Ed Salem

Edward Joseph Salem (August 28, 1928 – December 21, 2001) was an American football quarterback and defensive back. He was a 1950 College Football All-America Team selection from the University of Alabama Crimson Tide and played one season for the National Football League's Washington Redskins and one season for the Canadian Football League's Montreal Alouettes.

Salem was born in Tucson, Arizona and arrived in Tuscaloosa, Alabama to play for Harold Drew's Crimson Tide at a time when they were still rising to national prominence. He starred on all sides of the ball. As a quarterback he was the team's top passer in 1948, 1949 and 1950. He was also the Tide's leading rusher in 1948 and top scorer in 1948 and 1949, a season in which he also led the team in interceptions. In 1950, he was the Tide's top punt returner. In Alabama's 55-0 victory over rival Auburn University in the 1948 Iron Bowl he threw for three touchdowns, rushed for another, and kicked seven extra points. Alabama's athletics staff named him one of the Tide's 50 best players in history in 1992.[1]

The Washington Redskins made Salem the 15th player selected overall in the second round of the 1951 NFL Draft. He played one year for the Redskins, recording five interceptions on defense. For the following season he signed with the Montreal Alouettes, making his mark there by kicking what was then a league record field goal of 53 yards (48 m)[1]

After leaving professional football, Salem moved to Birmingham, Alabama and opened the first "Ed Salem's Drive-In" on what became a noted cruising strip on the section of the Bee Line Highway between Birmingham and North Birmingham. He later expanded with additional locations in the Lakeview neighborhood. Ed Salem's Drive-In #3, formerly Eli's Drive-In, was the site of WSGN's famed "Sky Castle" deejay booth, where the station's "Good Guys" evening rock and roll deejays would take live requests.[2]

In addition to his restaurants, Salem opened a travel agency and several bowling alleys and acted as a real estate developer. He died in 2001 from complications from diabetes and was buried at Birmingham's Elmwood Cemetery.[3]

Salem was inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame in the Class of 2010.[1]

Ed Salem
No. 26
Position:Defensive back
Quarterback
Personal information
Born:August 28, 1928
Tucson, Arizona
Died:December 21, 2001 (aged 73)
Birmingham, Alabama
Career information
College:Alabama
NFL Draft:1951 / Round: 2 / Pick: 15
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Games played:12
TDs-INTs:0-2
Interceptions caught:5
Player stats at NFL.com

References

  1. ^ a b c "Ex-Tide QB to be honored by Alabama Sports Hall". The Tuscaloosa News. May 17, 2010. Retrieved May 17, 2010.
  2. ^ "Ed Salem's Drive-In". Bhamwiki. May 1, 2010. Retrieved May 17, 2010.
  3. ^ Bashore, Mel (December 25, 2007). "Ed Salem". Find-A-Grave. Retrieved May 17, 2010.
1947 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1947 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1947 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 53rd overall and 14th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Harold Drew, in his first year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa and Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. They finished with a record of eight wins and three losses (8–3 overall, 5–2 in the SEC) and with a loss in the Sugar Bowl.

After the Crimson Tide opened the season with a victory over Mississippi Southern, Alabama lost consecutive. games against Tulane and Vanderbilt to open the season 1–2. However, the Crimson Tide rebounded to win their final seven games against Duquesne, Tennessee, Georgia, Kentucky, Georgia Tech, LSU and Miami. Alabama then lost to Texas in the Sugar Bowl to finish the season 8–3.

The 1947 season also marked the first for Harold Drew as head coach for the Crimson Tide. Drew was hired as the replacement for long-time head coach Frank Thomas after he resigned his post due to personal health conditions in January 1947.

1948 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1948 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1948 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 54th overall and 15th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Harold Drew, in his second year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished with a record of six wins, four losses and one tie (6–4–1 overall, 4–4–1 in the SEC).

Alabama opened the season with a loss to Tulane, the first for Alabama to open a season since 1903. The next week the Crimson Tide had to score a touchdown with ten seconds left to salvage a tie with Vanderbilt in the first game ever played at Ladd Stadium. Alabama then defeated Duquesne at home, lost at Tennessee and won at Mississippi State before their 35–0 loss to eventual SEC Champion Georgia. The Crimson Tide then rebounded with victories over Mississippi Southern and Georgia Tech before they lost at LSU. Alabama then closed their season with a homecoming victory over Florida and a 55–0 win over Auburn in the renewal of their rivalry.

1949 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1949 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1949 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 55th overall and 16th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Harold Drew, in his third year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished with a record of six wins, three losses and one tie (6–3–1 overall, 4–3–1 in the SEC).

Alabama opened the season with losses against Tulane and at Vanderbilt before they notched their first win of the season against Duquesne at Denny Stadium. A week later, the Crimson Tide played Tennessee to a tie before they won five consecutive games over Mississippi State, Georgia, Georgia Tech, Mississippi Southern and Florida. Alabama then closed their season with a 14–13 loss to Auburn in the Iron Bowl after Ed Salem missed an extra point that would have tied the game with less than two minutes left in the game.

1949 All-SEC football team

The 1949 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1949 college football season. Tulane won the conference.

1950 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1950 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1950 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 56th overall and 17th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Harold Drew, in his fourth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished with a record of nine wins and two losses (9–2 overall, 6–2 in the SEC).

Alabama opened the season with victories over Chattanooga and Tulane before they lost their first game of the season against Vanderbilt at Ladd Stadium. The Crimson Tide rebounded the next week with a win over Furman at Denny Stadium, but lost against Tennessee at Shields-Watkins Field in week five. Alabama ten went on to win their final six games over Mississippi State, Georgia, Mississippi Southern, Georgia Tech, Florida and Auburn. Although they finished ranked in the top 20 of both major polls, the Crimson Tide did not receive a bid to play in a bowl game at the conclusion of the season.

1950 All-SEC football team

The 1950 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1950 college football season. Kentucky won the conference.

1966–67 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team

The 1966–67 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team won UCLA's third NCAA National Basketball Championship under head coach John Wooden with a win over Dayton.

In the NCAA West Regional at Corvallis, Oregon, the Bruins beat Wyoming (109–60) and Pacific (80–64). The Final Four was played in Louisville, Kentucky, where UCLA defeated Houston (73–58) and Dayton (79–64).The Bruins were led by starters Lynn Shackelford, Kenny Heitz, Lew Alcindor, Mike Warren, and Lucius Allen.

A Horse and Two Goats and Other Stories

A Horse and Two Goats and Other Stories (also published as A Horse and Two Goats) is a collection of short stories by R. K. Narayan, published in 1970 by The Bodley Head. The book is illustrated by R. K. Laxman, Narayan's brother, and includes five stories. The title story is a sly narrative of a business transaction between an American tourist and an Indian goat-herder as the result of an inability to communicate with each other.

Denny Chimes

Denny Chimes is a 115-foot (35 m) tall campanile tower on the south side of The Quad at the University of Alabama, in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The tower was named in honor of George H. Denny, who served as university president from 1912 to 1936 and then again in 1941. It is equipped with a 25-bell carillon. The tower is one of the most visible landmarks on campus.

Eucatastrophe

A eucatastrophe is a sudden turn of events at the end of a story which ensures that the protagonist does not meet some terrible, impending, and very plausible and probable doom. The writer J. R. R. Tolkien coined the word by affixing the Greek prefix eu, meaning good, to catastrophe, the word traditionally used in classically inspired literary criticism to refer to the "unraveling" or conclusion of a drama's plot. For Tolkien, the term appears to have had a thematic meaning that went beyond its literal etymological meaning in terms of form. In his definition as outlined in his 1947 essay "On Fairy-Stories", eucatastrophe is a fundamental part of his conception of mythopoeia. Though Tolkien's interest is in myth, it is also connected to the gospel; Tolkien calls the Incarnation of Christ the eucatastrophe of "human history" and the Resurrection the eucatastrophe of the Incarnation.Eucatastrophe has been labelled as a form of deus ex machina, due to both sharing an impossible problem being suddenly resolved. However, differences between the two have also been noted, such as its inherent connection to an optimistic view on the unfolding of events in the narrative of the world. In his view, eucatastrophe can also occur without the use of a deus ex machina.

Grover Cleveland Alexander

Grover Cleveland Alexander (February 26, 1887 – November 4, 1950), nicknamed "Old Pete", was an American Major League Baseball pitcher. He played from 1911 through 1930 for the Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Cubs, and St. Louis Cardinals. He was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1938.

Henryetta, Oklahoma

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Herb Adderley

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Jibboom

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Jim Abbott

James Anthony Abbott (born September 19, 1967) is a former Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher who played despite having been born without a right hand. He played ten seasons in MLB for the California Angels, New York Yankees, Chicago White Sox, and Milwaukee Brewers, from 1989 to 1999.

He graduated from Flint Central High School and grew up in the East Village area of Flint, Michigan. While with the University of Michigan, Abbott won the James E. Sullivan Award as the nation's best amateur athlete in 1987 and won a gold medal in the demonstration event at the 1988 Summer Olympics. He was drafted in the first round of the 1988 MLB draft and reached the major leagues the next year. As a member of the Yankees, he threw a no-hitter against the Cleveland Indians in 1993. Abbott retired with a career record of 87 wins and 108 losses, along with a 4.25 earned run average.

He currently works as a motivational speaker.

Making Do

Making Do is a 1963 novel written by Paul Goodman and published by Macmillan.

Massachusetts Banishment Act

The Massachusetts Banishment Act, officially named the "Banishment Act of the State of Massachusetts", was a bill of attainder passed in September 1778 "to prevent the return to this state of certain persons therein named and others who have left this state or either of the United States, and joined the enemies thereof." Over 300 people, including many former officials of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, were listed in the act.

The Living Death (Killmaster novel)

The Living Death is the forty-eighth novel in the Nick Carter-Killmaster series of spy novels. Carter is a US secret agent, code-named N-3, with the rank of Killmaster. He works for AXE – a secret arm of the US intelligence services.

Troy Aikman

Troy Kenneth Aikman (born November 21, 1966) is a former American football quarterback who played for the Dallas Cowboys in the National Football League (NFL). The number one overall draft pick in 1989, Aikman played twelve consecutive seasons as the starting quarterback with the Cowboys, the greatest number of seasons by any Cowboy quarterback. During his career he was a six-time Pro Bowl selection, led the team to three Super Bowl victories, and was the MVP of Super Bowl XXVII. Aikman was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2006 and to the College Football Hall of Fame on December 9, 2008 in New York City.Currently he works as a television sportscaster for the Fox network. He is also a former joint owner of the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series racing team Hall of Fame Racing along with fellow former Cowboys quarterback Roger Staubach, and was a part-owner of the San Diego Padres.

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