Edgar Bennett

Edgar Bennett III (born February 15, 1969) is an American football coach and former running back who is the wide receivers coach for the Oakland Raiders of the National Football League (NFL). He previously was the offensive coordinator for the Green Bay Packers. Bennett played college football at Florida State and was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the 4th round of the 1992 NFL Draft. He also played for the Chicago Bears.

Edgar Bennett
refer to caption
Bennett signing autographs in 2008
Oakland Raiders
Position:Wide receivers coach
Personal information
Born:February 15, 1969 (age 50)
Jacksonville, Florida
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:218 lb (99 kg)
Career information
High school:Jacksonville (FL) Lee
College:Florida State
NFL Draft:1992 / Round: 4 / Pick: 103
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Rushing attempts:1,115
Rushing yards:3,992
Rushing touchdowns:21
Receptions:284
Receiving yards:2,245
Receiving touchdowns:10
Player stats at NFL.com
Coaching stats at PFR

Early years

Bennett attended Robert E. Lee High School in Jacksonville, Florida and won varsity letters in football, basketball, and track. Influenced by football coach Corky Rogers, he was a Class 4A All-State running back, and was a SuperPrep All-Dixie selection.

Playing career

College

Bennett attended Florida State University. He lined up primarily at fullback in a backfield that included future NFL running backs Amp Lee, Marquette Smith, William Floyd, Zach Crockett and Sean Jackson. When Lee was suspended for the Cotton Bowl, Bennett started at halfback. Bennett is considered one of the most versatile fullbacks in FSU history. His career all-purpose yardage totaled more than 2,300 on 389 touches, good for 20 touchdowns. He was an all-around player who ran a 4.5 40 and caught 93 passes for over 1,000 yards.[1]

National Football League

Green Bay Packers

Bennett was drafted in the 4th round (103rd overall) by the Packers in the 1992 NFL Draft. Bennett started his Packer career as a fullback, but he became the starting running back in 1995 and gained 1,067 yards rushing. As both a fullback and a running back, Bennett excelled as a receiver leading the Packers in receptions. He continued as the starting running back throughout the 1996 season, but in the latter half, Dorsey Levens was receiving significant playing time at running back. Bennett's career as a Packer culminated in their Super Bowl XXXI victory. He ruptured his Achilles tendon in the 1997 preseason and did not play that year.

Chicago Bears

Bennett played with the Chicago Bears in 1998 and 1999 before retiring after the 1999 season.

Statistics

Note: G = Games played; Att = Rushing attempts; Yds = Rushing yards; Avg = Average yards per carry; Long = Longest rush; Rush TD = Rushing touchdowns; Rec = Receptions; Yds = Receiving yards; Avg = Average yards per reception; Long = Longest reception; Rec TD = Receiving touchdowns

Year Team GP Att Yds Avg Long Rush TD Rec Yds Avg Long Rec TD
1992 Green Bay Packers 16 61 214 3.5 18 0 13 93 7.2 22 0
1993 Green Bay Packers 16 159 550 3.5 19 9 59 457 7.7 39 1
1994 Green Bay Packers 16 178 623 3.5 39 5 78 546 7.0 40 4
1995 Green Bay Packers 16 316 1,067 3.4 23 3 61 648 10.6 35 4
1996 Green Bay Packers 16 222 899 4.0 23 2 31 176 5.7 25 1
1997 Did Not Play-Injured
1998 Chicago Bears 16 173 611 3.5 43 2 28 209 7.5 31 0
1999 Chicago Bears 16 6 28 4.7 15 0 14 116 8.3 34 0
Career Totals 112 1,115 3,992 3.6 43 21 284 2,245 7.9 40 10
  • Stats that are highlighted show career high

Coaching career

Green Bay Packers

Bennett rejoined the Packer organization in 2001 as director of player development. He later served as running backs coach for six seasons. In February 2011, Bennett was named wide receivers coach.[2] In February 2015, Packers head coach Mike McCarthy promoted Bennett to offensive coordinator.

Oakland Raiders

On January 13, 2018, Bennett was hired by the Oakland Raiders as their wide receivers coach under head coach Jon Gruden.

Coaching tree

NFL head coaches under whom Edgar Bennett has served:

References

  1. ^ http://nolefan.org/football/bennett_edgar.html
  2. ^ Packers announce offensive coaching staff changes

External links

1991 Florida State Seminoles football team

The 1991 Florida State Seminoles football team represented Florida State University in the 1991 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by Bobby Bowden and played their home games at Doak Campbell Stadium. This was Florida State's final season as an independent; it joined the Atlantic Coast Conference the following season.

Florida State finished the season ranked #4 in both polls. They started the season ranked at the top of the polls, but were dropped in the rankings after Wide Right I. The Seminoles offense scored 449 points while the defense allowed 188 points. After the completion of the regular season, they competed in the Cotton Bowl Classic.

Quarterback Casey Weldon was runner-up for the Heisman Trophy.

1992 Green Bay Packers season

The 1992 Green Bay Packers season was their 74th season overall and their 72nd in the National Football League. The club posted a 9–7 record under new coach Mike Holmgren, earning them a second-place finish in the NFC Central division. 1992 saw the emergence of QB Brett Favre and the start of the Packers' success of the 1990s.

Bob Monnett

Robert C. Monnett (February 27, 1910 – August 2, 1978) was a professional American football player who played halfback for six seasons for the Green Bay Packers. He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1973.

Charley Brock

Charles Jacob "Charley" Brock (March 15, 1916 – May 25, 1987) was an American football center and linebacker.

Dorsey Levens

Herbert Dorsey Levens (born May 21, 1970) is a retired American football running back in the National Football League. He was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the fifth round (149th overall) of the 1994 NFL Draft. He helped the Packers win the Vince Lombardi Trophy in Super Bowl XXXI against the New England Patriots. He played college football at Notre Dame and later Georgia Tech.

In his career, Levens also played for the Philadelphia Eagles and New York Giants. While playing for the Packers, he rushed for 1,000 or more yards twice and was selected to the Pro Bowl after the 1997 season.

Edgar Bennett (English footballer)

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Hank Gremminger

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Ken Bennett (association footballer)

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LeRoy Butler

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Super Bowl XXXI

Super Bowl XXXI was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion New England Patriots and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Green Bay Packers to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1996 season. The Packers defeated the Patriots by the score of 35–21, earning their third overall Super Bowl victory, and their first since Super Bowl II. The Packers also extended their league record for the most overall NFL championships to 12. It was also the last in a run of 13 straight Super Bowl victories by the NFC over the AFC. The game was played on January 26, 1997 at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana.

This Super Bowl featured two clubs that had recently returned to competitiveness. After 24 mostly dismal seasons since Vince Lombardi left, the Packers' fortunes turned after head coach Mike Holmgren and quarterback Brett Favre joined the team in 1992. After four losing seasons, the Patriots' rise began in 1993 when Bill Parcells was hired as head coach, and the team drafted quarterback Drew Bledsoe. Under their respective head coaches and quarterbacks, Green Bay posted an NFC-best 13–3 regular season record in 1996, while New England advanced to their second Super Bowl after recording an 11–5 record.

The game began with the teams combining for 24 first-quarter points, the most in Super Bowl history. The Packers then scored 17 unanswered points in the second quarter, including Favre's then-Super Bowl record 81-yard touchdown pass to wide receiver Antonio Freeman. In the third quarter, the Patriots cut the lead to 27–21 off of running back Curtis Martin's 18-yard rushing touchdown. But on the ensuing kickoff, Desmond Howard returned the ball a then-Super Bowl record 99 yards for a touchdown. The score proved to be the last one, as both teams' defenses took over the rest of the game. Howard became the first special teams player ever to be named Super Bowl MVP. He gained a total of 154 kickoff return yards, and also recorded a then-Super Bowl record 90 punt return yards, thus tying the then-Super Bowl records of total return yards (244) and combined net yards gained (244).

This was the first Super Bowl broadcast by Fox under its first contract to carry NFL games. By a large margin it was the highest-rated program aired in the network's history at the time.

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