Eddie Lacy

Edward Darwin Lacy Jr. (born June 2, 1990) is a former American football running back. He played college football at Alabama, where he was a member of three BCS National Championship teams in the 2009, 2011, and 2012 seasons. He was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the second round of the 2013 NFL Draft. He was also a member of the Seattle Seahawks.

Eddie Lacy
refer to caption
Lacy with the Green Bay Packers in 2015
No. 27
Position:Running back
Personal information
Born:June 2, 1990 (age 28)
Gretna, Louisiana
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:250 lb (113 kg)
Career information
High school:Dutchtown
(Geismar, Louisiana)
College:Alabama
NFL Draft:2013 / Round: 2 / Pick: 61
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of 2018
Rushing yards:3,614
Yards per carry:4.2
Rushing touchdowns:23
Receptions:107
Receiving yards:937
Receiving touchdowns:6
Player stats at NFL.com

High school career

Lacy attended and graduated from Dutchtown High School in Geismar, Louisiana, where he played high school football for the Griffins.[1] He ran for 1,207 yards and 13 touchdowns as a sophomore, 34 touchdowns as a junior, and one touchdown during his injury-plagued senior season.[2] In December 2008, he was selected by the Louisiana Sports Writers Association as a first-team player on the Class 5A All-State football team for the second consecutive season.[3][4] Rated as the 13th best running back and the 116th best prospect overall by Rivals.com,[5] Lacy committed to the University of Alabama in February 2009.[6][7][8]

US college sports recruiting information for high school athletes
Name Hometown High school / college Height Weight 40 Commit date
Eddie Lacy
RB
Gretna, Louisiana Dutchtown High School 5 ft 10.5 in (1.79 m) 225 lb (102 kg) 4.6 Feb 4, 2009 
Recruiting star ratings: Scout:
4 stars
   Rivals:
4 stars
   247Sports:
4 stars
   ESPN grade: 81
Overall recruiting rankings: Scout: 24 (RB)   Rivals: 13 (RB)  247Sports: 13 (RB)  ESPN: 17 (RB)
  • Note: In many cases, Scout, Rivals, 247Sports, and ESPN may conflict in their listings of height and weight.
  • In these cases, the average was taken. ESPN grades are on a 100-point scale.

Sources:

  • "2009 Alabama Football Commits". Scout.com. Retrieved April 23, 2013.
  • "Alabama Crimson Tide". ESPN.com. Retrieved April 23, 2013.
  • "Scout.com Team Recruiting Rankings". Scout.com. Retrieved April 23, 2013.

College career

Lacy was a highly touted recruit coming out of Dutchtown High School. He accepted an athletic scholarship to attend the University of Alabama, where he played for coach Nick Saban's Alabama Crimson Tide football team from 2009 to 2012.[9] Lacy won three BCS National Championships with the Crimson Tide in his collegiate career.[10]

2009 season

With the Crimson Tide having a lot of depth at the running back position, including future NFL running backs Mark Ingram and Trent Richardson, Lacy was redshirted for his freshman year.[11]

2010 season

In 2010, Lacy earned his spot as the third-string tailback behind Ingram and Richardson.[12] In the season opener against San Jose State, Lacy ran for 113 yards and two touchdowns in his collegiate debut.[13][14][15] For the 2010 season, He finished with 406 yards rushing on 56 carries, an average of 7.25 yards per carry, and six touchdowns.[16][17][18]

2011 season

Eddie Lacy and AJ McCarron 09-24-11
Lacy (left) with quarterback AJ McCarron versus Arkansas

With Ingram departing for the NFL, Richardson and Lacy advanced to the No. 1 and No. 2 running back spots for the 2011 Alabama Crimson Tide football team. In the pre-season, those close to the program opined that "the Richardson-Eddie Lacy duo may put up bigger and better numbers and go down as the best duo in recent history."[19] Backfield partner Richardson told reporters that Lacy's spin move is what separates him from other backs: "It's the nastiest spin move ever."[20] The move has earned Lacy the nickname "Circle Button" based on the button on PlayStation's video games that triggers a spin move.[21][22] Aaron Suttles of The Tuscaloosa News wrote, "To the fans, Eddie Lacy is a dreadlocked blur, spinning past defenders into the secondary. To his teammates, he's affectionately known as 'Circle Button.'"[23][24]

In the 2011 season opener against Kent State, Lacy contributed 134 yards of offense, which were 76 receiving yards on three catches and 58 rushing yards on eight carries (an average of 7.3 yards per rushing carry).[25] His 48-yard gain on a screen pass was the longest passing play of the game. Asked in a post-game press conference if he had hit the "Circle Button" a few times in the game, Lacy joked, "Yeah, I did a few spin moves."[26] The Birmingham News wrote that Lacy "ran more impressively" against Kent State than the Crimson Tide's No. 1 running back, Trent Richardson.[27] Another commentator led his coverage of the Kent State game with the headline, "Lacy, not Richardson, has look of Heisman-caliber RB in game one."[28] After the game, head coach Nick Saban noted, "Eddie's a fast guy, an explosive guy."[28] Photographs of Lacy hurdling over Kent State defensive back Calvin Tiggle were published in news outlets across the United States and in Europe,[29][30][31] with one such image being chosen by Yahoo Sports as its lead "Photo of the Day."[32]

In the second game of the 2011 season, Lacy rushed for 85 yards in Alabama's 27–11 win over Penn State.[33]

In the third week, Lacy had the best game of his collegiate career, rushing for 161 yards and two touchdowns on nine carries against North Texas.[34][35] His 67-yard touchdown sprint in the fourth quarter was picked as Alabama's Play of the Week.[36]

Against Arkansas, Lacy rushed for 61 yards and one touchdown on 13 carries.[37][38] He sustained a foot injury against SEC West rival Arkansas and did not play the following week against Vanderbilt.[39]

Alabama Crimson Tide football on offense against Western Carolina
Lacy in the backfield

During the 2011 regular season, Lacy had 631 rushing yards and seven touchdowns.[40] His average of 7.5 yards per carry ranked sixth among all players in the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision.[41]

2012 season

In 2012, he became the starting running back for Alabama after the departure of Trent Richardson to the NFL. His backup was true freshman T. J. Yeldon and both He and Yeldon finished the year with over 1,000 yards each.[42] In the Arkansas game, he had 55 rushing yards and three rushing touchdowns.[43] Against Missouri, he had 177 rushing yards and three rushing touchdowns.[44] In the Iron Bowl against Auburn, he had 131 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns in the victory.[45] He finished the 2012 season rushing for 181 yards and two touchdowns in the 2012 SEC Championship Game and 140 yards and one rushing touchdown, as well as one receiving touchdown in the 2013 BCS Championship Game against Notre Dame.[46][47] He was named the Offensive MVP for the BCS Championship game. Lacy finished the year with 1,322 rushing yards with 17 rushing touchdowns and two receiving touchdowns.[48] On January 11, 2013, he decided to forego his final year and declared for the 2013 NFL Draft.[49]

Statistics

Rushing Receiving
Year Team GP Att Yards Avg TDs Rec Yards TDs
2010 Alabama 12 56 406 7.3 6 2 18 0
2011 Alabama 12 95 674 7.1 7 11 131 0
2012 Alabama 14 204 1,322 6.5 17 22 189 2
College Totals 38 355 2,402 6.8 30 35 338 2
Source: sports-reference.com

Professional career

Lacy was one of the top running back prospects in the 2013 NFL Draft,[50] with a reputation for agility, strength, and ability to run through tackles.[51]

External video
Lacy gets drafted by Green Bay
Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt Arm length Hand size 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad Wonderlic
5 ft 11 in
(1.80 m)
231 lb
(105 kg)
31 in
(0.79 m)
9 12 in
(0.24 m)
4.64 s 1.65 s 2.65 s 7.33 s 33.5 in
(0.85 m)
17[52]
All values are from NFL Combine, except 40, cone drill, and vertical from Pro Day[53][54]
Eddie Lacy 2014 Pro Bowl
Lacy playing in the 2014 Pro Bowl after his rookie season.

Green Bay Packers

2013 season

Lacy was selected in the second round (61st overall) by the Green Bay Packers in the 2013 NFL Draft.[55] He was the fourth running back to be selected in the 2013 NFL Draft.[56] In addition, he was the fourth of nine Alabama players to be selected that year. On May 30, 2013, he signed a contract with the Packers.[57]

Lacy made his NFL debut against the San Francisco 49ers and had 41 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown.[58] He suffered a concussion against Washington Redskins on September 15, 2013.[59] He returned against the Detroit Lions on October 6, 2013.[60] He later rushed for 100+ yards in four games. He had a career-high in rushing in a single game against the Chicago Bears, running for 150 yards on 22 carries with a 6.8 average.[61] Lacy passed the 1,000-yd season mark on December 15 against the Dallas Cowboys when he ran for 141 yards and a touchdown on 21 carries.[62] Lacy finished the season with an impressive 1,178 yards and 11 touchdowns with 257 receiving yards. He set the Packer rookie records for most rushing yards and touchdowns in a season.[63] He was named AP-Second Team All-Pro and was named to the NFC Pro Bowl.[64] The Packers made the playoffs with an 8–7–1 record.[65] In the Wild Card Round against the San Francisco 49ers, he had 81 rushing yards in the 23–20 loss.[66]

Lacy was selected as the 2013 Offensive Rookie of The Year, the first Packer chosen for the award since running back John Brockington in 1971.[67] He a was also the Packers' first 1,000 yard rusher since Ryan Grant in 2009.[68]

2014 season

Eddie Lacy 2014 training camp (cropped)
Lacy during the 2014 August training camp.

The Packers 2014 season opener was against the defending champion Seattle Seahawks where Lacy had 12 carries for 34 yards and three receptions for 11 yards.[69][70] Lacy sustained a concussion during the game and left the game in the second half.[69] During the game, Lacy wore the new SpeedFlex helmet by Riddell, which claims that the helmet absorbs impact force better due to the helmet's greater flexibility.[69] Lacy had his first 100-yard game of the season in the fifth game of the season against the Minnesota Vikings, where he had 13 carries for 105 yards, two touchdowns, and also had three receptions for 27 yards in a 42–10 Packers win.[71] In the second matchup against the Vikings, he had 125 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown to go along with two receptions for 13 yards and a receiving touchdown.[72] In the season finale against the Detroit Lions, he had his third game of the season with at least 100 rushing yards.[73]

After a slow start to the season, Lacy finished strong, ending the season with 1,139 yards rushing, with nine rushing touchdowns, averaging 4.6 yards per carry. Lacy became only the second Packer ever to rush for over 1,000 yards in his first two NFL seasons, joining John Brockington. In addition, Lacy caught 42 passes for 427 yards and four touchdowns.[74]

The Packers earned a first-round bye for the playoffs.[75] In the Divisional Round against the Dallas Cowboys, Lacy had 101 rushing yards in the 26–21 victory.[76] In the NFC Championship, against the Seattle Seahawks, he had 73 rushing yards in the 28–22 overtime defeat.[77]

2015 season

Lacy started the 2015 season with 85 rushing yards and a touchdown in a victory over the Chicago Bears.[78] On September 20, he left Week 2's game against the Seattle Seahawks with an ankle injury and did not return. X-rays were negative on Lacy’s injured ankle.[79] The injury was classified as "minor."[80] On November 8, Lacy left during the 3rd quarter with a groin injury in Week 9's game against the Carolina Panthers.[81] On November 10, the Packers declared Lacy inactive for Week 10's matchup against the Detroit Lions.[82] On December 2, Lacy missed the Packers' team curfew and his status was impacted for Week 13's matchup against the Detroit Lions.[83] On December 13, he had 124 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown in the 28–7 win over the Dallas Cowboys.[84] Overall, in the 2015 season, he finished with 758 rushing yards, three rushing touchdowns, 20 receptions, 188 receiving yards, and two receiving touchdowns.[85]

The Packers made the playoffs and faced off against the Washington Redskins in the Wild Card Round.[86] In the 35–18 victory, Lacy had 63 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown.[87] In the Divisional Round against the Arizona Cardinals, he had 89 rushing yards in the 26–20 overtime loss.[88]

2016 season

Lacy started the 2016 season with 61 rushing yards in a 27–23 victory over the Jacksonville Jaguars.[89] On October 11, he injured his ankle in a Sunday Night Football game against the New York Giants. He had 81 yards on 11 carries before exiting the game.[90][91] He was placed on injured reserve on October 20, 2016.[92] He started the first five games of the season, rushing for 360 yards on 71 attempts with no touchdowns and averaged a career-high 5.1 yards per carry in the 2016 season.[93][94]

Seattle Seahawks

On March 14, 2017, Lacy signed a one-year, $5.5 million contract with the Seattle Seahawks with $3 million guaranteed.[95][96] He was offered similar contracts from the Packers and Minnesota Vikings before ultimately choosing to sign with Seattle.[97] On June 12, 2017, Lacy passed his latest weigh-in, which required him to be 250 pounds or less. He made $55,000 as part of his contract.[98]

Lacy struggled in the 2017 season due to a crowded backfield.[99] On September 10, in his Seahawks debut, He had five rushes for three yards in a 17–9 loss to his former team, the Green Bay Packers.[100] Overall, he finished the 2017 season with 179 rushing yards and six receptions for 47 yards.[101]

NFL career statistics

Regular season

Year Team G GS Rushing Receiving Fumbles
Att Yds Avg Lng TD Rec Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
Regular season
2013 GB 15 15 284 1,178 4.1 60 11 35 257 7.3 34 0 1 1
2014 GB 16 16 246 1,139 4.6 44 9 42 427 10.2 67 4 3 2
2015 GB 15 12 187 758 4.1 29 3 20 188 9.4 28 2 4 2
2016 GB 5 5 71 360 5.1 31 0 4 28 7.0 17 0 0 0
2017 SEA 9 3 69 179 2.6 19 0 6 47 7.8 14 0 0 0
Total 60 51 857 3,614 4.2 60 23 107 937 8.9 67 6 8 5
Source: NFL.com

Postseason

Year Team G GS Rushing Receiving Fumbles
Att Yds Avg Lng TD Rec Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
2013 GB 1 1 21 81 3.9 8 0 2 7 3.5 4 0 0 0
2014 GB 2 2 40 174 4.4 29 0 1 10 10.0 10 0 0 0
2015 GB 2 2 24 152 6.3 61 1 2 2 1.0 4 0 1 1
Total 5 5 85 407 4.8 61 1 5 19 3.8 10 0 1 1
Source: pro-football-reference.com

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External links

2011 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 2011 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA", "Bama" or "The Tide") represented the University of Alabama in the 2011 NCAA Division I FBS football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 117th overall and 78th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC) and its 20th within the SEC Western Division. The team was led by head coach Nick Saban, in his fifth year, and played their home games at Bryant–Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of twelve wins and one loss (12–1 overall, 7–1 in the SEC) and as consensus national champions.

After the completion of the 2010 season, the Crimson Tide signed a highly rated recruiting class in February 2011 and completed spring practice the following April. With seventeen returning starters from the previous season, Alabama entered their 2011 campaign ranked as the number two team in the nation and as a favorite to win the Western Division and compete for the SEC championship. However, Alabama lost to the LSU Tigers in their regular season matchup, and as a result did not qualify for the 2011 SEC Championship Game. Despite not winning their conference championship, when the final Bowl Championship Series rankings were released, Alabama had the number two ranking to qualify for the 2012 BCS National Championship Game. In the rematch against LSU, the Crimson Tide defeated the Tigers 21–0 to capture their second BCS Championship in three years.

At the conclusion of the season, the Alabama defense led the nation in every major statistical category, and was the first to do so since the 1986 season. Additionally, several players were recognized for the individual accomplishments on the field. Barrett Jones won both the Wuerffel Trophy and the Outland Trophy; and Trent Richardson won the Doak Walker Award, was a finalist for the Heisman Trophy and was named the SEC Offensive Player of the Year. Also, seven players were named to various All-America Teams with Dont'a Hightower being a consensus selection and Mark Barron, Jones and Richardson each being unanimous selections. In April 2012, eight members of the 2011 squad were selected in the NFL Draft, with an additional six signed as undrafted free agents to various teams.

2011 Capital One Bowl

The 2011 Capital One Bowl was the sixty-fifth edition of the college football bowl game, and was played at the Citrus Bowl in Orlando, Florida. The game was played on January 1, 2011 and matched the Alabama Crimson Tide from the Southeastern Conference (SEC) with the Michigan State Spartans from the Big Ten Conference. Televised by ESPN, Alabama won by a final score of 49–7.

2012 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 2012 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA", "Bama" or "The Tide") represented the University of Alabama in the 2012 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) football season. It marked the Crimson Tide's 118th overall season of playing college football, 79th as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC) and 21st within the SEC Western Division. The team was led by head coach Nick Saban, in his sixth year, and played its home games at Bryant–Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. It finished the season with a record of 13 wins and 1 loss (13–1 overall, 7–1 in the SEC), as SEC champion and as consensus national champion after it defeated Notre Dame in the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) National Championship Game.

After they captured the 2011 national championship, the Crimson Tide signed a highly rated recruiting class in February 2012 and completed spring practice the following April. With twelve returning starters from the previous season, Alabama entered the 2012 season as the defending national champions, ranked as the number two team in the nation and as a favorite to win the Western Division and compete for both the SEC and national championships. The Crimson Tide opened the season with nine consecutive victories that included one over Michigan at a neutral site and a come-from-behind victory on the road at Louisiana State University (LSU). In their tenth game, Alabama was upset by Texas A&M, and dropped to the number four position in the rankings. However, after a series of upsets and victories in their final three games that included winning the SEC Championship over Georgia, Alabama qualified for the 2013 BCS National Championship Game against Notre Dame, where they won 42–14 and captured the 2012 national championship.

At the conclusion of the season, the Alabama defense led the nation in total defense, scoring defense and rushing defense and ranked 7th in passing defense. Offensively, the Alabama offense ranked 12th in scoring offense, 16th in rushing offense, 31st in total offense and 75th in passing offense. Starting quarterback AJ McCarron was ranked first nationally in pass efficiency. Additionally, several players were recognized for their individual accomplishments on the field. Starting center Barrett Jones won both the Rimington Trophy and the William V. Campbell Trophy, and was named as the Academic All-America of the Year; defensive coordinator Kirby Smart was named the 2012 American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) FBS Assistant Coach of the Year. Also, five players were named to various All-America Teams with Jones and C. J. Mosley being consensus selections and Dee Milliner and Chance Warmack being unanimous selections.

2012 SEC Championship Game

The 2012 SEC Championship Game was played on December 1, 2012, in the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, Georgia, and determined both the 2012 football champion of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The game featured the Georgia Bulldogs, winners of the SEC Eastern Division vs the Alabama Crimson Tide, the winner of the SEC Western Division.

Because Alabama and Georgia were both respectively ranked 2 and 3, the game was considered a de facto semifinal game, as the winner would automatically face the undefeated Notre Dame Fighting Irish in the National Championship with no vote necessary. Georgia was the designated "home" team. The game was televised by CBS Sports for the twelfth straight season. Kickoff was scheduled at 4:00 (EST). Alabama won the game 32-28 improving their record to 4-4 in the title game. Alabama's Eddie Lacy was named MVP after rushing for 181 yards and two touchdowns. The game at the time was the most watched college football game of the 2012 season (it would be surpassed by the 2013 BCS National Championship Game on January 7, 2013) with the game receiving a 10.1 share or 21.0 million viewers tuned in.

2013 All-Pro Team

The 2013 All-Pro Teams were named by the Associated Press (AP) the Pro Football Writers of America (PFWA), and the Sporting News (SN) for performance in the 2013 NFL season. While none of the All-Pro teams have the official imprimatur of the NFL (whose official recognition is nomination to the 2014 Pro Bowl), they are included in the NFL Record and Fact Book. Any player selected to any of the teams can be described as an "All-Pro". The AP team, with first-team and second-team selections, was chosen by a national panel of fifty NFL writers. The Sporting News All-NFL team is voted on by NFL players and executives and was released January 28, 2014. The PFWA team is selected by its more than 300 national members who are accredited media members covering the NFL.

2013 BCS National Championship Game

The 2013 Discover BCS National Championship Game was a postseason college football bowl game that took place on Monday, January 7, 2013, at Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida. It featured the No. 1 ranked Notre Dame Fighting Irish and No. 2 Alabama Crimson Tide. The Alabama Crimson Tide defeated the Notre Dame Fighting Irish 42–14 for the national championship and took home the Championship Trophy.

Alabama was the defending champion and represented the Southeastern Conference, which had participated in and emerged victorious from every standalone BCS Championship Game (since the format was introduced in the 2006–2007 season). Notre Dame did not belong to a conference and was the first independent team to play in the National Championship game since the start of the BCS.

The National Championship game between Alabama and Notre Dame was anticipated as an historical matchup with a rich tradition in college football. Going into the holiday season after Alabama was assured a spot in the National Championship after beating Georgia in the SEC Championship, sportscasters from both sides weighed in on who was most likely to win. Despite the historical record of, at the time, 5-1 in favor of Notre Dame many sports betting centers had Alabama as a heavy favorite with point spreads favoring Alabama as high as ten points over Notre Dame. Many prominent sports writers predicted Notre Dame to win based on several factors including strong overall defense, an inconsistent Alabama team (often cited as being "exposed" against LSU and Texas A&M), and various intangibles such as destiny and generalized fatigue from the dominant performances of the Southeastern Conference.In the aftermath of an Alabama 42 to 14 victory (with the score being 35 to 0 at one point in the game), the BCS National Championship game was considered by Sports Illustrated's Michael Rosenberg to have failed to live up to its hype despite dominating television ratings. Mark Schlabach of ESPN expressed the wish that a playoff system had been in place wherein Oregon or Florida would have played against Alabama. Tom Coyne of Associated Press concluded that Alabama was more talented and physical with better preparation and execution of its game plan than Notre Dame. Specifically, inconsistent tackling, blown coverages, and porous defense were cited by Aaron Ellis of Forbes.com as major detriments to Notre Dame's efforts.With the win, Alabama won their second straight BCS championship, their third championship in four years, and their ninth AP championship overall.

2013 Green Bay Packers season

The 2013 Green Bay Packers season was the franchise's 95th season overall, the 93rd in the National Football League, and the eighth under head coach Mike McCarthy. The Packers came into the 2013 season looking to win the NFC North for the 3rd year in a row. They came off a 45-31 loss to the San Francisco 49ers in the NFC Divisional Playoffs the previous season. The Packers started the 2013 season in a rematch with the 49ers, to whom they lost 34-28. After winning their home opener against the Redskins, Green Bay lost 34-30 in Cincinnati to the Bengals after holding a 30-14 lead in the 3rd quarter. Following the loss in Cincinnati, the Packers won 4 games in a row to sit at 5-2 before losing a Monday Night game at home to the Bears, 27-20. In that game, the Packers lost star quarterback Aaron Rodgers to a broken collarbone in the 1st quarter. He would be replaced by backups Scott Tolzien and Matt Flynn during recovery. In week 12, the Packers tied the Vikings 26-26; it was Green Bay's first tie since 1987.

The Packers would lose the next game 40-10 to the Lions on Thanksgiving to sit at 5-6-1, threatening to miss the postseason for the first time since 2008. The Packers then rallied to beat the Falcons 22-21 to even their record at 6-6-1. The following week, the Packers defeated the Dallas Cowboys 37-36 in Dallas after they had trailed 26-3 at halftime. The comeback was the largest in franchise history. The Packers would then lose a shootout with the Pittsburgh Steelers 38-31 at home to sit at 7-7-1, the first meeting between the teams since Super Bowl XLV. The following week, the Packers defeated the Chicago Bears 33-28 at Soldier Field to clinch the NFC North in a game in which the winner would've clinched the division. The game is well-known for a touchdown catch made by Randall Cobb from Aaron Rodgers with less than a minute remaining to seal the win. The play came on a 4th and 8 situation in which Cobb was wide open near the endzone. The Packers entered the playoffs as the 4 seed in the NFC. In the wild card game, they lost 23–20 in a rematch with the 49ers on a Phil Dawson field goal as time expired. The game was one of the coldest in NFL playoff history, with a final temperature of 5 °F (-15 °C)

The Packers would again lose Aaron Rodgers to a collarbone injury almost four years later in 2017. However, the team’s fortunes without Rodgers were much poorer the second time; the team would fail to win the division that year, finishing in third behind a more competent Detroit Lions team and surrendering the division title to arguably one of the most talented Minnesota Vikings teams in years. As a result, the Packers did not qualify for the postseason that year.

2014 Green Bay Packers season

The 2014 Green Bay Packers season was the franchise's 96th season overall, the 94th in the National Football League, and the ninth under head coach Mike McCarthy. The team tied with four other teams for a league-best 12 wins and 4 losses, while also adding a fourth consecutive NFC North division title. The club went undefeated at home for the first time since 2011. They also led the league in scoring, with 486 points, the second-most in franchise history. It marked the first time since the 2009 season that the team had a 4,000-yard passer, two 1,000-yard receivers, and a 1,000-yard rusher. They won the divisional round playoff game against the Cowboys, but then lost the conference championship game against the Seattle Seahawks in one of the biggest collapses in NFL playoff history. Quarterback Aaron Rodgers was named the league's Most Valuable Player.The Packers made the playoffs for the sixth straight season, tying the record set between 1993–98.

2014 Pro Bowl

The 2014 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2013 season. It took place at 2:30 pm local time on January 26 at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The game was televised nationally by NBC and was the final Pro Bowl on network television before ABC’s airing in 2018 as part of a simulcast with sister network ESPN, whose parent company Disney currently holds domestic TV rights to the game.

Significant changes to the Pro Bowl format were adopted in an attempt to make the game more "fan-friendly". These changes were proposed by National Football League Players Association president Dominique Foxworth and developed in partnership between the league and the player's union.The most significant change was a switch to a "fantasy draft" format rather than pitting AFC all-stars against NFC all-stars. Hall of Fame players Jerry Rice and Deion Sanders were chosen as honorary team captains, and joined by two active players each to assist in their selections. Chuck Pagano of the AFC South winning Indianapolis Colts coached Team Sanders, while Ron Rivera of the NFC South winning Carolina Panthers coached Team Rice. These coaches were selected for coaching the highest seeded teams to lose in the Divisional round of the playoffs, which has been the convention since the 2010 Pro Bowl.

Team Rice won the game 22–21.

2015 Green Bay Packers season

The 2015 Green Bay Packers season was the franchise's 97th season overall, 95th in the National Football League, and the tenth under head coach Mike McCarthy. With a Week 15 win over the Oakland Raiders, the Packers clinched a playoff spot for the seventh consecutive season, but they failed to win their fifth consecutive NFC North title after a Week 17 loss to the Minnesota Vikings as does matching their 12-4 record from last season. As a result, the fifth-seeded Packers traveled to Washington to face the fourth-seeded Redskins in the Wild Card round. They beat the Redskins 35–18, and then traveled to Arizona for a rematch against the second-seeded Arizona Cardinals, where the Packers' season ended as they lost to the Cardinals in overtime, 20–26.

3rd Annual NFL Honors

The 3rd Annual NFL Honors was an awards presentation by the National Football League honoring its best players from the 2013 NFL season. It was held on February 1, 2014, at Radio City Music Hall. Alec Baldwin returned for the third year to host the show. The show aired on Fox. Unlike previous NFL seasons, the Pro Football Hall of Fame announced its HOF Class of 2014 inductees during this award presentation.

Aaron Ripkowski

Aaron Randal Ripkowski (born December 20, 1992) is an American football fullback for the Kansas City Chiefs of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Oklahoma, and was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the sixth round of the 2015 NFL Draft.

Edgar Lacy

Edgar Eddie Lacy (August 2, 1944 – March 22, 2011) was an American basketball player who won two NCAA championships at UCLA, then played one season in the American Basketball Association with the Los Angeles Stars. In public printed media, his last name was generally rendered as Lacey. However, at the time he signed his professional contract, he indicated the correct spelling had always been Lacy.Lacy was a highly decorated player at Jefferson High School in Los Angeles. He was twice named a high school All-American by Parade Magazine and was Los Angeles city player of the year as a senior in 1963. Lacy chose to attend hometown UCLA and play for future Hall of Fame coach John Wooden. In his sophomore season, he was a starter on the Bruins' 1964–65 championship team. After a strong junior season, Lacy redshirted what would have been his senior year with a broken leg in 1966–67 as the Bruins won their third championship.

In 1967–68, Lacy opted to return and was again a starter for the Bruins. However, in a highly anticipated match-up between the Bruins and the Houston Cougars—a contest dubbed the "Game of the Century" by the media—Wooden benched Lacy after 11 minutes and he never re-entered the game. Upset with Wooden's public comments implying that he did not want back into the game, Lacy quit the team, missing what would be another UCLA championship run. "I've never enjoyed playing for that man," Lacy said of Wooden after quitting. In 2008, Wooden stated, "I'm sorry I said that. It hurt him, and that's why he quit. I was very disappointed. Edgar was a fine boy."Lacy was drafted by the San Francisco Warriors in the fourth round of the 1968 NBA Draft (he had also been drafted by the Boston Celtics the previous year). However, he instead played in the ABA for the Los Angeles Stars. Lacy played one season for the Stars, averaging 5.1 points and 3.9 rebounds in 46 games. Prior to the next season, he retired from professional basketball, stating his intention to return to college to pursue a law degree. Lacy ended up playing his entire basketball career -- high school, college and pro -- for teams based in Los Angeles.

Edgar Lacy lived in West Sacramento, California where he died on March 22, 2011. He was survived by his daughter, Celeste Lacy.

Geismar, Louisiana

Geismar is an unincorporated community in Ascension Parish, Louisiana, United States and is at the heart of Louisiana's chemical corridor. Geismar is south of Prairieville and west of Gonzales. The community has two schools, Dutchtown Primary/ Middle School and Dutchtown High School, which are ranked among the top schools in the state of Louisiana. The Mississippi River flows to the southeast along the southwest side of the community. The area is vulnerable to hurricanes and tropical systems due to its low elevation and its proximity to the coast of southeast Louisiana.

James Starks

James Darell Starks (born February 25, 1986) is a former American football running back. He played college football at Buffalo and was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the sixth round of the 2010 NFL Draft. He was a member of their Super Bowl XLV championship team.

Jesse Williams (American football)

Jesse Williams (born November 2, 1990), nicknamed "Tha Monstar", is an Australian former American football defensive tackle. Williams played college football for the University of Alabama, where he was a starter on the defensive line for the 2011 and 2012 national championship teams. The Seahawks chose him in the fifth round of the 2013 NFL Draft. Although he spent the majority of his pro career on the injured reserve list, Williams became the first Australian to win a Super Bowl ring as a member of Seattle's 2013 team.

List of Green Bay Packers Pro Bowl selections

The Green Bay Packers are a professional American football team based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. They are currently members of the North Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL), and are the third-oldest franchise in the NFL. The team has had representatives to the Pro Bowl every year since 1950 except for nine seasons. Below is a list of the Pro Bowl selections for each season.

National Football League Rookie of the Year Award

Various entities present a National Football League Rookie of the Year Award each season to the top rookie(s) in the National Football League (NFL). The NFL considers the rookie of the year awards by the Associated Press (AP) to be its official honor. The AP awards and Pepsi's rookie of the year award are presented each year at the NFL Honors.

T. J. Yeldon

Timothy Antonio "T. J." Yeldon Jr. (born October 2, 1993) is an American football running back who is currently a free agent. He was drafted by the Jaguars in the second round of the 2015 NFL draft. He played college football at Alabama.

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