Eddie Kotal

Edward Louis Kotal (September 1, 1902 – January 27, 1973) was an American football player and coach. He played professionally with the Green Bay Packers in the National Football League (NFL).

Biography

Kotal was on September 1, 1902 in Illinois.[1]

Career

Kotal played with the Green Bay Packers for five seasons. He was a member of the 1929 NFL Champion Packers.

He played at the collegiate level at Lawrence University and the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

Coaching career

Kotal later went on to coach football, basketball, track and field, and boxing at the University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point. He led teams to conference championships in all four sports and is an inductee in the University's Athletic Hall of Fame.[2]

In 1942, Kotal returned to the Green Bay Packers organization as a backfield coach and scout before becoming the chief scout for the Los Angeles Rams in 1946. In subsequent years, Kotal also assumed coaching responsibilities for the Rams as well.

He worked tirelessly scouring the country for top athletes, and everyone knew of Ed Kotal in the college ranks.

See also

References

  1. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/K/KotaEd20.htm
  2. ^ http://athletics.uwsp.edu/hof.aspx?hof=17&path=&kiosk=

External links

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