Ed Walsh

Edward Augustine "Big Ed" Walsh (May 14, 1881 – May 26, 1959) was an American pitcher and manager in Major League Baseball. From 1906 to 1912, he had several seasons where he was one of the best pitchers in baseball. Injuries shortened his career. Walsh holds the record for lowest career earned run average, 1.82.[1] He is one of two modern (post-1901) pitchers to win 40 or more games in a single season. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1946.

Ed Walsh
Ed Walsh portrait 1911
Walsh with the Chicago White Sox in 1911
Pitcher / Manager
Born: May 14, 1881
Plains Township, Pennsylvania
Died: May 26, 1959 (aged 78)
Pompano Beach, Florida
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 7, 1904, for the Chicago White Sox
Last MLB appearance
September 11, 1917, for the Boston Braves
MLB statistics
Win–loss record195–126
Earned run average1.82
Strikeouts1,736
Teams
As player

As manager

Career highlights and awards
Member of the National
Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Baseball Hall of Fame Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg
Induction1946
Election MethodVeteran's Committee

Early life

Walsh was born in Plains Township, Pennsylvania, to Michael and Jane Walsh. He worked in the Luzerne County coal mines when he was young. Walsh started his professional baseball career with the 1902 Wilkes-Barre Barons.[2] After the 1903 season, the Chicago White Sox purchased Walsh's contract for $750.[3]

MLB career

Peak years

Walsh made his major league debut in 1904 with the Chicago White Sox and pitched his first full season in 1906, going 17–13 with a 1.88 ERA and 171 strikeouts.[4] In Game Three of that year's World Series, which the White Sox won over the Chicago Cubs in six games, Walsh struck out a then-World Series record 12 batters. He also struck out at least one batter each inning of that game; this feat has since been duplicated only once, by Bob Gibson in the 1968 World Series opener. From this season through 1912, Walsh averaged 24 victories and 220 strikeouts and posted an ERA below 2.00 five times. He also led the league in saves five times in this span. His finest individual season came in 1908 when he went 40–15 with 269 strikeouts, 6 saves and a 1.42 ERA,[5] leading the American League in wins and strikeouts.[6] In 1910, he posted the lowest ERA (1.27) for a pitcher with at least 20 starts and a losing record. Walsh also set an American League record by pitching 464 innings in a season. On August 27, 1911, Walsh no-hit the Boston Red Sox 5-0.

Interviewed for the book The Glory of Their Times, Hall of Famer Sam Crawford referred to Walsh's use of a pitch that was later outlawed: "Big Ed Walsh. Great big, strong, good-looking fellow. He threw a spitball. I think that ball disintegrated on the way to the plate, and the catcher put it back together again. I swear, when it went past the plate, it was just the spit went by".[7]

In 1910, the White Sox opened White Sox Park, which was soon nicknamed Comiskey Park by the press in honor of team owner Charles Comiskey. The name was officially changed to Comiskey Park in 1913. An apocryphal story goes that architect Zachary Taylor Davis consulted Walsh in setting the park's field dimensions. Choosing a design that favored himself and other White Sox pitchers, rather than hitters, Walsh made Comiskey Park a "pitcher's park" for its entire 80-year history.

Later career

Ed Walsh pitching
Walsh pitching for the White Sox c. 1911

Walsh was a workhorse who pitched an average of 375 innings annually during the six seasons of 1907 through 1912. After the 1912 season, Walsh reportedly requested a full year off to rest his arm.[8] Nevertheless, he showed up for spring training the following season, contending, "The White Sox needed me—implored me to return—so I did".[8]

Walsh's playing time began dwindling in 1913.[8] It has been claimed that he came into spring training in poorer physical shape than other members of the White Sox pitching staff, and his pride led him to try to keep up with the other pitchers in terms of pitch speed before getting into adequate shape, thereby causing damage to his pitching arm. "I could feel the muscles grind and wrench during the game, and it seemed to me my arm would leap out of my socket when I shot the ball across the plate", Walsh later recalled. "My arm would keep me awake till morning with a pain I had never known before".[8] He pitched only 16 games during the 1913 season, and a meager 13 games over the next three years.[8]

By 1916, Walsh's arm was dead. He wanted a year off, but Charles Comiskey released him instead.[9] He attempted a comeback with the Boston Braves in 1917, but was let go, ending his major league career.[9] He later did some pitching in the Eastern League, and gave umpiring a try (he umpired 87 American League games during the 1922 season), after which he was a coach for the White Sox for several seasons (1923–1924, 1928–1929).[10]

Walsh retired with 195 wins, 126 losses,[8] and 1736 strikeouts. His career ERA of 1.82 is the lowest major league ERA ever posted.[8] He has the second-lowest career WHIP in MLB history (1.00) and the lowest ever for someone with 10 or more seasons pitched.

Later life and legacy

Walsh was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1946.[9] He died on May 26, 1959, nearly two weeks after his 78th birthday.

In 1999, Walsh was ranked number 82 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players,[11] and was nominated as a finalist for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. In 2011, he was inducted into the Irish American Baseball Hall of Fame.[12]

Walsh's son Ed Walsh Jr. played for the White Sox from 1928 to 1932.[13]

See also

References

  1. ^ Coffey (2004), pp. 26–33.
  2. ^ "NEPA players in Major League Baseball history". The Times-Tribune. Retrieved November 21, 2014.
  3. ^ Schimler, Stuart. "Big Ed Walsh". sabr.org. Retrieved August 4, 2017.
  4. ^ Kashatus (2002), p. 84.
  5. ^ Kashatus (2002), pp. 84–85.
  6. ^ "Ed Walsh Stats". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved August 4, 2017.
  7. ^ Kashatus (2002), pp. 83–84.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g Kashatus (2002), p. 85.
  9. ^ a b c "The Ballplayers – Ed Walsh". BaseballLibrary.com. Archived from the original on December 29, 2008. Retrieved June 4, 2009.
  10. ^ "Ed Walsh". Retrosheet. Retrieved August 26, 2017.
  11. ^ 100 Greatest Baseball Players by The Sporting News : A Legendary List by Baseball Almanac
  12. ^ Bios Of The Inductees Archived May 4, 2014, at the Wayback Machine. Irish American Baseball Hall of Fame website. Retrieved 2014-02-23.
  13. ^ "Ed Walsh". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved August 12, 2013.

Further reading

  • Coffey, Michael (2004). 27 Men Out: Baseball's Perfect Games. New York: Atria Books. ISBN 0-7434-4606-2.
  • Kashatus, William C. (2002). Diamonds in the Coalfields: 21 Remarkable Baseball Players, Managers, and Umpires from Northeast Pennsylvania. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company. ISBN 978-0-7864-1176-4.

External links

Preceded by
Smoky Joe Wood
No-hitter pitcher
August 27, 1911
Succeeded by
George Mullin
1906 World Series

The 1906 World Series featured a crosstown matchup between the Chicago Cubs, who had posted the highest regular-season win total (116) and winning percentage (.763) in the major leagues since the advent of the 154-game season; and the Chicago White Sox. The White Sox, known as the "Hitless Wonders" after finishing with the worst team batting average (.230) in the American League, beat the Cubs in six games for one of the greatest upsets in Series history. This was the first World Series played by two teams from the same metropolitan area.

The teams split the first four games; then the Hitless Wonders (a name coined by sportswriter Charles Dryden) exploded for 26 hits in the last two games. True to their nickname, the White Sox hit only .198 as a team in winning the series but it beat the .196 average produced by the Cubs.

In Game 3, Ed Walsh struck out 12 Cubs, breaking the previous record of 11 set by Bill Dinneen in 1903.

The 1906 Series was the first to be played between two teams from the same city. To date, it remains the only World Series played between the two Chicago teams (In fact, it would be another 102 years before both Chicago teams would qualify for the playoffs during the same season, as this was next accomplished in 2008), and one of only two Series (the other being the 1944 World Series) played outside New York City that featured two teams from the same city (although the 1989 World Series was played between the San Francisco Giants and the Oakland Athletics, which are roughly 10 miles apart). This is also the most recent World Series where both teams were making their first appearance in the Fall Classic.

1907 Chicago White Sox season

The 1907 Chicago White Sox led the American League for much of the first half but finished third.

Chicago allowed the fewest runs in the AL. The pitching staff was led by Ed Walsh, who paced the circuit in innings pitched (422.1), complete games (37), and earned run average (1.60).

1908 Chicago White Sox season

The 1908 season was the ninth in Chicago White Sox history and its eighth as a major league team. Owner Charles Comiskey optioned land in the summer of 1908 for what would become Comiskey Park. Despite ace pitcher Ed Walsh going an incredible 40–15 in 1908, the Sox could only muster a 3rd-place finish in the American League standings, behind Detroit and Cleveland, ultimately finishing 88–64.

1908 Major League Baseball season

The 1908 Major League Baseball season. The Chicago Cubs defeated the Detroit Tigers 4–1 to win the World Series.

1910 Major League Baseball season

The 1910 Major League Baseball season.

1924 Chicago White Sox season

The 1924 Chicago White Sox season was a season in major league baseball. Despite the best efforts of player-manager Eddie Collins, the White Sox finished last in the American League for the first time.

Addie Joss' perfect game

On October 2, 1908, Addie Joss pitched a perfect game, the fourth in Major League Baseball history, and only the second in American League history. He threw it at League Park, in Cleveland, Ohio.

Earned run average

In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched (i.e. the traditional length of a game). It is determined by dividing the number of earned runs allowed by the number of innings pitched and multiplying by nine. Runs resulting from defensive errors (including pitchers' defensive errors) are recorded as unearned runs and omitted from ERA calculations.

Ed Walsh (ice hockey)

Edward Walsh (born August 18, 1951 in Somerville, Massachusetts and raised in Arlington, Massachusetts) is an American retired professional ice hockey goaltender who played 3 games in the World Hockey Association for the Edmonton Oilers in 1978–79 but spent most of his career in the minors with the American Hockey League Nova Scotia Voyageurs, Rochester Americans and Springfield Indians.

As a youth, he played in the 1963 and 1964 Quebec International Pee-Wee Hockey Tournaments with a minor ice hockey team from Boston. He later played goal for Boston University. He represented the United States in the 1974 and 1981 Ice Hockey World Championship and was invited to the 1976 Canada Cup training camp although he did not make the final team.

Ed Walsh Jr.

Edward Arthur Walsh (February 11, 1905 – October 31, 1937) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher from Meriden, Connecticut, and son of Hall of Famer Ed Walsh. He played four seasons in the Majors, all with Chicago White Sox, from 1928 through 1932. Although he is not technically a "Junior" (his father's middle name was Augustine), he is generally referred to in sources as Ed Walsh Jr.

Harry "Hap" Holmes Memorial Award

The Hap Holmes Memorial Award is an ice hockey trophy awarded annually to the goaltenders of the American Hockey League team with the lowest goals against average, and who have appeared in at least 25 regular season games.

Prior to 1972 awarded to the goaltender with the lowest goals-against average who appeared in at least 50% of regular season games. It was first awarded in 1948. The trophy is named after Hap Holmes.

Innings pitched

In baseball, innings pitched (IP) are the number of innings a pitcher has completed, measured by the number of batters and baserunners that are put out while the pitcher is on the pitching mound in a game. Three outs made is equal to one inning pitched. One out counts as one-third of an inning, and two outs counts as two-thirds of an inning. Sometimes, the statistic is written 34.1, 72.2, or 91.0, for example, to represent ​34 1⁄3 innings, ​72 2⁄3 innings, and 91 innings exactly, respectively.

Runners left on base by a pitcher are not counted in determining innings pitched. It is possible for a pitcher to enter a game, give up several hits and possibly even several runs, and be removed before achieving any outs, thereby recording a total of zero innings pitched. Alternatively, it is possible for a pitcher to enter a situation where there are two runners on base and no outs. He'll throw one pitch which will result in a triple play, and for that one pitch he'll be credited with a full inning pitched.

List of Chicago White Sox Opening Day starting pitchers

The Chicago White Sox are a Major League Baseball franchise based in Chicago. They play in the American League Central division. The White Sox have used 62 Opening Day starting pitchers since they were established as a Major League team in 1901. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The White Sox have a record of 60 wins and 53 losses in their Opening Day games, through the 2013 season.The White Sox have played in three different home ball parks. They played at South Side Park from 1901 through the middle of 1910, the first Comiskey Park from 1910 through 1990, and have played at the second Comiskey Park, now known as U.S. Cellular Field, since 1991. They had a record of four wins and two losses in Opening Day games at South Side Park, 18 wins and 19 losses at the first Comiskey Park and four wins and one loss at U.S. Cellular Field, for a total home record in Opening Day games of 27 wins and 22 losses. Their record in Opening Day away games is 33 wins and 31 losses.Mark Buehrle holds the record for making the most Opening Day starts for the White Sox, with nine. Billy Pierce had seven Opening Day starts for the White Sox, Wilbur Wood had five, Tommy Thomas and Jack McDowell each had four, and Frank Smith, Jim Scott, Lefty Williams, Sad Sam Jones, Bill Dietrich, Gary Peters and Tommy John each had three. Several Baseball Hall of Famers have made Opening Day starts for the White Sox, including Ed Walsh, Red Faber, Ted Lyons, Early Wynn and Tom Seaver.The White Sox have played in the World Series five times. They won in 1906, 1917 and 2005, and lost in 1919 and 1959. Frank Owen was the Opening Day starting pitcher in 1906, Williams in 1917 and 1919, Pierce in 1959 and Buehrle in 2005. The White Sox won all five Opening Day games in those seasons.In addition to being the White Sox' Opening Day starter in 1917 and 1919, Williams was also the Opening Day starter in 1920. However, he was suspended from the team later in the season and then banned from baseball for life for his role in throwing the 1919 World Series. Ed Cicotte, who had been the White Sox' 1918 Opening Day starter, was also banned from baseball as a result of his actions during the 1919 World Series. Ken Brett's Opening Day start on April 7, 1977 against the Toronto Blue Jays was the first game in Blue Jays' history. The Blue Jays won the game 9–5.

List of Chicago White Sox team records

This is a list of team records for the Chicago White Sox professional baseball team.

List of Major League Baseball annual saves leaders

The following is a list of annual leaders in saves in Major League Baseball (MLB), with separate lists for the American League and the National League. The list also includes several professional leagues and associations that were never part of MLB.

In baseball, a save is credited to a pitcher who finishes a game for the winning team under prescribed circumstances. Most commonly a relief pitcher ("reliever") earns a save by entering in the ninth inning of a game in which his team is winning by three or fewer runs and finishing the game by pitching one inning without losing the lead. The statistic was created by Jerome Holtzman in 1959 to "measure the effectiveness of relief pitchers" and was adopted as an MLB official statistic in 1969. The save has been retroactively measured for pitchers before that date.

MLB recognizes the player or players in each league with the most saves each season. In retrospect, the five saves by Jack Manning meant he led the National League in its inaugural year, while Bill Hoffer was the American League's first saves champion with three. Mordecai Brown was the first pitcher to record at least 10 saves in a season. Dan Quisenberry, Bruce Sutter, Firpo Marberry, and Ed Walsh are the only pitchers to lead the league in saves five times (though Marberry and Walsh did so before 1969). Sutter is also tied with Harry Wright, Dan Quisenberry and Craig Kimbrel for the most consecutive seasons leading the league in saves with four.

List of Major League Baseball career ERA leaders

In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched (i.e. the traditional length of a game). It is determined by dividing the number of earned runs allowed by the number of innings pitched and multiplying by nine. Runs resulting from defensive errors (including pitchers' defensive errors) are recorded as unearned runs and are not used to determine ERA.

This is a list of the top 100 players in career earned run average, who have thrown at least 1,000 innings.

Ed Walsh holds the MLB earned run average record with a 1.816. Addie Joss (1.887) and Jim Devlin (1.896) are the only other pitchers with a career earned run average under 2.000.

List of Major League Baseball career WHIP leaders

In baseball statistics, walks plus hits per inning pitched (WHIP) is a sabermetric measurement of the number of baserunners a pitcher has allowed per inning pitched. WHIP reflects a pitcher's propensity for allowing batters to reach base, therefore a lower WHIP indicates better performance. WHIP is calculated by adding the number of walks and hits allowed and dividing this sum by the number of innings pitched.

Below is the list of the top 100 Major League Baseball pitchers in Walks plus hits per inning pitched (WHIP) with at least 1,000 innings pitched.

Addie Joss is the all-time leader with a career WHIP of 0.9678. Ed Walsh (0.9996) is the only other player with a career WHIP under 1.0000.

Plains Township, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

Plains Township is a township in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, United States (on the outskirts of Wilkes-Barre). The population was 9,961 at the 2010 census. The municipality is the birthplace of Chicago White Sox hall of famer Ed Walsh and John J. Yeosock, a United States Army general who commanded the 3rd U.S. Army during Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm. Mohegan Sun Pocono is a casino in Plains Township (located along PA 315).

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Veterans Committee
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Catchers
First basemen
Second basemen
Third basemen
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Outfielders
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