Edgar Award

The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (popularly called the Edgars), named after Edgar Allan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America,[1] based in New York City.[2] They honor the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction, television, film, and theater published or produced in the previous year.

Categories

Best Novel award winners

Winners and, where known, shortlisted titles for each year:

1950s

1954 Charlotte Jay, Beat Not the Bones
1955 Raymond Chandler, The Long Goodbye
1956 Margaret Millar, Beast in View
1957 Charlotte Armstrong, A Dram of Poison
1958 Ed Lacy, Room to Swing
1959 Stanley Ellin, The Eighth Circle

1960s

1960 Celia Fremlin, The Hours Before Dawn
1961 Julian Symons, The Progress of a Crime
1962 J. J. Marric, Gideon's Fire
1963 Ellis Peters, Death and the Joyful Woman
1964 Eric Ambler, The Light of Day
  • Stanton Forbes, Grieve for the Past
  • Dorothy B. Hughes, The Expendable Man
  • Elizabeth Fenwick, The Make-Believe Man
  • Ellery Queen, The Player on the Other Side
1965 John le Carré, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold
1966 Adam Hall, The Quiller Memorandum
1967 Nicolas Freeling, King of the Rainy Country
1968 Donald E. Westlake, God Save the Mark
1969 "Jeffery Hudson" (Michael Crichton), A Case of Need

1970s

1970 Dick Francis, Forfeit
1971 Maj Sjöwall & Per Wahlöö, The Laughing Policeman
1972 Frederick Forsyth, The Day of the Jackal
1973 Warren Kiefer, The Lingala Code
1974 Tony Hillerman, Dance Hall of the Dead
1975 Jon Cleary, Peter's Pence
1976 Brian Garfield, Hopscotch
1977 Robert B. Parker, Promised Land
1978 William Hallahan, Catch Me: Kill Me
1979 Ken Follett, Eye of the Needle

1980s

1980 Arthur Maling, The Rheingold Route [3]
1981 Dick Francis, Whip Hand
1982 William Bayer, Peregrine
1983 Rick Boyer, Billingsgate Shoal
1984 Elmore Leonard, La Brava
1985 Ross Thomas, Briarpatch
1986 L. R. Wright, The Suspect
1987 Barbara Vine, A Dark-Adapted Eye
1988 Aaron Elkins, Old Bones
1989 Stuart M. Kaminsky, A Cold Red Sunrise

1990s

1990 James Lee Burke, Black Cherry Blues
1991 Julie Smith, New Orleans Mourning
1992 Lawrence Block, A Dance at the Slaughterhouse
1993 Margaret Maron, Bootlegger's Daughter
1994 Minette Walters, The Sculptress
1995 Mary Willis Walker, The Red Scream
1996 Dick Francis, Come to Grief
1997 Thomas H. Cook, The Chatham School Affair
1998 James Lee Burke, Cimarron Rose
1999 Robert Clark, Mr. White's Confession

2000s

2000 Jan Burke, Bones
2001 Joe R. Lansdale, The Bottoms
2002 T. Jefferson Parker, Silent Joe
2003 S. J. Rozan, Winter and Night
2004 Ian Rankin, Resurrection Men
2005 T. Jefferson Parker, California Girl
2006 Jess Walter, Citizen Vince
2007 Jason Goodwin, The Janissary Tree
2008 John Hart, Down River
2009 C. J. Box, Blue Heaven

2010s

2010 John Hart, The Last Child
2011 Steve Hamilton, The Lock Artist
2012 Mo Hayder, Gone
2013 Dennis Lehane, Live by Night
2014 William Kent Krueger, Ordinary Grace
2015 Stephen King, Mr. Mercedes
2016 Lori Roy, Let Me Die in His Footsteps
2017 Noah Hawley, Before the Fall
2018 Attica Locke, Bluebird, Bluebird

1972 winners

2010 winners

The Edgar Allan Poe Awards 2010, honoring the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction, television, and film published or produced in 2009, are:

The Robert L. Fish Memorial Award was presented to "A Dreadful Day" – Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine by Dan Warthman (Dell Magazines).[4]

2012 winners

For works published in 2011.

2013 winners

2014 winners

2015 winners

2016 winners

2017 winners

  • Best Novel: Before the Fall by Noah Hawley
  • Best First Novel: Under the Harrow by Flynn Berry
  • Best Paperback Original: Rain Dogs by Adrian McKinty
  • Best Fact Crime: The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child Murderer by Kate Summerscale
  • Best Critical/Biographical: Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life by Ruth Franklin
  • Best Short Story: "Autumn at the Automat" – from the collection In Sunlight or in Shadow by Lawrence Block
  • Best Juvenile: OCDaniel by Wesley King
  • Best Young Adult: Girl in the Blue Coat by Monica Hesse
  • Best Television Episode Teleplay: "A Blade of Grass" - Penny Dreadful by John Logan
  • Robert L. Fish Memorial Award: "The Truth of the Moment" – Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine by E. Gabriel Flores
  • Mary Higgins Clark Award: The Shattered Tree by Charles Todd
  • Grand Master: Max Allan Collins, Ellen Hart
  • Raven Award: Dru Ann Love
  • Ellery Queen Award: Neil Nyren

2018 winners

See also

References

  1. ^ Neimeyer, Mark. "Poe and Popular Culture", collected in The Cambridge Companion to Edgar Allan Poe. Cambridge University Press, 2002. ISBN 0-521-79727-6. p. 206.
  2. ^ "Contact the National Office of Mystery Writers of America". Retrieved 2013-04-21.
  3. ^ "Edgar Award Winners and Nominees Database". Theedgars.com. Retrieved 2012-01-30.
  4. ^ 2010 Edgar Winners Press Release
  5. ^ a b "2013 Nominees". Retrieved July 23, 2013.
  6. ^ a b "MWA Announces 2014 Grand Master and Raven Awards". mysterywriters.org. Retrieved January 25, 2014.

External links

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