Ed Heusser

Edward Burlton Heusser (May 7, 1909 – March 1, 1956) was an American professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1935 to 1948 for the St. Louis Cardinals, Philadelphia Phillies, Philadelphia Athletics, and Cincinnati Reds. He was the National League earned run average champion in 1944 with the Cincinnati Reds. For his career, he compiled a 56-67 record in 266 appearances with a 3.69 ERA and 299 strikeouts. While playing, Heusser earned the colorful nickname of "The Wild Elk of Wasatch".[1]

Heusser was born in Salt Lake County, Utah, and later died from cancer in Aurora, Colorado, at the age of 46.

Ed Heusser
Pitcher
Born: May 7, 1909
Salt Lake County, Utah
Died: March 1, 1956 (aged 46)
Aurora, Colorado
Batted: Switch Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 25, 1935, for the St. Louis Cardinals
Last MLB appearance
September 14, 1948, for the Philadelphia Phillies
MLB statistics
Win–loss record56–67
Earned run average3.69
Strikeouts299
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

References

  1. ^ Taylor, Ted (2010). The Ultimate Philadelphia Athletics Reference Book 1901–1954. USA: XLibris Corporation. p. 456. ISBN 9781450025720.

External links

1909 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1909 throughout the world.

1935 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1935 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 54th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 44th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 96–58 during the season and finished 2nd in the National League.

1936 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1936 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 55th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 45th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 87–67 during the season and finished 2nd in the National League.

1938 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1938 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in American baseball. The team finished in eighth place – last in an eight-team National League – with a record of 45–105, 43 games behind the first-place Chicago Cubs and 24.5 games behind the seventh-place Brooklyn Dodgers. It was the first of five straight seasons in which the Phillies finished in last place. The Phillies wore blue and yellow on their uniforms in honor of the Tercentenary of New Sweden.The Phillies moved from their old home park, Baker Bowl, to Shibe Park midway through the season. Phillies president Gerald Nugent was eager to cut expenses and he cited the move as an opportunity for the Phillies to cut expenses by sharing stadium upkeep with the Philadelphia Athletics.

1940 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1940 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 54 wins and 100 losses.

1943 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1943 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the National League with a record of 87–67, 18 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1944 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1944 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. It consisted of the Cincinnati Reds attempting to win the National League, although finishing in third place. They had 89 wins and 65 losses.

1944 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1944 throughout the world.

1945 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1945 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 61–93, 37 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1946 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1946 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the National League with a record of 67–87, 30 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1947 Brooklyn Dodgers season

On April 15, Jackie Robinson was the opening day first baseman for the Brooklyn Dodgers, becoming the first black player in Major League Baseball. Robinson went on to bat .297, score 125 runs, steal 29 bases and be named the very first African-American Rookie of the Year. The Dodgers won the National League title and went on to lose to the New York Yankees in the 1947 World Series. This season was dramatized in the movie 42.

1956 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1956 throughout the world.

Cincinnati Reds all-time roster

This list is complete and up-to-date as of December 31, 2014.The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared at least in one game for the Cincinnati Reds National League franchise (1890–1953, 1958–present), also known previously as the Cincinnati Red Stockings (1882–1889) and Cincinnati Redlegs (1953–1958).

Players in Bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Players in Italics have had their numbers retired by the team.

Danville minor league baseball team (Illinois)

Several different minor league ballclubs have been based in the town of Danville, Illinois, fielding teams in 38 seasons between 1888 and 1982. In 1989, a new version of the Danville Dans began operation as a collegiate summer league baseball team playing in the Prospect League. The team plays at Danville Stadium.

Danville played at Soldiers Home Park from 1922 to 1932. Between 1946 and 1982, Danville teams played at Danville Stadium, located at 610 Highland Boulevard

Heusser

Heusser is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Ed Heusser (1909–1956), American basketball player

Felipe Heusser (born 1980), Chilean activist

Jakob Heusser (1862–1941), Swiss industrialist

Johanna Spyri (née Heusser) (1827-1901), Swiss-born novelist

Jake Early

Jacob Willard Early (May 19, 1915 – May 31, 1985) was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as a catcher for the Washington Senators and the St. Louis Browns. Early was a left-hand-hitting batter and was known for his skill at catching the knuckleball.

Stew Hofferth

Stewart Edward Hofferth (January 27, 1913 – March 7, 1994) was an American professional baseball player. The catcher appeared in 136 Major League Baseball games played over three seasons for the 1944–46 Boston Braves. Listed at 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 metres) tall and 195 pounds (88 kilograms), Hofferth threw and batted right-handed. He was born in Logansport, Indiana.

Hofferth spent eight years (1936–43) in minor league baseball, including three seasons (1940–42) as a player-manager in the Brooklyn Dodgers' organization, before his promotion to the Braves in 1944 during the World War II manpower shortage. He appeared in a career-high 66 games during his rookie season as the backup to Phil Masi and Clyde Kluttz. On May 13, 1944, Hofferth collected four hits and scored four runs in six at bats to help lead the Braves to a 16–2 rout of the Pittsburgh Pirates at Forbes Field. Two and a half months later, on July 30, he had another four-hit day against the Pirates, this time in four at bats, in a 6–4 Boston triumph at Braves Field.Hofferth's playing time diminished in 1945, although he hit three home runs and started 43 games at catcher (both career bests) for the Braves that season. Hofferth then spent the first two months of the postwar 1946 campaign on the Braves' roster, appearing in 20 games and starting 15 behind the plate. On June 15, he went hitless in three at bats against Ed Heusser of the Cincinnati Reds at Braves Field. Later that day, then the trading deadline in Major League Baseball, he was reacquired by Brooklyn in a one-for-one deal for fellow Hoosier Billy Herman, the veteran 36-year-old second baseman in the twilight of a Hall of Fame career. Hofferth never played another MLB game and retired after spending 1948 as a player-manager in the Dodger organization.

In addition to four home runs, his 88 big-league hits included 11 doubles and one triple. Hofferth died at age 81 in Valparaiso, Indiana.

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