Edd Roush

Edd J. Roush (May 8, 1893 – March 21, 1988) was a Major League Baseball player who was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962. He played the majority of his career at center field, led the National League in hitting twice, and had his best years with the Cincinnati Reds.

Edd Roush
Edd Roush
Center fielder
Born: May 8, 1893
Oakland City, Indiana
Died: March 21, 1988 (aged 94)
Bradenton, Florida
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
August 20, 1913, for the Chicago White Sox
Last MLB appearance
September 27, 1931, for the Cincinnati Reds
MLB statistics
Batting average.323
Hits2,376
Home runs68
Runs batted in981
Teams
Career highlights and awards
Member of the National
Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Baseball Hall of Fame Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg
Induction1962
Election MethodVeteran's Committee

Career

Roush made his major league debut on August 20, 1913 for the Chicago White Sox. He switched to the fledgling Federal League in 1914 and spent two seasons with the Indianapolis Hoosiers, who became the Newark Peppers in 1915. In 1916, he split the season between the New York Giants and the Cincinnati Reds.

With the Reds from 1916 to 1926,[1] the left-handed hitting Roush never batted below .321, batted .352 in 1921, and won the National League batting title in 1917 and 1919, hitting .341 and .321. He was an important part of the Red's World Series championship in 1919, and for his entire life he insisted that even if the White Sox had played the 1919 World Series on the level, the Reds would have won.

Roush led the league in slugging average (.455) in 1918, in doubles (41) in 1923, and in triples (21) in 1924. He was renowned as having the best arm of any outfielder in his era. He held out most of the 1922 season over a salary dispute[2] that continued into spring 1923.[3]

Roush played for the New York Giants again from 1927 until 1929, and then rejoined the Reds for a single season in 1931 before retiring. He sat out the 1930 season over a salary dispute.[2]

Roush finished his 18-year career with a .323 lifetime average, 268 stolen bases and 182 triples. He never struck out more than 25 times in a season and had 30 inside-the-park home runs.[1]

Roush, who used a massive 48-ounce Louisville Slugger (the heaviest bat used in baseball), claimed that he never broke a bat in his big league career.

Post-playing career

Roush served one season as the Reds coach alongside his good friend, manager Bill McKechnie, who had previously been his teammate. During his career he had saved his money and was able to retire after he finished playing. He built a house in Bradenton, Florida, and used it as a winter residence. He frequently attended spring training and told stories of the old days. Roush spent most of his time in his hometown of Oakland City, where he served on the town and school boards and ran the Montgomery cemetery for 35 years.[4]

He was one of the 22 players interviewed by Lawrence Ritter and included in the original version of The Glory of Their Times, a ground-breaking book that set a standard for oral histories of baseball.[5]

Honors

In addition to Roush's selection into the Baseball Hall of Fame, chosen with McKechnie,[6] he is also a member of the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame, inducted in 1960.[7]

Considered the greatest player in Reds' history at the time, Roush was invited to throw out the first ball at the last game at Crosley Field on June 24, 1970. Joe Morgan called Roush "the best of us all".

In 1981, Ritter and Donald Honig included Roush in their book The 100 Greatest Baseball Players of All Time.[8]

Death

Roush died at the age of 94 on March 21, 1988, in Bradenton, Florida. At the time of his death he was the last surviving Federal League participant and the last surviving 1919 World Series participant.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Edd Roush Stats". Baseball-reference.com. Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2017-04-18.
  2. ^ a b Suehsdorf, A. D. (1978). The Great American Baseball Scrapbook, p. 56. Random House. ISBN 0-394-50253-1.
  3. ^ "Ed Roush Declines to Play With Reds: Star Outfielder Says He Will Join an Industrial League Team This Season". The New York Times. April 6, 1923. p. 13. Retrieved March 14, 2011.
  4. ^ Sandoval, Jim. "Edd Roush". SABR. Retrieved 8 May 2015.
  5. ^ Ritter, Lawrence (1966). The Glory of Their Times: The Story of Baseball Told By the Men Who Played It. New York, N.Y.: William Morrow.
  6. ^ "National Baseball Hall of Fame – Explorer". baseballhall.org. National Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved June 4, 2019.
  7. ^ "Reds Hall of Fame Member Directory". mlb.com. Major League Baseball. Retrieved June 4, 2019.
  8. ^ Ritter, Lawrence; Honig, Donald (1981). The 100 Greatest Baseball Players of All Time. archive.org. Crown Publishers. p. 211. ISBN 0-517-543001.

External links

1914 Indianapolis Hoosiers season

The 1914 Indianapolis Hoosiers season was a season in American baseball. The Hoosiers won the inaugural Federal League championship, finishing 88–65, 1½ games ahead of the Chicago Federals.

1916 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1916 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished tied for seventh and last place in the National League with the St. Louis Cardinals. Both teams finished with a record of 60–93, 33½ games behind the Brooklyn Robins

1917 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1917 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the National League with a record of 78–76, 20 games behind the New York Giants.

1917 Major League Baseball season

The 1917 Major League Baseball season.

1918 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1918 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the National League with a record of 68–60, 15½ games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1919 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1919 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The Reds won the National League pennant, then went on to win the 1919 World Series. The team's accomplishments were overshadowed by the subsequent Black Sox scandal, when it was discovered that their American League opponents, the Chicago White Sox had conspired to throw the series.

1920 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1920 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the National League with a record of 82–71, 10½ games behind the Brooklyn Robins.

1923 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1923 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the National League with a record of 91–63, 4½ games behind the New York Giants.

1925 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1925 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the National League with a record of 80–73, 15 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1926 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1926 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the National League with 87 wins and 67 losses, 2 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1927 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1927 New York Giants season was the franchise's 45th season. The team finished third in the National League with a record of 92–62, 2 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1931 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1931 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished eighth and last in the National League with a record of 58–96, 43 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1962 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1962 followed a new system for even-number years. Since 1956 the Baseball Writers' Association of America and Veterans Committee had alternated in their duties, but the BBWAA, voting by mail to select from recent major league players, had elected no one for 1958 and no one for 1960. Now there would be a second, "runoff" election in case of no winner. At the same time the Veterans Committee resumed meeting annually to consider executives, managers, umpires, and earlier major league players.

The provision for a runoff election was not necessary yet, for the writers elected two new candidates on their first ballot, Bob Feller and Jackie Robinson. The Veterans Committee also selected Bill McKechnie and Edd Roush, both of whom were still alive to be interviewed and invited to the induction ceremonies.

Center fielder

A center fielder, abbreviated CF, is the outfielder in baseball who plays defense in center field – the baseball and softball fielding position between left field and right field. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the center fielder is assigned the number 8.

Cincinnati Reds award winners and league leaders

This article is a list of baseball players who are Cincinnati Reds players that are winners of Major League Baseball awards and recognitions, Reds awards and recognitions, and/or are league leaders in various statistical areas.

Evansville Evas

The Evansville Evas was a primary nickname of an early minor league baseball team in Evansville, Indiana. Early Evansville teams played in three leagues under a variety of nicknames from 1901–1931. Evansville was without a team until the 1938 Evansville Bees restarted Evansville baseball. Baseball Hall of Fame Inductees Hank Greenberg (1931) and Chuck Klein (1927) and Edd Roush (1912–1913) played for Evansville during the early era, joining Warren Spahn as Evansville alumni in the Hall of Fame. Beginning in 1915, Evansville played home games at Bosse Field, which is the third oldest baseball stadium in the United States, still in use today by the Evansville Otters of the Frontier League.

List of Cincinnati Reds team records

This is a list of team records for the Cincinnati Reds baseball team. (The Reds do not recognize records set before 1900.)

Roush

Roush is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Chris Roush, American economist

Edd Roush, baseball player

J. Edward Roush, politician

John A. Roush, president of Centre College

Patricia Roush, American activist against international child abduction

William R. Roush, American chemist

Sherrilyn Roush

Jack Roush, owner of:

Roush Fenway Racing, a NASCAR team

Roush Performance, an automotive company

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Veterans Committee
Pitchers
Catchers
First basemen
Second basemen
Third basemen
Shortstops
Outfielders
Designated hitters
Managers
Executives /
pioneers
Umpires

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