Eddie Bane

Edward Norman Bane (born March 22, 1952) is a former professional baseball pitcher and executive, who played from 1973 to 1976 for the Minnesota Twins of Major League Baseball (MLB).

Eddie Bane
Pitcher
Born: March 22, 1952 (age 67)
Chicago, Illinois
Batted: Right Threw: Left
MLB debut
July 4, 1973, for the Minnesota Twins
Last MLB appearance
September 12, 1976, for the Minnesota Twins
MLB statistics
Win–loss record7–13
Earned run average4.66
Strikeouts80
Teams

Career

Bane attended Arizona State University, where he pitched on the school's baseball team. He represented the United States at the 1971 Pan American Games, where he won a silver medal.[1] He was named to the 1973 College Baseball All-America Team and was elected to the National College Baseball Hall of Fame in 2008. He was a first-round selection in the 1973 Major League Baseball Draft.[2] He made his professional debut on July 4 with the Twins without spending any time in the minor leagues. That season, he pitched in 23 games, winning none and losing five.[3] He also spent parts of 1975 and 1976 with the Twins. He made his final major league appearance on September 12, 1976.

From 1974 to 1977, he primarily played for the Tacoma Twins, the team's AAA minor league affiliate. He played in the minor leagues until 1980, winning 49 career games at that level.[4]

He had a career Major League win–loss record of 7–13 with a 4.66 earned run average in 44 appearances and 168 innings pitched, allowing 182 hits and 84 bases on balls. He also notched 80 strikeouts, two saves and one complete game.[3]

Bane has held several positions since retiring as a player, including special assistant to the GM for the Tampa Bay Devil Rays (1999–2003), and scouting director for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (2004–2010). He is currently serving as the special assistant to the general manager with the Boston Red Sox, appointed on October 3, 2012.[5]

He was awarded the George Genovese Lifetime Achievement Award in Scouting on January 14, 2017.

He is the brother of Dan Bane, the CEO of the retailer Trader Joe's, and his son Jaymie is a major league scout with the Red Sox. His daughter, Veronica is a novelist with two novels created for young adults. Bane is a fan of author Vince Flynn saying, "Vince could write a coloring book and I would read it." [6]

References

  1. ^ "1971 Pan American Games (Rosters)". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference, LLC. Retrieved July 21, 2016.
  2. ^ "Bane thinks he'll make it as a pro". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. AP. 19 July 1973. p. 4D. Retrieved 7 June 2010.
  3. ^ a b "Eddie Bane Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference, LLC. Retrieved December 1, 1973. Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  4. ^ "Eddie Bane Minor League Statistics & History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference, LLC. Retrieved December 1, 1973. Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  5. ^ "Red Sox name Eddie Bane a special assistant". Boston.com. October 3, 2012. Retrieved December 1, 2013.
  6. ^ "What's Your Story: Eddie Bane". Vinceflynn.com. Retrieved December 1, 2013.

External links

1972 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament

The 1972 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1972 NCAA University Division baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its twenty-sixth year. Eight regional districts sent representatives to the College World Series with preliminary rounds within each district serving to determine each representative. These events would later become known as regionals. Each district had its own format for selecting teams, resulting in 28 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The twenty-sixth tournament's champion was Southern California, coached by Rod Dedeaux. The Most Outstanding Player was Russ McQueen of the University of Southern California.

1973 Arizona State Sun Devils baseball team

The 1973 Arizona State Sun Devils baseball team represented Arizona State University in the 1973 NCAA University Division baseball season. The Sun Devils played their home games at Packard Stadium. The team was coached by Jim Brock in his second season at Arizona State.

The Sun Devils reached the College World Series, finishing as the runner up to Southern California.

1973 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.From 1947 to 1980, the American Baseball Coaches Association was the only All-American selector recognized by the NCAA.

1973 Minnesota Twins season

The 1973 Minnesota Twins finished 81–81, third in the American League West.

1973 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament

The 1973 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1973 NCAA University Division baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its twenty-seventh year. Eight regional districts sent representatives to the College World Series with preliminary rounds within each district serving to determine each representative. These events would later become known as regionals. Each district had its own format for selecting teams, resulting in 32 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The twenty-seventh tournament's champion was the University of Southern California, coached by Rod Dedeaux. The Most Outstanding Player was Dave Winfield of Minnesota. Winfield was the starting pitcher in two games, tossing 17​1⁄3 innings, allowing 9 hits, 1 earned run, and striking out 29. In addition, he batted .467 in the Series.

Southern California became the first team to win four consecutive College World Series.

1975 Minnesota Twins season

The 1975 Minnesota Twins finished 76–83, fourth in the American League West.

1976 Minnesota Twins season

The 1976 Minnesota Twins finished 85–77, third in the American League West. Only 715,394 fans attended Twins games, the lowest total in the American League. It was the third year in a row that the Twins attracted the fewest fans in the AL.

Arizona State Sun Devils baseball

The Arizona State Sun Devils baseball program at the Arizona State University (ASU) is part of the Pac-12 Conference. Since it became a member of the Pac-12, it had the highest winning percentage, at .681, of all schools that participate in Division I baseball within the conference. ASU's NCAA leading 54 consecutive 30 win seasons was the longest streak in the nation. The Sun Devils' only losing seasons occurred in 1963, 2017,& 2018 The Sun Devils had been nationally ranked during at least a part of every season of their 58-year history until 2017. The Sun Devils have finished 27 times in the Top 10, 22 times in the Top 5, and 5 times as the No. 1 team in the nation.ASU is one of the most successful college baseball programs in the country. The Sun Devils have won five national championships, the fourth-most by any school, and are 1st in total number of alumni to ever play in Major League Baseball. Notable Sun Devil baseball alumni include Barry Bonds, Reggie Jackson, Dustin Pedroia, Andre Ethier, Bob Horner, Paul Lo Duca, and Rick Monday.

Jered Weaver

Jered David Weaver (born October 4, 1982) is an American former professional baseball starting pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Los Angeles Angels and San Diego Padres. Weaver was drafted in the first round (12th overall) in the 2004 Major League Baseball draft by the Angels out of Long Beach State. He was a three-time All Star, and twice led the American League in wins. He is the younger brother of former pitcher Jeff Weaver.

Joe Zdeb

Joseph Edmund Zdeb (born June 27, 1953) is a former professional baseball outfielder. He played all or part of three seasons in Major League Baseball with the Kansas City Royals from 1977 to 1979, primarily as a left fielder.

Koji Uehara

Koji Uehara (上原 浩治, Uehara Kōji, [ɯehara koːdʑi]; born April 3, 1975) is a Japanese former professional baseball pitcher. He previously played for the Yomiuri Giants of Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB), as well as the Baltimore Orioles, Texas Rangers, Boston Red Sox, and Chicago Cubs of Major League Baseball (MLB).

A right-handed pitcher, Uehara has a solid MLB career strikeout rate, with 10.7 K/9 and walk rate of 1.5 BB/9 (through the 2017 season). Through the 2017 season, his career 7.33 K/BB is the best in MLB history for a player with at least 100 innings pitched. Uehara won the 2013 ALCS MVP Award, and closed the final game of the 2013 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals. With his World Series win, Uehara became one of sixteen players in history to have won both a World Series and a World Baseball Classic.

List of Tampa Bay Rays owners and executives

This is a list of owners and executives of the Tampa Bay Rays of Major League Baseball.

List of baseball players who went directly to Major League Baseball

This is a list of baseball players who went directly to the major leagues. They are distinguished as a group by the fact that they made their North American professional debut with a Major League Baseball franchise without previously having played at the professional level (excluding fall leagues and winter leagues), such as minor league affiliates of major league teams, the Negro Leagues, Japanese professional leagues, or independent professional teams.

After their major league debuts, many of these players played in professional leagues other than Major League Baseball. Included are the Bonus Babies, who joined major league rosters from 1947 to 1957 and from 1962 to 1965 under the Bonus Rule.

In recent years, the practice of players going directly into the majors has become rare: it has only occurred eight times since 1980, and only twice since 2000.

Mike Leake

Michael Raymond Leake (born November 12, 1987), is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Arizona Diamondbacks of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the Cincinnati Reds, San Francisco Giants, St. Louis Cardinals, and Seattle Mariners.

Leake played college baseball for the Arizona State Sun Devils of Arizona State University. The Reds selected Leake in the first round of the 2009 MLB draft. They promoted him to the major leagues at the start of the 2010 season, without having him pitch in the minor leagues, one of only 21 baseball players to go straight from the draft to the major league team that drafted them.

Leake pitched for the Reds through 2015, at which point he was traded to the Giants. A free agent that offseason, he signed with the Cardinals. The Cardinals traded him to the Mariners in 2017. He was traded for a third time in his career in 2019 as the Arizona Diamondbacks agreed to acquire him at the Trade Deadline.

National College Baseball Hall of Fame

The National College Baseball Hall of Fame is an institution operated by the College Baseball Foundation serving as the central point for the study of the history of college baseball in the United States. In partnership with the Southwest Collection/Special Collections Library located on the campus of Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas, the Hall of Fame inducts former collegiate players and coaches who have met selection criteria of distinction.

Westminster High School (Westminster, California)

Westminster High School is a public high school located in Westminster, California. It is part of the Huntington Beach Union High School District. It is currently the only school within the Huntington Beach Union High School District to have a working farm as well as the largest school in Orange County.

Players
Coaches
Veteran players
(pre-1947 era)

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