasions; in 1995, 2007, and 2011, finishing third in 2015 and fourth in 2019. They reached the final of the UEFA Women's Championship in 1984 and 2009.

Italy at the FIFA Women's World Cup

Italy have participated three times at the FIFA Women's World Cup: in the inaugural edition of 1991, in 1999 and in 2019.While the men's senior team have won the FIFA World Cup four times, the women's team is yet to win a single edition. Italy participated in the inaugural World Cup of 1991 where, after two wins and a loss in the group stage, they qualified for the quarter-finals, where they lost against Norway. After having failed to qualify for the second edition, Italy played in the 1999 edition where they didn't go past the group stages. For the following four editions, between 2003 and 2015, Italy failed to qualify for the World Cup, coming close in 2015 after losing in the final match of qualification to Belgium.

In 2019, Italy returned to the World Cup after a 20-year absence. With two wins and a defeat, Italy topped their group and progressed to the round of 16, where they beat China 2–0. However, their World Cup journey came to an end as they were defeated 2–0 by the Netherlands in the quarter-finals.

Italy women's national football team

The Italy women's national football team (Italian: Nazionale di calcio femminile dell'Italia) has represented Italy in international women's football since their inception in 1968. The team is controlled by the Italian Football Federation (FIGC), the governing body for football in Italy.

Formed in 1968, Italy took part in various unofficial international tournaments, hosting the first unofficial European Competition in 1969 and World Cup in 1970. Italy qualified for both the first World Cup in 1991, where they reached the quarter-finals, and the first European Championship. While Italy were runners-up in the European Championship in 1993 and 1997, they are yet to replicate similar success at the World Cup. In 2019, after a 20-year drought, Italy qualified for the World Cup where they equaled their previous best performance, reaching the quarter-finals.

Netherlands women's national football team

The Netherlands women's national football team (Dutch: Nederlands vrouwenvoetbalelftal) is directed by the Royal Dutch Football Association (KNVB), which is a member of UEFA and FIFA.

In 1971, the team played the first women's international football match recognized by FIFA against France. They have played at the final tournament of the 2009, 2013, and 2017 UEFA Women's Championship and were champions in 2017. They have played at the final tournament of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time, and reached thirteenth place. They have also played at the final tournament in the 2019 edition, losing 2-0 the final against the United States.

The nicknames for the team are Oranje (Orange) and Leeuwinnen (Lionesses). Sarina Wiegman has been head coach since January 2017. As of July 2019, the team is ranked number 3 in the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

New Zealand women's national football team

The New Zealand women's national football team, nicknamed the Football Ferns, is governed by New Zealand Football (NZF). The New Zealand national team qualified for the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup, held in China in September 2007, sending the team to their first World Cup in 16 years, and the second since their 1975 debut in international competition.

Spain at the FIFA Women's World Cup

The Spain women's national football team has represented Spain at the FIFA Women's World Cup on two occasions, in 2015 and 2019.

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